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 William Blake - The voice of the Devil

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Anfang



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PostSubject: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:44 pm

from the poetry The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

The voice of the devil.


All Bibles or sacred codes, have been the causes of the following Errors.

1. That Man has two real existing principles Viz: a Body & a Soul.
2. That Energy, call'd Evil, is alone from the Body, & that Reason, call'd Good, is alone from the Soul.
3. That God will torment Man in Eternity for following his Energies.

But the following Contraries to these are True.

1. Man has no Body distinct from his Soul; for that call'd Body is a portion of Soul discern'd by the five Senses, the chief inlets of Soul in this age.
2. Energy is the only life and is from the Body and Reason is the bound or outward circumference of Energy.
3. Energy is Eternal Delight.
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:46 pm

'That Man has two real existing principles Viz: a Body & a Soul.' - Probably the single greatest influence on everybody that has lived since it got popular.

'That Energy, call'd Evil, is alone from the Body, & that Reason, call'd Good, is alone from the Soul.' - The body is evil in what it tells you to do, how to be - seems like a precursor to all the ideology trumps nature reasoning that followed. Like how reason is called 'good', I am reasonable therefore I am good. Yes, please I want to be good, wouldn't want to be evil... Rolling Eyes

'That God will torment Man in Eternity for following his Energies.' - Definitely gonna listen to that 'god' he sounds like the master I always wanted to serve. On a serious note, in my views you can serve whoever you wish, or try to serve as little as possible but don't obscure the matter as it is done on a broad basis almost everywhere.

'Man has no Body distinct from his Soul; for that call'd Body is a portion of Soul discern'd by the five Senses, the chief inlets of Soul in this age.' - I'm not sure but I think he uses the words soul and body here in a way which makes them perfectly interchangable. As a simple mind, I find this to be very good, can't comment on complicated minds..

'Energy is the only life and is from the Body and Reason is the bound or outward circumference of Energy.' - With that one I'm not sure what to make of it, the first part resonates with my kind of truth, the second part, hm, is his reason the human consciousness? The ego, the thing which believes or is told from the outside (I'm not sure about that) that it is more than a creation of my body?

'Energy is Eternal Delight.' Who was the woman he just bedded before writing that part?



William Blake was born 1757 and made good poetry, although I don't know much other poetry...
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:34 pm

I like Lecome de Lisle, and that whole genre of Parnassian poems.
I had a lovely collection translated by a friend, but lost them when my hard disk crashed.
That's that.

I'm tempted to restart; thanks for the reminder.


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:10 pm

Le come, what a dirty old man that one had to be!
Too perfect to be unintentional, you spelled it that way on purpose, didn't you? hah, You heighten my spirit - or lower it? - it's good to me either way.

It looks like the French not only make good wine (and surprisingly inexpensive if you buy it there - or so I have heard, ehm) but also good poetry. Both go probably hand in hand. For the reader AND writer, I claim...

I guess I'll be fine with two maybe three poets in my life time - how are people reading all that? There is so much time, hours and days which can be spent with a single one - definitely have to cut back on the 6 hours TV/day thing. Neutral Yeah I wish that'd have been a joke now too. ; )
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Wed Mar 06, 2013 5:00 pm

"Rintrah roars & shakes his fires in the burden'd air;
hungry clouds swag on the deep, once meek, and in a perilous path,
the just man kept his course along the vale of death.
Roses are planted where thorns grow, and on the barren heath
sing the honey bees, then the perilous path was planted:
and a riverland a spring on every cliff and tomb:
and on the bleached bones red clay brought forth.
Till the villain left the paths of ease, to walk in perilous paths,
and drive the just man into barren climes.
Now the sneaking serpent walks in mild humility,
and the just man rages in the wilds where lions roam.
Rintrah roars & shakes his fires in the burden'd air;
hungry clouds swag on the deep."

"The perilous path was traveled exclusively by the just man, but he was displaced by “the villain” from “the paths of ease,” leading to the current situation in which “the sneaking serpent walks/ in mild humility” and the just man “rages in the wild.”"

_________________
"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Wed Mar 06, 2013 5:01 pm

Anfang wrote:
Le come, what a dirty old man that one had to be!
Too perfect to be unintentional, you spelled it that way on purpose, didn't you? hah, You heighten my spirit - or lower it? - it's good to me either way.

It's too high to get over
Too low to get under
You're stuck in the middle
And the pain is thunder

lol

My subconscious is all exposed!... its time I changed my location...

Quote :
It looks like the French not only make good wine (and surprisingly inexpensive if you buy it there - or so I have heard, ehm) but also good poetry. Both go probably hand in hand. For the reader AND writer, I claim...

