Know Thyself

Nothing in Excess
 
HomePortalFAQMemberlistSearchRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard)

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:57 pm

Quotes from the books:

-Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing.

-She who had been the spoiled and petted daughter of the Duke of Kordava, learned what is was to be a buccaneer's plaything, and because she was supple enough to bend without breaking, she lived where other women had died, and because she was young and vibrant with life, she came to find pleasure in the existence.

-Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph.

-"If that's true, then answer this priest, why are we in these pits, hiding from some animal?" Conan asked "Someday, when all your civilization and science are likewise swept away, your kind will pray for a man with a sword."


Quotes from R.E. Howard:

-My body seems a mere encumbrance to me; an imbecillic wagon, hitched to the horse of desire, which is the soul.

-I mean my characters are more like men than these real men are, see. They’re rough and rude, they got hands and they got bellies. They hate and they lust; break the skin of civilization and you find the ape, roaring and red-handed.

-Hell, the world isn’t worth reforming or even aiding as I can see. Men are swine and most women are fools. Befriend a man and he’ll betray you. Fondle a woman and she’ll double-cross you – whip her and she’ll cringe to you.

-Money and muscle, that’s what I want; to be able to do any damned thing I want and get away with it. Money won’t do that altogether, because if a man is a weakling, all the money in the world won’t enable him to soak an enemy himself; on the other hand, unless he has money he may not be able to get away with it.

-I am unable to rouse much interest in any highly civilized race, country or epoch, including this one.


There are 3 movies about Conan, the barbarian. They are all based on the character and have some elements from the stories mixed together.

Conan the Barbarian 1982
Conan the Destroyer 1984
Conan the Barbarian 2011


I picked mostly the quotes which deal with his romantic approach to barbarism.
Conan is great pulp literature.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:20 am

Bazon Brock wrote a book "Der Barbar als Kulturheld" (German title). Translated : "the barbarian as cultural hero". (unfortunately no translation. But I might read it if I get a copy of the German book.)

Pulp literature sounds interesting. Jonathan Bowden even promotes comic books. Seems to bear some potential.
Back to top Go down
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Tue Feb 12, 2013 6:04 pm

I looked Bazon Brock up, a jewish name right? Be that as it may.

He did some art project when he was younger, writing on a metal plate the words (translated): "death must be abolished, this damned mess must stop. He who speaks a word of consolation is a traitor".
Yeah, most definitely, death is such a meanie, let's abolish it!
In a way that's some twisted anti-natalism.

Some of his quotes make me quite angry. Why? - because I don't understand them, I can read them 10 times and still get lost in the thoughts, if you want to call them that
- either he writes above my intellect, which I'd be fine with or as my gut is telling me, he's one of those guys who have reached a certain rank in the bullshit art-society and gets away with writing horseshit. Heck, maybe that's even a requirement in those circles.

Well his book you mentioned does include the word barbar in its title but I don't see much connection to Conan, pulp literature, historical "barbarism" or fictiona barbarism for that matter - it's about terrorists in modern times or something. I haven't read the book but if I had to guess it's probably about heroic suicide bombers sticking it to da man.

By the way the back of that book describes him as a victim of national socialism and other totalitarianism so he had to postpone his 'Wunderkind' days until old age. I find that lovely - not. By the way that part is at odds with the wiki on him.

Somehow I get the feeling I already wasted too much time on that guy by now.
Did that title just enter your mind and you mentioned it right away?

Jonathan Bowden I know a bit about. So he likes comic books and he thinks they bear some potential? Have to agree with him there, you could basically tell any book or story in comic book style more or less.

I'd roughly rank mediums like this:

1.Being told a story/Watching still pictures/Reading a story.
2.Reading a comic book (combines pictures and text)
3.Watching a movie (combines moving pictures with audio)

The more things are set the less your mind has to be creative and create a world in your mind, the pictures, the voices and so on. A movie does require the least amount of creative work to complement the story.

