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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:16 pm

A fine book by Pierre Bourdieau.

Distinction

Excerpts.


Quote :
The Aristocracy of Culture
"Sociology is rarely more akin to social psychoanalysis than when it con­fronts an object like taste, one of the most vital stakes in the struggles fought in the field of the dominant class and the field of cultural produc­tion. This is not only because the judgement of taste is the supreme manifestation of the discernment which, by reconciling reason and sensibility, the pedant who understands without feeling and the mondain who enjoys without understanding, defines the accomplished individual.
Nor is it solely because every rule of propriety designates in advance the project of defining this indefinable essence as a clear manifestation of philistinism-whether it be the academic propriety which, from Alois Riegl and Heinrich WOltllin to Elie Faure and Henri Focillon, and from the most scholastic commentators on the classics to the avant-garde semiologist, insists on a formalist reading of the work of art; or the up­per-class propriety which treats taste as one of the surest signs of true no­bility and cannot conceive of referring taste to anything other than itself.

Aristocracies are essentialist. Regarding existence as an emanation of essence, they set no intrinsic value on the deeds and misdeeds enrolled in the records and registries of bureaucratic memory. They prize them only insofar as they clearly manifest, in the nuances of their manner, that their one inspiration is the perpetuating and celebrating of the essence by vir­ tue of which they are accomplished. The same essentialism requires them to impose on themselves what their essence imposes on them-noblesse oblige-to ask of themselves what no one else could ask, to 'live up' to their own essence.

This effect is one of the mechanisms which, in conditions of crisis, cause the most privileged individuals, who remain most attached to the former state of affairs, to be the slowest to understand the need to change strategy and so to fall-victim to their own privilege (for example, ruined nobles who refuse to change their ways, or the heirs ofgreat peasant families who remain celibate rather than marry beneath them). It could be shown, in the same way, that the ethic of noblesse oblige, still found in some fractions of the peasantry and traditional
craftsmen, contributes significantly to the self­ exploitation characteristic of these classes.

This gives us an insight into the effect of academic markers and classi­fications. However, for a full understanding we have to consider another property of all aristocracies. The essence in which they see themselves refuses to be contained in any definition. Escaping petty rules and regula­tions, it is, by nature, freedom.

It should not be thought that the relationship of distinction (which may or may not imply the conscious intention of distinguishing oneself from common people) is only an incidental component in the aesthetic disposition. The pure gaze implies a break with the ordinary attitude
to­wards the world which, as such, is a social break. One can agree with Or­tega y Gasset when he attributes to modern art-which merely
takes to its extreme conclusions an intention implicit in art since the Renaissance-a systematic refusal of all that is 'human', by which he means the passions, emotions and feelings which ordinary people put into their ordi­nary existence, and consequently all the themes and objects capable of evoking them: 'People like a play when they are able to take an interest in the human destinies put before them', in which 'they participate as if they were real-life events.'

Rejecting the 'human' clearly means reject­ing what is generic, i.e., common, and immediately accessible, starting with everything that reduces the aesthetic animal to pure and simple animality, to palpable pleasure or sensual desire. The interest in the content of the representation which leads people to call 'beautiful' the representation of beautiful things, especially. those which speak most im­mediately to the senses and the sensibility, is rejected in favour of the in­ difference and distance which refuse to subordinate judgement of the representation to the nature of the object represented."

It can be seen that it is not so easy to describe the 'pure' gaze without also describing the naive gaze which it defines itself against, and vice
versa; and that there is no neutral, impartial, 'pure' description of either of these oppos­ing visions (which does not mean that one has to subscribe to aesthetic relativism, when it is so obvious that the 'popular aesthetic' is defined in relation to 'high' aesthetics and that reference to legitimate art and its negative judgement on 'popular' taste never ceases to haunt the popular experience of beauty).


THE POPULAR 'AESTHETIC'

Everything takes place as if the 'popular aes­thetic' were based on the affirmation of continuity between art and life, which implies the subordination of form to function, or, one might say. on a refusal of the refusal which is the starting point of the high aes­ thetic, i.e., the clear-cut separation of ordinary dispositions from the spe­cifically aesthetic disposition. The hostility of the working class and of the middle-class fractions least rich in cultural capital towards every kind of formal experimentation asserts itself both in the theatre and in paint­ing, or still more clearly, because they have less legitimacy, in photogra­phy and the cinema. In the theatre as in the cinema, the popular audience
delights in plots that proceed logically and chronologically towards a happy end, and 'identifies' better with simply drawn situations and
char­acters than with ambiguous and symbolic figures and actions or the enigmatic problems of the theatre of cruelty, not to mention the suspended animation of Beckettian heroes or the bland absurdities of Pinteresque di­ alogue.