Are you a poet/writer? There's Baudelaire too. I know next to nothing about wine or the French or the history of the symbolists - language is a barrier; I have to start an introductory book on that one. I like this intro:

"In Leconte de Lisle the Parnassian movement seems to crystallize. His verse is clear, sonorous, dignified, deliberate in movement, classically correct in rhythm, full of exotic local colour, of savage names, of realistic rhetoric. It has its own kind of romance, in its "legend of the ages," so different from Hugo's, so much fuller of scholarship and the historic sense, yet with far less of human pity. Coldness cultivated as a kind of artistic distinction seems to turn all his poetry to marble, in spite of the fire at its heart. Most of Leconte de Lisle's poems are little chill epics, in which legend is fossilized. They have the lofty monotony of a single conception of life and of the universe. He sees the world as what Byron called it, "a glorious blunder", and desires only to stand a little apart from the throng, meditating scornfully.
The interval which is his he accepts with something of the defiance of his own Cain, refusing to fill it with the triviality of happiness, waiting even upon beauty with a certain inflexible austerity. He listens and watches, throughout the world, for echoes and glimpses of great tragic passions, languid with fire in the East, a tumultuous conflagration in the Middle Ages, a sombre darkness in the heroic ages of the North. The burning emptiness of the desert attracts him, the inexplicable melancholy of the dogs that bark at the moon; he would interpret the jaguar's dreams, the sleep of the condor. He sees nature with the same wrathful impatience as man, praising it for its destructive energies, its haste to crush out human life before the stars fall into chaos, and the world with them, as one of the least of stars. He sings the "Dies Irae" exultingly; only seeming to desire an end of God as well as of man, universal nothingness. He conceives that he does well to be angry, and this anger is indeed the personal note of his pessimism; but it leaves him somewhat apart from the philosophical poets, too fierce for wisdom and not rapturous enough for poetry."

Quote :
I guess I'll be fine with two maybe three poets in my life time - how are people reading all that? There is so much time, hours and days which can be spent with a single one - definitely have to cut back on the 6 hours TV/day thing. Neutral Yeah I wish that'd have been a joke now too. ; )

I watch 0 TV and still have no time. I have to take a break soon.
3 poets; who?

_________________
"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]


Last edited by Lyssa on Mon Apr 22, 2013 1:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Thu Mar 07, 2013 6:01 am

Quote :
Are you a poet/writer?

No.

Quote :
I know next to nothing about wine or the French or the history of the symbolists - language is a barrier

I don't know much about wine either but I know what I like. The French are a foolish bunch in their hearts - lions. I hope such traits can slumber safely and reawaken at some point, in some way. My French is very rusty - no training. I just barely can extract the meaning of an advanced text within context.

3 poets
I like Lord Byron, W.B. Yeats and William Blake. But again, I am not knowledgeable in those areas - yet I know what I like and what I don't like.

Speaking of which, Eliot, to me, is like moving the back of your finger nails slowly over some blackboard. A few lines were enough for me - I had to retreat. (silly but has happened)

Oh and the 6 hours are now probably down to about 3 hours per week by now. ; )
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Thu Mar 07, 2013 9:59 am




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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:41 am

"Without Contraries is no progression. Attraction and Repulsion, Reason and Energy, Love and Hate, are necessary to Human existence.

From these contraries spring what the religious call Good & Evil. Good is the passive that obeys Reason. Evil is the active springing from Energy.

Good is Heaven. Evil is Hell"


A war to end all wars, the war to prepare the end of existence, how fitting of a name for the World War. The one to end all future struggle and thus life. Good obeys Reason - Being, the material obeys the absolute Truth? Being as in spiritless material obeys the absolute Truth. THE Truth, the one to end it all.

Evil is the active, the becoming, the spirit which is looking for power. Spirit is struggling with being, with the material, it cannot escape it. It would become absolute, a stagnant pointless thing, no heading towards anything. Would swallow itself.


There is so much heart for me in his work.
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:43 am


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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:03 pm

Anfang wrote:
Quote :
Are you a poet/writer?

No.

Quote :
I know next to nothing about wine or the French or the history of the symbolists - language is a barrier

I don't know much about wine either but I know what I like. The French are a foolish bunch in their hearts - lions. I hope such traits can slumber safely and reawaken at some point, in some way. My French is very rusty - no training. I just barely can extract the meaning of an advanced text within context.

3 poets
I like Lord Byron, W.B. Yeats and William Blake. But again, I am not knowledgeable in those areas - yet I know what I like and what I don't like.

Speaking of which, Eliot, to me, is like moving the back of your finger nails slowly over some blackboard. A few lines were enough for me - I had to retreat. (silly but has happened)

Oh and the 6 hours are now probably down to about 3 hours per week by now. ; )

I like Blake as an artist, than a poet-philosopher. He was more between good and evil, than beyond.
Check out Ulver on youtube.

Homer and Shakespeare and those ancient ones are truly rich. You are right; you take one line and you can meditate on it for hours. Byron, Yeats, and the logical next would have been Shelley...? Holderlin too.

TV's only good for world-cinema.


_________________
"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Wed Mar 13, 2013 4:24 am

I'd like to read it all. Shelley, Hölderlin they all sound good to me.
I'd want so much more time...