Don't remember where I heard this but it seems that children who didn't read or got stories told when they were young have a really hard time imagining things later in life. I find this to be very probable.
So there you go, no TV for the cubs. heh

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:01 am

Thanks for clearing that up. I would have researched the guy further. I just noted down the title, when I heard it, because it rang a bell with me. Most German intellectuals are like that.
I just saw he published a book "Profibürger" (with Peter Sloterdijk whose show he was on). Translation: "professional citizin" or even "professional bourgeois". Crying or Very sad

I read about your "air problem" earlier (in an astrological sense, in your "humor" description box)?

Check out Crowley. I think he was a Libra.

My favorite line from him:

"[...]they are the slaves of because: They are not of me."
Back to top Go down
apaosha
Daeva
avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1547
Join date : 2009-08-24
Age : 30
Location : Ireland

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:14 am

Quote :
R.E. Howard

You might find this relevant: http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywood/2011/02/12/The-Bankrupt-Nihilism-of-Our-Fallen-Fantasists

It's not only this genre that has declined, however. Authors that win prizes in this age write about defeat, futility, impotency, self-torture.... all sorts of things that on an individual basis reflect the self-abnegation and disintegration of this culture.

The writing was on the wall in the sixties. We live in the aftermath.

_________________
"I do not exhort you to work but to battle; I do not exhort you to peace but to victory. May your work be a battle; may your peace be a victory." -TSZ
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://knowthyself.forumotion.net
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:17 am

Quote :
Most German intellectuals are like that.
I'd say it's enhanced by an environment after WW2 where guilt is/was en vogue.
Also a great tool for creating a self-censoring public.
Germans are fierce people under their hood. All that will blow up at some point.
No peace, love and understanding no more.

Quote :
Check out Crowley. I think he was a Libra.
To learn from an 'airy' person?
Astrology to me, was a door into a realm where I read about different types of people and to get an understanding about people who are very different from me in their temperament.
It's like an old map to navigate the ocean of personalities, to understand more about others and also a guide to reflect about oneself.

I do think I have a weakness in Air but not in the sense that I want to correct it but that it's just a quality of me. (At least that's what I believe now). So I have a tendency to not be structured. I also have not much appreciation for civilizational structures, like ethics or morals in the civic sense. I realize their advantages and disadvantages (some of them) but I am not focused on it. I am about the smaller group and the dynamics within that.

Crowley, hm - wasn't he a founder of the whole Thelema thing?
I'd be more of an Austin Osman Spare reader.
All in all that was quite some time ago, when I read a bit about those things.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:32 am

Quote :
It's not only this genre that has declined, however. Authors that win prizes in this age write about defeat, futility, impotency, self-torture.... all sorts of things that on an individual basis reflect the self-abnegation and disintegration of this culture.

Read the article and found it to be refreshing.
Today it's about denial of larger parts of the human psyche. Who am I trying to fool here, I'm mostly talking about male virtues like aggression and so forth. But also some feminine qualities seem to be unwanted in modernity, although I haven't structured my thoughts on that yet. But of course, for the most parts it's masculine qualities which are shunned.

I agree that the decay is very visible in books as well. I tend to like movies and books much more who were made by people who grew up before the 60s happened. Although the 60s to me are only the beginning of a new small cycle within a bigger cycle which both lead to decay in western culture. I'm curious if we are going to 'bottom out' with the upcoming intermediate cycle low or if there is still much rope left on the way down.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:16 pm

Anfang wrote:

Read the article and found it to be refreshing.

Refreshing? How is conservativism refreshing? Conservativism enables the progress of entropy, as Satyr himself stated.

Quote :

Today it's about denial of larger parts of the human psyche. Who am I trying to fool here, I'm mostly talking about male virtues like aggression and so forth. But also some feminine qualities seem to be unwanted in modernity, although I haven't structured my thoughts on that yet. But of course, for the most parts it's masculine qualities which are shunned.

Females are nature. Nature is shunned. See the MRA's. The feminine is scary. The unkown, the depth, the hole, the dark woods, the night, the moon, the gap, the hungry vagina with it's sharp teeth between it's lips that bite, emotions, negroes, animals, death...