Their reluctance or refusal springs not just from lack of familiar­ity but from a deep-rooted demand for participation, which formal experiment systematically disappoints, especially when, refusing to offer the 'vulgar' arrracrions of an art of illusion, the theatrical fiction de­nounces itself, as in all forms of 'play within a play'.

The desire to enter into the game, identifying with the characters' joys and sufferings, worrying about their fate, espousing their hopes and ideals, living their life, is based on a form of investment, a sort of deliberate 'naivety', ingenuousness, good-natured credulity ('We're here to enjoy ourselves'), which tends to accept formal experiments and specifically artistic effects only to the extent that they can be forgotten and do not get in the way of the substance of the work.

Conversely, popular entertainment secures the spectator's participation. In the show and collective participation in the festivity which i.t occasions. If circus and melodrama (which are recreated by some sporting spectacles such as wrestlmg and, to a lesser extent, boxing and all forms of team games, such as these which have been televised) are more 'popular' than entertainments like dancing or theatre, this is not merely because, being less formalized (compare, for example, acrobatics with dancing) and less euphemlzed, they offer more direct, more immediate sa(lsfactlons. It is also because, through the collective festivity they give rise to and the array of spectacu­lar delights they offer ( I am thinking also of the music-hall, light opera or the big feature film ) -fabulous sets, , glittering costumes, excItIng music lively action, enthusiastic actors-like all forms of the comIC and especially those working through satirc or parody of the 'great' -, they satisfy the taste for and sense of revelry, .the plain speaking and hearty laughter which liberate by setting the social world head over heels, overturning conventions and prophetlcs.

Economic power is first and foremost a power to keep economic neces­Sity at arm's length. This is why it universally asserts itself by the destruc­tion of riches, conspicuous consumption, squandering, and every form of gratuitous luxury. Thus, whereas the court aristocracy made the whole of life a contlnuous spectacle, the bourgeoisie has established the opposition between what is paid for and what is free, the interested and the disin­terested...

Tastes (i.e., manifested preferences) are the practical affirmation of an inevitable difference. It is no accident that, when they have to be
justi­fied, they are asserted purely negatively, by the refusal of other tastes.'· In matters of taste, more than anywhere else, all determinacion is negarion;')o and tastes are perhaps first and foremost disrastes, disgust provoked by horror or visceral intolerance ('sick-making') of the tastes ofothers. 'De gustibus non est dispurandum': not because 'tous les gouts sont dans la nature', but because each taste feels itself to be natural-and so it almost is, being a habitus-which amounts to rejecting others as unnatural and therefore vicious. Aestheric intolerance can be terribly violent.

Aversion to different life-styles is perhaps one of the strongest barriers between the classes; class endogamy is evidence of this. The most intolerable thing for those who regard themselves as the possessors of legitimate culture is the sacrilegious reuniting of tastes which taste dictates shll be separated. This means... At stake in every struggle over art there is also the imposition of an art of living, that is, the transmutation of an arbitrary way of living into the legitimate way of life which casts every other way of living into arbitrari­ness.'

All institutionalized learning presupposes a degree of rationalization, which leaves its mark on the relationship to the goods consumed. The sovereign pleasure of the aesthete dispenses with concepts. It is opposed much to the thoughtless pleasure of the 'naive' (glorified in ide­ology... which put knowledge above experience and sacrifice contemplation of the work to discussion of the work, aisthesis to askesis, like film-buffs who know everything there is to know about films they have not seen.

Personality - is the quality of the person affirmed in the capacity to appropriate an object of quality - the more the time it needs for appropriation, more distinctive the person. The manner of consuming creates the object of consumption.

True distinction does not explain.
It distinguishes itself by a silent discretion with which the like-minded affirm their common membership.
There is a loftiness of emblematic references, no allusion to authorities."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:35 pm

That's an excellent find.

It would be nice if you could provide, in the ADYTON section, pdf files of these books.
We are dealing with a war of information, of attitude...so it must be fought on an intellectual level.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:48 pm

In the ADYTON please.

Do you want them to shut us down?

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 09, 2013 2:57 pm

Its publicly published on the most popular site like Amazon and everywhere, would that still be a problem?

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 09, 2013 3:02 pm

Yes.

If hate is involved...one spurred on my insecurity....it can become a problem.