I'm always getting wary when things get out of touch with the ground, the physical reality and become too abstract, only occupying head space with all links seemingly severed with the outside. Not my permanent residence.
I don't appreciate most modern literature - don't understand it or don't want to. Kind of horrifies me - haha.. no, it really does Neutral

Around 1750 to 1850 is a time period I'm very attracted to in the realm of literary - it seems.

What I read from Blake is Marriage of Heaven and Hell and Songs of Innocence and Experience, I have his other works in a collection book but haven't read them - they look too much like his take on christian morals - even more than Marriage of H.a.H. , or in a different fashion.
I never was interested in a detailed analysis of those morals, looking at it from an outside perspective - Yes, but not really interested in the internal mechanics.

world-cinema - I like that creation.
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Wed Jun 19, 2013 3:49 am




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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Wed Jun 19, 2013 3:50 am

Proverbs of Hell.

In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy.
Drive your cart and your plow over the bones of the dead.
The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.
Prudence is a rich ugly old maid courted by Incapacity.
He who desires but acts not, breeds pestilence.
The cut worm forgives the plow.
Dip him in the river who loves water.
A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees.
He whose face gives no light, shall never become a star.
Eternity is in love with the productions of time.
The busy bee has no time for sorrow.
The hours of folly are measur'd by the clock, but of wisdom: no clock can measure.
All wholsom food is caught without a net or a trap.
Bring out number weight & measure in a year of dearth.
No bird soars too high, if he soars with his own wings.
A dead body revenges not injuries.
The most sublime act is to set another before you.
If the fool would persist in his folly he would become wise.
Folly is the cloke of knavery.
Shame is Prides cloke.

Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion.
The pride of the peacock is the glory of God.
The lust of the goat is the bounty of God.
The wrath of the lion is the wisdom of God.
The nakedness of woman is the work of God.
Excess of sorrow laughs. Excess of joy weeps.
The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the stormy sea, and the destructive sword, are portions of eternity too great for the eye of man.
The fox condemns the trap, not himself.
Joys impregnate. Sorrows bring forth.
Let man wear the fell of the lion. woman the fleece of the sheep.
The bird a nest, the spider a web, man friendship.
The selfish smiling fool, & the sullen frowning fool shall be both thought wise, that they may be a rod.
What is now proved was once only imagin'd.
The rat, the mouse, the fox, the rabbet; watch the roots; the lion, the tyger, the horse, the elephant, watch the fruits.
The cistern contains: the fountain overflows.
One thought fills immensity.
Always be ready to speak your mind, and a base man will avoid you.
Every thing possible to be believ'd is an image of truth.
The eagle never lost so much time, as when he submitted to learn of the crow.


The fox provides for himself. but God provides for the lion.
Think in the morning. Act in the noon. Eat in the evening. Sleep in the night.
He who has suffer'd you to impose on him knows you.
As the plow follows words, so God rewards prayers.
The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.
Expect poison from the standing water.
You never know what is enough unless you know what is more than enough.
Listen to the fools reproach! it is a kingly title!
The eyes of fire, the nostrils of air, the mouth of water, the beard of earth.
The weak in courage is strong in cunning.
The apple tree never asks the beech how he shall grow; nor the lion, the horse, how he shall take his prey.
The thankful reciever bears a plentiful harvest.
If others had not been foolish, we should be so.
The soul of sweet delight can never be defil'd.
When thou seest an Eagle, thou seest a portion of Genius. lift up thy head!
As the catterpiller chooses the fairest leaves to lay her eggs, so the priest lays his curse on the fairest joys.
To create a little flower is the labour of ages.
Damn braces: Bless relaxes.
The best wine is the oldest, the best water the newest.
Prayers plow not! Praises reap not!
Joys laugh not! Sorrows weep not!


The head Sublime, the heart Pathos, the genitals Beauty, the hands & feet Proportion.
As the air to a bird or the sea to a fish, so is contempt to the contemptible.
The crow wish'd every thing was black, the owl, that every thing was white.
Exuberance is Beauty.
If the lion was advised by the fox. he would be cunning.
Improvement makes strait roads, but the crooked roads without Improvement, are roads of Genius.
Sooner murder an infant in its cradle than nurse unacted desires.
Where man is not, nature is barren.
Truth can never be told so as to be understood, and not be believ'd.
Enough! or Too much.
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:19 pm


_________________
"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]
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PostSubject: Re: William Blake - The voice of the Devil   Tue Jun 25, 2013 3:04 pm

I think Blake is good when using his intuition, his senses and unconscious.
- "The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction."

But when he thinks about thoughts of other thinkers then the spell breaks for me.

I like that one from Songs of Innocence and Experience -

The Clod and the Pebble

"Love seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell's despair."

So sung a little Clod of Clay
Trodden with the cattle's feet,
But a Pebble of the brook
Warbled out these metres meet:

"Love seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another's loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven's despite."
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