Quote :

I agree that the decay is very visible in books as well. I tend to like movies and books much more who were made by people who grew up before the 60s happened. Although the 60s to me are only the beginning of a new small cycle within a bigger cycle which both lead to decay in western culture. I'm curious if we are going to 'bottom out' with the upcoming intermediate cycle low or if there is still much rope left on the way down.

That's why I find the "New Right" more promising than mere "Conservativism" (which would be the Old Right within the political spectrum, the Romney kind in the US...)

Quote :

Quote:
Most German intellectuals are like that.

I'd say it's enhanced by an environment after WW2 where guilt is/was en vogue.
Also a great tool for creating a self-censoring public.
Germans are fierce people under their hood. All that will blow up at some point.
No peace, love and understanding no more.

I cannot see any of this last part as of yet.

Quote :

"Quote:
Check out Crowley. I think he was a Libra.

To learn from an 'airy' person?"

Yes.

Quote :

Astrology to me, was a door into a realm where I read about different types of people and to get an understanding about people who are very different from me in their temperament.
It's like an old map to navigate the ocean of personalities, to understand more about others and also a guide to reflect about oneself.

Same here.

Quote :

I do think I have a weakness in Air but not in the sense that I want to correct it but that it's just a quality of me. (At least that's what I believe now). So I have a tendency to not be structured. I also have not much appreciation for civilizational structures, like ethics or morals in the civic sense. I realize their advantages and disadvantages (some of them) but I am not focused on it. I am about the smaller group and the dynamics within that.

Air represents the "Live lightly" motto. Conan the Barbarian seems very airy to me. But also his few lines are very spot on intellectually. So I'd locate him between Air and Fire, with Earths noble spirit and maybe a longing for transcendence as in water.

Someone who has a weakness in "Air" would be a dark and depressed type. Kind of like the stereotypical (!) buddhist monk. (The original Buddha of course had no term for monk, but only had devotees. The clergy like with Jesus degenerated his original teachings into a Religion/Politics to suppress people and live a decadent life themselves or at least survive comfortably without much genetic potential to survive in physical battle.)

Quote :

Crowley, hm - wasn't he a founder of the whole Thelema thing?
I'd be more of an Austin Osman Spare reader.
All in all that was quite some time ago, when I read a bit about those things.

I will look into him. Sorry for wasting your time with the other author.

But thanks for this inspirational topic, I might use the aquarius timequality to do some creative writing of my own. Time is art.

And welcome amongst the Perioeci!
Back to top Go down
Satyr
Daemon
avatar

Gender : Male Pisces Posts : 14423
Join date : 2009-08-24
Age : 51
Location : Flux

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:51 pm

No, we are dealing with an inversion her. as we are living in a Nihilistic age.

What we call progress is the breaking down of resistance to change...to entropy.
It is conservative in that it wants to conserve what occurs with no effort.

What we call conservative is really revolutionary, masculine, in that it wishes to resist the natural flow of decay and establish some order.

_________________
γνῶθι σεαυτόν
μηδέν άγαν
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://satyr.canadian-forum.com/
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:06 am

Quote :
And welcome amongst the Perioeci!

And a Hello to you too. Suspect
-heh
You are an airy person? Because you seem to be gregarious and and have a vast array of interests. I guess there is almost nothing under the sun (and even beyond that) which isn't of interest to you - at least for a short duration of time.

Quote :
Someone who has a weakness in "Air" would be a dark and depressed type.
Water calls Air shallow. Air calls Water murky.
Earth calls Fire irresponsible. Fire calls Earth boring.
It depends on perspective and how much, how little.

I don't know much about buddhist monks. They do not travel 'lightly'? I guess it's time for a change in diet or getting rid of some of their stuff......or grow more muscles.
So from your words about buddhist monks I take it you are interested in buddhism but not in the stereotypical buddhism but in the 'true' buddhism or something like that.

Quote :
Females are nature. Nature is shunned.
Nature is shunned? Depends on what your words are talking about. Certain aspects of 'nature' are glorified while others are being eradicated (tried to be).