The privileged information is reserved for the select few.
In public we speak with the forked tongue of the commonplace...only alluding to what is fact.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:28 am

Nietzsche on Solitude

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:29 am

Authors are suggested on the side:
The Nietzsche-Circle Book Recommendations

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Thu Jan 17, 2013 7:11 pm

The Tea Ceremony.
Etsuko Kato.

Quote :
"Some people only see an aspect of temae as manners (sahô; see the later discussion) and give the superficial criticism that it is too stiff. But such a remark comes from their ignorance of the true meaning of the tea cere- mony’ (Sen Sôshitsu 1998b: 4). He continues: The way of communication, and movement of hands, feet, or overall body posture regulated by temae – all these are in accordance with five Confucian virtues to which every human being should conform: loyalty [jin], righteousness [gi], politeness [rei], wisdom [chi] and trust [shin]. And it [temae] naturally leads one to the practice of morals that every human being should conform to. Then it [temae] eventually con- stitutes daily habits and mental attitudes [kokoro-gamae] which prevent one from careless mistakes. Thus it [temae] constitutes the motive force in human life.


As an old country, Japan has well-developed reigi-sahô. Moreover, not a few people [in history] have learned the tea ceremony or flower arrangement to calm their minds and cultivate themselves, or have had keiko of dance [shimai, butô] to learn elegant body movement
[tachi-i-monogoshi]. It is expected for young women today to succeed such humble spirit of past people. ‘Do not lean back, nor bend, but be straight. Walking too fast looks vulgar; walking too slowly looks affected. Do not take too big or small steps. Feel the lower half of your body [when walking],’ [as] Sakuma Shôzan [wrote].
Meanwhile, one of the early sahô textbooks stated that ‘tidiness in hair- styles, clothing and body naturally makes the inside of your mind (kokoro no naka) tidy, and keeps evil ideas away. This is because sahô does not simply correct outer forms, but thereby influences the inside of your mind’ (Kiuchi and Tanikawa 1892: 4).

What Foucault calls ‘discipline’ is ‘self- discipline’ by definition. In his discussion of ‘control of activity’, one of his four techniques of (self-)discipline, Foucault reduces the way human activities are controlled into five elements:

1 the time-table,
2 the temporal elaboration of the act,
3 the correlation of the gesture and the overall position of the body,
4 the body-object articulation,
5 exhaustive use of time (Foucault 1975: 149–156).13

Although all of them hold true to temae in one way or another, 2, 3 and 4 are especially relevant to the current discussion for they are almost identi- cal to the characteristics of temae.

Despite its practical aim of making tea, one of many daily activities, temae is a cluster of minute rules that govern every single movement,
every single finger. Thus, temae elaborates numerous actions originally seen in daily life. For example, to dry a rinsed cup, a tea ceremony practitioner must turn the cup three times and a half while a cotton cloth, folded in a specific way, is touched to the rim. Walking
has to be a silent, sliding movement of the feet, with their toes slightly raised occasionally, while avoiding stepping on the edges of the tatami mats (straw mats laid in the room). These are, in short, ‘another degree of precision in the breakdown of gestures and movements, another way of adjusting the body to tempo- ral imperatives’, which Foucault saw in the mid-eighteenth century mili- tary marching (Foucault 1975: 151).

It is also a noticeable characteristic of the control of body movement by temae that every act requires a ‘proper’ posture of the overall
body, just as Foucault saw in pupils’ training in ‘good handwriting’ (Foucault 1975: 152). Opening the sliding door, bowing, whisking tea powder with hot water – all these acts are not simply acts of the hands or the head but also acts of the properly straightened back, the elbows stuck out, or the fingers neatly put together.

The most unique characteristic of temae as a method of discipline, however, lies in its articulation in the manipulation of tea utensils, or ‘the instrumental coding of the body’; Foucault saw it in the management of the rifle, which the eighteenth century military theoreticians called ‘manoeuvre’ (Foucault 1975: 153).

The ‘manoeuvre’ of temae is twofold: one is the precise placement of tea utensils in the right places in the tearoom. When the host brings a cup and a tea powder container into the room, for example, these utensils must be placed in front of the fresh water container, which is already set in the right place in the room, so that the three constitute an isosceles or equilateral triangle. When a tea scoop (a bamboo spoon) is offered to the guests after the ceremony for admira- tion, it must be placed so that the end of its tail is apart from the edge of one of the
tatami mats by three stitches of the braids of the straws (that is, two or three centimeters). The other aspect of ‘manoeuvre’ of temae is the precise management of tea utensils. When the host holds a tea scoop, for example, the fingers should not be closer to the top than the middle of the stalk. The way the host holds and rests the ladle differs according to whether it scoops up hot water from the kettle or cold water from the fresh water container.

All such body movements require a great deal of training to reach perfection – and it is impossible to reach perfection. However, it is this very impossibility of perfection of body movement that makes the tea cere- mony a mental discipline as well. One is supposed to always be self- reflective, attributing one’s imperfection of body movement not only to the lack of enough practice but also to imperfection of mind. Thus, the endlessness of bodily discipline is merged with endlessness of mental discipline.

The original Japanese words for the tea ceremony, sadô or chadô, may help the imagery of ‘endlessness’ in the practitioner’s mind; sa- or
cha- means ‘tea’, and dô means ‘way’ or ‘path’.

Temae and after are called ‘secret transmissions’ (hiden or sôden-mono), which cannot be taught in any written form – neither in textbooks nor in personal memos – but must be transmitted only physically and orally. Such rules may make the cultural field of the tea ceremony parallel with: non-literate society where inherited knowledge can only survive in the incorporated state. It is never detached from the body that bears it and can be reconstituted only by means of a kind of gymnastics designed to evoke it, a mimesis which . . . implies total investment
and deep emotional identification . . . and this knowledge never has the objectivity it derives from objectification in writing and the consequent freedom with respect to the body. (Bourdieu 1980: 73)

Especially referring to Rikyû’s inclination to Zen Buddhism, Sen maintains:
For body movement is ultimately the expression of spirit [seishin], refinement of mind [kokoro] leads to the extremely ascetic [kokô] and
highly tasteful [kakuchô-no takai] body movement. Thus one’s temae reveals all about one’s personality."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:20 pm

Subculture of Non-Violence
By Jean Baudrillard / Translated by Chris Turner

Quote :
"Indissociable from these new-style phenomena of violence, though formally opposed to them, are the modern manifestations of non-violence. From LSD to flower-power, psychedelia to hippies, zen to pop music, all have in common the rejection of socialization through status and the principle of productivity, the rejection of this whole contemporary liturgy of affluence, social success and gadgetry. Whether this rejection paints itself as violent or non-violent, it is always the rejection of the activism of the society of growth, of enforced well-being as the new repressive order. In this sense, violence and non-violence, like all anomic phenomena, have a litmus function. This society which gives itself out to be, and sees itself as, hyperactive and pacified is revealed by the beats and the rockers on the one hand, and the hippies on the other, to be characterized at a deep level by passivity and violence. The one group lays hold of the latent violence of this society and turns that violence against it, taking it to extremes. The other group extends the secret, orchestrated passivity of this society (behind its façade of hyperactivity) into a practice of abdication and total asociality, thus causing that society to deny itself, in accordance with its own logic.

Let us leave aside here all the Christic, Buddhist, lamaistic themes of Love, Awakening and Heaven on earth, the Hindu litanies and total tolerance. The question would seem rather to be the following: do the hippies and their community represent a real alternative to the processes of growth and consumption? Are they not merely the inverted and complementary image of those processes? Are they an "anti-society", ultimately capable of overturning the whole social order, or are they merely a decadent outgrowth of that order — or even simply one of the many versions of the visionary sects which have always cast themselves out of the world in order imperatively to bring about the earthly paradise? Here again, we must not mistake the mere metamorphosis of an order for its subversion.

We want to have time for living and loving. The flowers, the beards, the long hair and the drugs are secondary ... Being "hip" first and foremost means being a friend to humanity. Someone who tries to take a fresh, non-hierarchical look at the world: a non-violent person, who respects and loves life. Someone who has true values and a true sense of proportion, who puts freedom before authority and creation before production, who values cooperation and non-competition ... Just someone kind and open who avoids doing others harm. That's the main thing.
Or again:

As a general rule, doing what you think is right whenever and wherever it may be, without worrying about approval or disapproval, on the sole express condition that it causes no harm or offence to anyone.
The hippies immediately made headlines in the West. With its fondness for primitive societies, the consumer society immediately seized on them as part of its folklore, like a strange, inoffensive flora. Are they not ultimately, from a sociological point of view, merely a luxury product of rich societies? Are not they, with their orientalist spirituality, their gaudy psychedelia, also marginals who merely exacerbate certain traits of their society?