Save the planet, save the whales - good thing, we love nature.
Be in touch with your feminine side (certain aspects of it) - good thing, let's call it even reasonable or whatever 'good' words there are.
Individuals who are excelling and are not sponsored by government money, like entrepreneurs, the few who rose to power - bad thing, those greedy bastards!
...

Females are nature?, hm, I'd say they are a part of it but not all of it. Feminine is about being and masculine is about becoming.


Conan, from the books:

"Hither came Conan, the Cimmerian, black-haired, sullen-eyed, sword in hand, a thief, a reaver, a slayer, with gigantic melancholies and gigantic mirth, to tread the jeweled thrones of the Earth under his sandalled feet."

"Conan sensed their uncertainty and grinned mirthlessly and ferociously. "Who dies first?"

"This day you become knights!" he laughed fiercely, pointing with his dripping sword towards the hillmen horses, herded nearby. "Mount and follow me to hell!"


Conan is full of life and energy because he does what he is supposed to do. He's not bound by civilization's rules of conduct. If it's in his nature he'll do it.
He's often in conflict with authorities because he rises in status within a group quite fast and comes into conflict with the established structures.

Put a melancholic person to a task where he can build, create and he will be content.
Put a sanguine person in a room with new people and new things to discover, the more exotic the better and he will be content.
Give a choleric person a chance to be special and he will try to shine without much regard for his own safety.
...

Conan does not live lightly in the sense that he's free of care. If he chooses to care then he will do it no matter the obstacle, the cost. It's even a challenge and thus he is content. If he chooses to not care then "To hell with it!"
I'd say he is quite a choleric (Fire) temperament in that regard.

A sanguine (Air) person in modern life feels right at home at a party and with most people.
But at a party in a less civilized environment he'd probably feel less comfortable - less.
Howard describes him quite well in symbols, he's like a panther, a big cat, a lion, Fire.
But outside of civilization when he's alone, he is more melancholic(Earth).
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:43 am

Quote :
Refreshing? How is conservativism refreshing?

Forgot that.

Duh, because you look cooler in a BMW than riding on a bicycle because you want to save the planet.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Sat Feb 16, 2013 8:35 am

There is no true Buddhism. (Like Jesus, the Buddha didn't want to start a Religion.) There is just the original doctrine of the Buddha. (Which is hardly found today, because even most 'scholars' rely on sectarian commentary and what their gurus or rinpoches tell them.) And original doctrine is not even very original either. I see some parallels between the Buddha and Socrates (who I know only little), in the Sutras. The Buddha had a style of letting people find their own "enlightenment" (or simply anwers on what to do in many cases).

Muscles... I have to say Schwarzenegger looked great. Here the Arabs emphasize their masculinity this way.

Buddhism... so today in the Kali Yuga, Evola proposes the Tantra. It's an indian way of meditation/exercise that includes the body. It has been adapted in Vajrayana "buddhism" as well. It's far from Buddhas doctrinal teachings, but suitable because it includes the body as well.

Evola has this little chapter on Jazz-Music in "Ride the Tiger". I talked to a Jazz trumpeter and he of course made an enthusiastic case for Jazz. He says that classical music misses some moll chord, which signifies life itself. Therefor classical music is intellectual and he called it lifeless. (Which it isn't, he is just a negro worshipping liberal, but has some knowledge about music.) But he also distinguished film music from this. He said film music (movie music, scores) is based in Jazz. Evola would call it more corporeal and also point to the lesser side of it, the decay. But it's suitable for our time. (The Kali Yuga of course is a very long time cycle, why I'd go by Spengler's tables, who subdivides smaller cylcles.)

So today you might have to include the body too, to free the mind. Why cinema is the most complete artform, because it directly engages more senses than a book, a painting or an audio recording, by themselves.

Quote :

Females are nature?, hm, I'd say they are a part of it but not all of it. Feminine is about being and masculine is about becoming.