They are, or remain, conditioned by the basic mechanisms of that society. Their asociality is communal, tribal. We may speak, in their regard, of McLuhan's "tribalism", that resurrection on a planetary scale, under the aegis of the mass media, of the oral, tactile, musical mode of communication which was that of archaic cultures before the visual, typographical era of the Book. They advocate the abolition of competition, of the defensive system and functions of the ego. But this is merely to translate into more or less mystical terms what has already been described by Riesman as "other-directedness", an objective evolution of personal character structure (organized around the ego and the superego) towards a group "ambience" in which everything comes from, and is directed towards, others. The hippies' mode of guileless emotional transparency is reminiscent of the imperative of sincerity, openness and "warmth" of the "peer group". As for the regression and infantilism which constitute the seraphic, triumphant charm of the hippie communities, these needless to say merely reflect, in glorificatory mode, the irresponsibility and infantilism to which modern society confines each of its individuals. In short, the "Human", almost hounded out of existence by productivist society and the obsession with social standing, celebrates its sentimental resurrection in the hippie community, where, beneath the apparent total anomie, all the dominant structural features of the mainstream society persist.

Writing of American youth, Riesman, referring to the cultural models defined by Margaret Mead, speaks of a "Kwakiutl" style and a "Pueblo" style. The Kwakiutl are violent, agonistic, competitive and rich, and engage in unrestrained consumption in the potlatch. The Pueblos are gentle, kind and inoffensive; they live frugally and are content to do so. Our current society can thus be defined by the formal opposition between a dominant culture which is one of unrestrained, ritualistic, conformist consumption, a culture which is violent and competitive (the potlatch of the Kwakiutl) and a permissive, euphoric, "drop-out" subculture of the hippie/Pueblo type. But everything indicates that, just as violence is immediately reabsorbed into "models of violence", the contradiction here resolves itself into functional coexistence. The extreme of acceptance and the extreme of rejection here meet up, as on a Moebius strip by means of a simple twist. And the two models ultimately develop in concentric zones around the same axis of the social order. John Stuart Mill put it brutally: "In this age, the mere example of non-conformity, the mere refusal to bend the knee to custom, is itself a service."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:58 pm

-

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Thu Jan 24, 2013 3:08 pm

Quote :
"In the chapters that follow, I hope to show how Achaemenian Persia perceived itself as God's chosen instrument for the project of world salvation, and, as such, supreme benefactor of the peoples it conquered. Beyond this, I am led to argue that such a perspective led the Achaemenians into severe contradictions, which they attempted to suppress and deny, using some rather desperate measures toward that impossible end. This analysis suggests comparison to certain contemporary data.

This book takes on a very weighty project, one presenting both historical arguments and reflections on empire in general. Working backward through the thesis, the book attempts to contemplate the Achaemenid empire in a way that sheds light on current events--particularly the American occupation of Iraq starting in 2003. Although this is only a small part of the book, it frames the argument (and appears in the title) and therefore deserves careful consideration.

The unifying theme of this book is the use and justification of torture as an instrument of imperial control, and Lincoln bookends his argument with two shocking descriptions, the first Achaemenid: According to Ctesias (in Plutarch Artaxerxes 16.1-4), Artaxerxes II subjected a Persian soldier to the ordeal of the troughs for revealing how Cyrus the Younger died in the battle of Cunaxa. The second is the American treatment of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib. The parallels between these two forms of torture, especially when juxtaposed against the lofty ideals of empire ("the pursuit of paradise," p. 2), led Lincoln to investigate the relationships among religion, torture, and empire."

Bruce Lincoln:Religion, Empire, and Torture

Although another reviewer says, this is common knowledge;

Quote :
"The author argues that Achaemenid religious dualism, in combination with the idea that a good Creation had been disturbed by Evil and the idea that the king had to restore the world's original goodness, could only create an imperialistic culture in which torture was common. After all, once the king had defeated his enemies, the original goodness of the world was restored, and those who still objected were, consequently, evil. Punishing them was a good thing to do, and doing bad things to bad people was considered to be a good thing.
The trouble is that we already knew this. Lincoln applies one of the lessons of Adorno and Horkheimer's famous Dialektik der Aufklärung: any ideology claiming universal applicability, even a rational system like Enlightenment, can turn into irrationalism and become extremely inhumane. "

...I found the above book absorbing in that it makes for modern Judaeo-Xt. American politics, a historical continuity of Zoroastrian Moral Dualism.


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Sat Jan 26, 2013 7:03 am

Xenophon's Anabasis.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:01 pm

The Judaizing of Wotan

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:14 am

Some modern works:
"Shogun" and "Tai Pan" by James Clavell
"The Young Caesar" and "Imperial Caesar" by Rex Warner
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:14 pm

A website with esoteric source texts from various traditions:

website
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:53 pm

Violence is Golden
Jack Donovan

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Sat Mar 02, 2013 7:32 pm

Victor Hanson's Page

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:38 pm

Onasander

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Thu May 09, 2013 8:36 pm

Quote :
"Michael Howard takes the title of his recent essay, The Invention of Peace, from the nineteenth-century jurist and historian of comparative law Henry Maine, who wrote that “war appears to be as old as mankind, but peace is a modern invention.”
We moderns tend to assume that the great wars of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were aberrant eruptions marring the peaceful status quo, but the opposite better describes the long view. Outside the Garden of Eden, human communities have always been involved in political conflict and that conflict has regularly escalated to the use of lethal force, both within the community and between communities. The ways in which peoples have both justified and constrained the use of such force are windows into how they see themselves and the other peoples with whom they share, often reluctantly, the world around them. To watch the changes that develop in even a single society’s understanding of war is to watch that society being born and reborn.

From Homer to Thucydides we jump at least 300 years into an entirely different moral world: no more superheroes and demi-gods. What prompts the Peloponnesian War are fears about the balance of power. But, as Yvon Garlan notes, the wars of the Greeks and Romans, early and late, were hedged round with rules guaranteed by the gods. “The ancients,” he writes, “could not imagine a true war that was not limited in time by declarations, agreements, and symbolic acts.” For Greeks and Romans war displays a “sacral rhythm” which moves from the sacred precincts to the councils of the people to a solemn declaration, all under the aegis of the gods. Wars were interrupted “to observe a sacred truce during the great panhellenic festivals.”
Wars were ended by solemn oaths guaranteed by the gods. The political order “was converted into a three-sided contract by the intervention of sacred powers.”

The laws of war were also guaranteed by the gods. Anything dedicated to them was absolutely immune for attack. Not only the priests of the temples, but everything “which belonged to the gods (sanctuaries, temples, altars, wealth, flocks and lands) or fell under their protection (tombs, certain types of monuments, sometimes even entire towns)” was out of bounds, at least in theory; “men sometimes forgot the terrible punishment meted out to Ajax by Athena for having brutally torn the prophetess Cassandra from her Trojan temple.” Ambassadors, because they were traditionally priests, were immune. Duty required that battle be followed immediately by the burial of the dead. In early times, according to Garlan, trophies were dedicated to the gods, though by the time of the Empire they had become symbols of personal glory.

Such was the situation when the Romans became the lords of the Mediterranean. Even at the time of Jesus the Romans, with their punctilious commitment to the demands of law, couched war in ritual context. A generation or two ago it was common to think that early Christianity “condemned warfare and military service on grounds that were essentially ‘pacifist.’” Hunter surveys a number of volumes that have changed the perspective on military service. John Helgeland’s studies of the Roman army suggest that Christians had been serving in the army since at least the middle of the second century.

Ambrose and Augustine, writing after the conversion of the emperors, theologically ratify a situation that had been uncertain since the persecutions under Diocletian in the late third and early fourth centuries. In letter 189 to Boniface, military governor of Numidia, Augustine exhorts him not to “think that no one who serves as a soldier, using arms for warfare, can be acceptable to God.” Augustine goes on to enumerate the devout soldiers of the New Testament and to explain that Christian soldiers “don’t seek peace in order to stir up war; no – war is waged in order to obtain peace.” Furthermore, “it ought to be necessity, and not your will, that destroys an enemy who is fighting you. And just as you use force against the rebel or opponent, so you ought now to use mercy towards the defeated and the captive.”

Augustine had elaborated his view of war as a tragic necessity, inevitable given human sinfulness, in his Contra Faustum of 398. A few years before his death, in the famous book XIX of his City of God, he repeats it. The real evils of war are the vices that motivate human beings to anti-social behavior. All that the soldier can do is serve in good conscience, abjuring hate and blood lust, to subdue disturbers of the peace and preserve the fragile order that is all we can manage in our earthly pilgrimage. Charlemagne had the works of Augustine read to him at meals." [Brekke, The Ethics of War in Asian Civilizations]

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Thu May 30, 2013 4:25 am

"I Owe You": Nietzsche, Mauss and the Potlatch

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Thu May 30, 2013 4:51 pm

Lyssa wrote:
The Judaizing of Wotan

incorrect in so many ways
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 12:56 pm

hǣþen wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
The Judaizing of Wotan

incorrect in so many ways

Are you a Wagnerian or a Gnostic?

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 12:57 pm

Science and the Active Voice

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:32 pm

what is a wagnerian?
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:05 pm

Lyssa wrote:
hǣþen wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
The Judaizing of Wotan

incorrect in so many ways

Are you a Wagnerian or a Gnostic?