Why isn't the male about "being" too? I don't know. It's screwed up in our times. What is a man? What is a woman? I'd first start with the man and say masculinity is resistance to entropy. So a monk in this sense is manly, But a man who deals with women (like Conan), even has a wife and children, is more manly, IF he is in this setting also able to resist entropy (get her to truly submit to him and achieve his lifes goals). So I stand by my statement: "Females are nature. "And men have to see, how much of nature they can confront and dominate. Most men in their young age are very confident and do not measure their weaknesses. Of course one shouldn't focus on ones the weaknesses, but know them. Like Conan said in the 2nd movie, I am paraphrasing: "What good is steel ( a sword ) against magic?", to a question: why he is afraid of magic, by this evil queen.

Another problem with Tantra (or Vajrayana) is that you need a teacher! You cannot do it by yourself. So you have to deal with people: liberals, leftistists, feminists, new agers ... If you want to achieve a goal. In other words: you have to join or at least visit a group.

Quote :

Individuals who are excelling and are not sponsored by government money, like entrepreneurs, the few who rose to power - bad thing, those greedy bastards!

I liked the Atlas Shrugged movie, even if it got terrible critique on Counter-Currents. I am surprised a movie like this is made at all.

Especially the bureaucracy is immense here.

Sorry for (seemingly) jumping all over the place in this post. In tibetan language: woman is called "being of lesser birth" and man "being of higher birth". They knew or know what women are: embodied entropy, beings without a will (to order). But they are overly scared of them. And like the Arabs tend to lock them away too much. Westerners are more self confident and granting women more freedom. Maybe too much. One is always more reluctant to see the own blind spot.

Today the Alpha Males are the ones all women flock too. So if you want ONE woman, you kind of have to find a way to attract all of them, which then makes you aware of what women are (in the process) and you back off (a little, depending on your strength/weakness, of how much entropy/nature/feminine you can face.).

Masculinity is Linearity.

In tibetan Vajrayana you have people claiming a lineage of mere oral transmission by the Buddha, how they arrived at their teachings. An unbroken lineage of tulkus (reincarnated Lamas). The Indians only even more loosely refer to the Buddha, if at all. Which kind of let's them stuck in some Brahman theology. (Nihilism towards the one, instead of towards the zero, which are both tools in my opinion, but I will write on that in another topic.)
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Sat Feb 16, 2013 12:02 pm

I've only read so far in Evola's "Yoga of Power", but there is this female energy Shakti, which is all underlying, even more basic than Shiva. (Or even Brahman from some viewpoint, he states.) I make of it, that engaging the (pure) female element makes you a man (yoga tantra may be a tool). This energy.

Maleness is linear energy. (But the energy, comes from a female source.)

You have to tap that source. That's why there is no theory about women, only praxis.

Yoga has the advantage, that you get to experience the pure female energy. (It kind of makes women boring, compared. But it helps.)

Why there are so many women in indian tantra, I wonder. It's a very feminist, lesbian breed. In tibetan yoga, you find modern women, but not those extreme feminists.

That's why education is important for me too. You can't go wrong reading the right texts, but you might also miss out on some development, that involves corporeal experiences, that you only get through guided meditations/exercises.
Back to top Go down
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:19 am

Quote :
There is no true Buddhism. (Like Jesus, the Buddha didn't want to start a Religion.) There is just the original doctrine of the Buddha. (Which is hardly found today, because even most 'scholars' rely on sectarian commentary and what their gurus or rinpoches tell them.) And original doctrine is not even very original either. I see some parallels between the Buddha and Socrates (who I know only little), in the Sutras. The Buddha had a style of letting people find their own "enlightenment" (or simply anwers on what to do in many cases).

I don't know very much about Buddhism. Do you have to shave your head to be one of them? Wink

Quote :
Muscles... I have to say Schwarzenegger looked great. Here the Arabs emphasize their masculinity this way.

The muscles about him I don't find that special. I'm more fascinated with his success in modern life. To quote from Bill Burr (a great philosopher) Get to america, become a famous bodybuilder. Become a moviestar although you don't even speak the language. Stop there? 'No', he said, 'I'm gonna marry into american royalty. I'm gonna marry a Kennedy.' He did that - but not satisfied - I'm gonna become guvenur. And he did it. Easy. ...