I appreciate his works(Wagner) but his ring cycle is based off of christian sources, namely the poetic edda. Its heavily based on a xtian world view. Hence the author of that article can draw such incorrect conclusions being selective of his/her sources.

To answer your question I would need more of an elaboration of the context you mean it in.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:53 pm

hǣþen wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
hǣþen wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
The Judaizing of Wotan

incorrect in so many ways

Are you a Wagnerian or a Gnostic?

I appreciate his works(Wagner) but his ring cycle is based off of christian sources, namely the poetic edda. Its heavily based on a xtian world view. Hence the author of that article can draw such incorrect conclusions being selective of his/her sources.

Then we agree.

I have not ventured into how the eddas themselves might contain Xt. elements; that for another day. If you have something to offer in that regard, would be glad to hear.

For instance, here's another one:

Esus


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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:54 pm

Guest wrote:
what is a wagnerian?

In this context, I meant someone who believes in a world-redeemer, an Aryan-Christ and such.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:08 pm

I will post some interesting books for you

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especially the part where it talks of the clerical mind.

Wrt to the eddas I'll post something when recall the correct source. Here is some food for though though, the eddas were written down roughly 270 years after the conversion of Iceland. Said another way almost 300 years after the close of the heathen period in that area. Snorri was educated in Paris and exposed to plenty of classical literature, ever wondered why some of the deities and myths are so similar to the Greek? The trend in europe at that time was to claim origin from Troy and you'll find that right in the intro of his work. Classical literature such as the Illiad had prestige.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:14 pm

Thanks for the suggestions; I have the first one, just haven't gotten to it.

The second is new to me, will look into it.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:19 pm

In Sheep's Clothing: Understanding and Dealing with Manipulative People by George K. Simon

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Quote :
Knowing Yourself Better

            Any manipulator’s real leverage is in knowing the character of his victim well enough to know how that person will likely respond to the tactics he uses.  He may know the victim will give him the benefit of the doubt, buy his excuses, be hesitant to ascribe evil intention, etc.  He may know how conscientious the individual is and how effective shame and guilt will be in getting him or her to back down.  Manipulators generally take the time to scope out the characteristics and weaknesses of their victims.
            If manipulators gain leverage by what they know about you, it only stands to reason that the more you know about yourself and the more you work to overcome your own vulnerabilities, the more leverage you gain in your dealings with them.  When examining your own character, here are some important things to look for:

            1.  NAIVETÉ.  You may be one of those individuals who finds it too hard to accept the notion that there really are people as cunning, devious, and ruthless as your gut tells you the manipulator in your life is.  That is, you may even be prone to engage in “neurotic” denial.  If you are, even when you’re confronted with abundant evidence you’re dealing with a ruthless conniver, you may refuse to believe it, reluctantly accepting reality only after being victimized too often.

            2.  OVER-CONSCIENTIOUSNESS.  Ask yourself if you’re one of those people who is much harder on themselves than anybody else.  You might be the kind of person who is too willing to give a would-be manipulator the benefit of the doubt.  When they do something to hurt you, you may be too ready to see their side of things and too willing to blame yourself when they go on the attack and throw you on the defensive.

            3.  LOW SELF-CONFIDENCE.  You may be one of those persons who is overly self-doubting, or chronically unsure of your right to pursue your legitimate wants and needs.  You may lack confidence about your ability to face conflicts directly and resolve them effectively.  If so, you’re likely to quit asserting yourself prematurely and also likely to go on the defensive too easily when challenged by an aggressive personality.

            4.  OVER-INTELLECTUALIZATION.  You may be one of those persons who tries too hard to understand.  If you’re also one who assumes that people only do hurtful things when there’s some legitimate, understandable reason, you might delude yourself into believing that uncovering and understanding all the reasons for your manipulator’s behavior will be sufficient to make things different.  Sometimes, by being overly focused on the possible reasons for a behavior, you may inadvertently excuse it.  Other times, you might get so wrapped-up in trying to understand what’s going on that you forget that someone is merely fighting to gain advantage over you and that you should be devoting your time and energy to taking necessary steps to protect and empower yourself.  If you over-intellectualize, you’ll likely have trouble accepting the simple philosophy that there are people in this world who fight too much, fight underhandedly, and for no other purpose than to get what they want.

5. EMOTIONAL DEPENDENCY.  You may have submissive personality characteristics rooted in deep fears of independence and autonomy.  If so, you might be attracted to the more confident-appearing, independent, and aggressive personalities in the first place.  After becoming involved in a relationship with them, you may also tend to let such people run over you out of fear that if you stand up to them you may be “abandoned” altogether.  The more emotionally dependent you are on someone, the more vulnerable you are to being exploited and manipulated by them.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:22 pm

A Handbook of Rhetorical Devices

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:12 pm

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in the introduction to his book Professor Orchard explains much about Snorri.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:48 pm

hǣþen wrote:
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in the introduction to his book Professor Orchard explains much about Snorri.