Anyway, the Conan movies don't really capture the spirit of the books. Conan's strong because he lives in a world where he needs to be strong to manifest his will in reality by brute force. Though that's only part of him. Cunning is another quality. He knows himself, like knowthyself - and that self is hungry for certain things and there are no civilized morals who bind him - only physical realities and his own self.

He's a drifter in his young years who eventually ends up having his own kingdom, although he didn't plan for it. And once he has it, he's not that content. He doesn't like to be king, he'd prefer to have less of a burden and be a drifter again but he feels compelled to care for those people. He rules his kingdom like you'd expect a clan leader to rule his own people. He does it more by inspiring them and to let them fight for the protection of their own families and property not for some idea of a kingdom.

Quote :
Why isn't the male about "being" too?


There is masculinity and femininity in a man as there is both in a woman. It's about degree. Modern times would like to destroy masculinity in individuals because its law is that there shall only be one, one center of order, one ideal to bow to. One entity to harness all of the material. The material, the body, being.

The male, the man has his own body and he is his own body. He is, as in being, his own body. Read again. Man like woman is, as in being, his/her own body.

The body, as in being, is of feminine quality. The will* which springs from the body can harness the body and its energies.

Bodies do decay, they wither away, they fall to the ground are fertile again for some new life, for some new being to come forth. Masculinity is the force which seeks to fight entropy, it's like small bastions in an ocean of material entropy. These focal points (living beings) harness and use the materials around them, use their own bodies, to struggle against entropy. Masculine and feminine are in a struggle.

*I am not sure about that word. My ideas (which of course borrow from Satyr who in turn borrows from other famous authors who are unfortunately not read very much today) on those things are far from finished, I am not content with them - but so far that's what I came up with right now.

Quote :
Especially the bureaucracy is immense here.
Yes, bureaucrazy like democrazy is rampant. Good. A sign of resistance.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Lyssa
Har Har Harr
avatar

Gender : Female Posts : 9035
Join date : 2012-03-01
Location : The Cockpit

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:07 pm


_________________


"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://ow.ly/RLQvm
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:40 am

Mark Schultz
"Conan has achieved a sort of iconic status which unfortunately carries with it a gross simplification of the complexities of the character as originally written by his creator, the massively talented Robert E. Howard.

Howard created Conan, and the genre that later came to be called “sword and sorcery,” not simply as venues for bloody action, but as expressions of his views on life, history, and society. That he could disguise his philosophical musings within rousing good adventure and compelling character was but one aspect of his talent.

The one-note depiction of Conan as snarling, mindless killing machine has become short-hand for the character and, unfortunately, the only aspect recognized by the wider public. It’s a powerful, dramatic aspect in a commercial sense—and one too easily returned to by illustrators aping their predecessors—but does a disservice to the richness of the character as written by Howard.

I’ve tried in my depictions of Conan to always refer back to the descriptions of his creator. Howard wrote him as a triumph of pure merit over established societal mores."

From "Illustrating Conan", Link

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:49 am











Mark Schultz, some of the cover and interior art for the first of Wandering Star's Conan collections, Conan of Cimmeria: Volume One (1932-1933) (2003), also published by Del Rey as The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian (2003, 2005).


Last edited by Anfang on Sun May 31, 2015 8:47 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Nov 28, 2013 9:27 am

[img(800px,1093px]http://i56.servimg.com/u/f56/18/24/63/29/frank-10.jpg[/img]







Frank Frazetta, some of his artwork on Conan


Last edited by Anfang on Sun May 31, 2015 8:40 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:22 pm

This is a good thread. I was thinking of making a Conan thread, but you beat me to the punch.

I haven't read any of the books from R.E. Howard; I've seen the movies with Arnold and the recent one with Jason Momoa. I liked the recent one, but the older ones with Arnold were much better.

I'll have to read the books sometimes, too.



"What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women!".
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:14 pm

Robert E. Howard has a special place in my heart.  The man was a writing genius in fiction.
Back to top Go down
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Tue Jun 24, 2014 12:55 pm

Erik wrote:
I'll have to read the books sometimes, too.