Thank you.

"It does not explain why Christian scribes went to the trouble and expense of copying heathen mythological poetry. It seems hard to believe that it survived only for the instruction of would-be skalds. Equally, if mythological poems were designed to embody and perpetuate heathen belief, why did they not become the object of ecclesiastical hostility after the Conversion?
Until quite recently,most critics regarded the mythology in the Poetic Edda as a single system that was accepted as ‘truth’ by the poets and most of their society. They therefore assumed that most mythological poems are the work of heathen poets. A few poems are still usually accepted as genuinely heathen (for example, the stanzas describing the hanging of Óðinn in Hávamál), and one (Võluspá) may be a thoughtful heathen’s response to the approach of Christianity. But poems such as Skírnismál, Lokasenna and Hymiskviða, which were generally accepted as heathen compositions until the mid-twentieth century, have more recently been seen as the work of twelfth- or thirteenth-century poets who must have been Christian in their everyday lives. Poets of this period cannot have intended to promote heathen belief, and it is embarrassing, to say the least, that it remains difficult to distinguish objectively between pre- and post-Conversion poems. Having assumed that the ‘canonical’ poems represented a single, genuinely heathen system, the tradition of scholarship initiated by Jacob Grimm then asserted, on the basis of comparisons with other Indo-European languages and mythologies, that this system was very ancient. This supposition has led to many attempts to discover the structures of a common Indo-European mythological system – a project which has often diverted scholarly attention away from the surviving sources themselves." [McKinnell, Meeting the Other in Norse Myth]

This is a huge topic and I am unfamiliar with any work critiquing Grimm.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Wed Aug 28, 2013 11:26 am

Quote :
Perhaps it is time to develop a new theory of history, one which sees our present stage of belief in “radical self-determination” as a necessary stage we must go through. And it promises only to get worse. What stage will succeed it? No one can say with certainty, but what it might be is a stage where, standing in the midst of a civilization ruined by liberalism, we recognize that we must consciously accept and affirm our determination by nature and by history. This means that we would affirm all those things taken for granted by our ancestors: the biological determination of masculinity and femininity, the necessity of the traditional family, the superiority of ethnically homogeneous societies, the inescapable realities of racial differences, and more.

The world of our ancestors was destroyed because they took all of this for granted and could not intellectually defend their world against the onslaught of moralizing Christian egalitarians and pseudo-scientific left-wing sophists. But we are in a position to possibly — just possibly — recover what was lost and to place it on firmer ground. Having seen the consequences of denying reality, we will affirm and defend reality with a wisdom, realism, and ferocity our ancestors were incapable of.

And then we will be all right (again).
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Tue Sep 03, 2013 10:05 am

Rebel Girl - An Interview with HBD chick

There is still hope.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Tue Sep 03, 2013 8:07 pm

A symphony in words; moving.

Gemma

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:31 am

The Culture of Critique: An Evolutionary Analysis of Jewish Involvement in Twentieth-Century Intellectual ...
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:33 am

White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:43 am

http://www.unz.org/

Mankind Quarterly:

http://www.unz.org/Pub/MankindQuarterly

Some interesting articles:

Human Populations and the Indo-European Problem
http://www.unz.org/Pub/MankindQuarterly-1992q4-00131

The Evolution of the Spartan Social System
http://www.unz.org/Pub/MankindQuarterly-1980jan-00331

Family and Social Structure in Early Rome
http://www.unz.org/Pub/MankindQuarterly-1979jun-00349

Ancient Eugenics
http://www.unz.org/Pub/MankindQuarterly-1992q2-00383
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Read Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:15 am

Duchesne's book on Western Civilization is gold if anyone still hasn't read it.

Pinker's book How The Mind Works has a good chapter "Family Values" with some interesting stuff.

The Subversive Family by Ferdinand Mount - Mount argues that the family is inherently subversive to the State (or Church or Cult etc.) and that at first, new establishments try to undermine it viciously, but always end up having to compromise. There is also heavy criticism of both Marxism and Christianity.

General System Theory by Ludwig von Bertalanffy - a novel yet very ancient Aryan way of looking at things, potentially a new Spenglerian "nature-feeling"

Evo and Proud - Peter Frost's blog (Anthropologist, HBD perspective)
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