The books are basically the collection of the short stories which got published by Howard for next to nothing (at least in the beginning) in various fiction magazines in the 1930s.

In 'The Phoenix on the Sword', Chapter II, Howard wrote:
The room was large and ornate, with rich tapestries on the polished-panelled walls, deep rugs on the ivory floor, and with the lofty ceiling adorned with intricate carvings and silver scrollwork. Behind an ivory, gold-inlaid writing-table sat a man whose broad shoulders and sun-browned skin seemed out of place among those luxuriant surroundings. He seemed more a part of the sun and winds and high places of the outlands. His slightest movement spoke of steel-spring muscles knit to a keen brain with the co-ordination of a born fighting-man. There was nothing deliberate or measured about his actions. Either he was perfectly at rest – still as a bronze statue – or else he was in motion, not with the jerky quickness of over-tense nerves, but with a cat-like speed that blurred the sight which tried to follow him.
His garments were of rich fabric, but simply made. He wore no ring or ornaments, and his square-cut black mane was confined merely by a cloth-of-silver band about his head.
Now he laid down the golden stylus with which he had been laboriously scrawling on waxed papyrus, rested his chin on his fist, and fixed his smoldering blue eyes enviously on the man who stood before him. This person was occupied in his own affairs at the moment, for he was taking up the laces of his gold-chased armor, and abstractedly whistling – a rather unconventional performance, considering that he was in the presence of a king.
“Prospero,” said the man at the table, “these matters of statecraft weary me as all the fighting I have done never did.”
“All part of the game, Conan,” answered the dark-eyed Poitainian. “You are king – you must play the part.”
“I wish I might ride with you to Nemedia,” said Conan enviously. “It seems ages since I had a horse between my knees – but Publius says that affairs in the city require my presence. Curse him!
“When I overthrew the old dynasty,” he continued, speaking with the easy familiarity which existed only between the Poitainian and himself, “it was easy enough, though it seemed bitter hard at the time. Looking back now over the wild path I followed, all those days of toil, intrigue, slaughter and tribulation seem like a dream.
“I did not dream far enough, Prospero. When King Numedides lay dead at my feet and I tore the crown from his gory head and set it on my own, I had reached the ultimate border of my dreams. I had prepared myself to take the crown, not to hold it. In the old free days all I wanted was a sharp sword and a straight path to my enemies. Now no paths are straight and my sword is useless.
“When I overthrew Numedides, then I was the Liberator – now they spit at my shadow. They have put a statue of that swine in the temple of Mitra, and people go and wail before it, hailing it as the holy effigy of a saintly monarch who was done to death by a red-handed barbarian. When I led her armies to victory as a mercenary, Aquilonia overlooked the fact that I was a foreigner, but now she can not forgive me.
“Now in Mitra’s temple there come to burn incense to Numedides’ memory, men whom his hangmen maimed and blinded, men whose sons died in his dungeons, whose wives and daughters were dragged into his seraglio. The fickle fools!”
“Rinaldo is largely responsible,” answered Prospero, drawing up his sword-belt another notch. “He sings songs that make men mad. Hang him in his jester’s garb to the highest tower in the city. Let him make rimes for the vultures.”
Conan shook his lion head. “No, Prospero, he’s beyond my reach. A great poet is greater than any king. His songs are mightier than my scepter; for he has near ripped the heart from my breast when he chose to sing for me. I shall die and be forgotten, but Rinaldo’s songs will live for ever.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Anfang

avatar

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 1989
Join date : 2013-01-23
Age : 33
Location : CET

PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard) Thu Jun 26, 2014 8:52 am

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard)

Back to top Go down
 
Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard)
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Comics and Conan the Barbarian (R.E.Howard)
» DWIGHT HOWARD FANTASY
» Howard Mitchell says Hi!
» 1st Battalion The Green Howards
» Jenkins in Bad Oeynhausen

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Know Thyself :: AGORA :: THEATER-
Jump to: