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Cold Weasel

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PostSubject: Honoring an ancestor Wed Apr 09, 2014 8:23 am

Tonight I want to celebrate and meditate on my paternal great-great-great-grandfather.

Can you guess which one he is?

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"Anti-Horsethief Association."
"This was a meeting of the Men who stayed after those horse thieves.  They met at Old Piney School regularly to plot actions against theft in the area.  Horses were necessary in those days."
 

In the past couple of years I've gotten a little into genealogy, and have contacted members of my extended family who have been helpful in finding records and photos.  This info comes mostly from one relative, who presented a document I'll take excerpts from.  

Quote :
By 1862, the war between the states had developed and John left his home in June to enlist in the Confederate Army.  He served in the Infantry . . . until the Spring of 1863.  He then contacted [sic] Measles and was released from the Army at Pine Bluff, Arkansas.  John made his way home to Rusk, Texas, on foot, hiding in the woods for days with fever so high he was delirious and had lost all track of time.  He had to swim the Red River and probably several other creeks and streams before he finally arrived at Rusk.  He remained home until the Autumn of 1863.  At this time, he joined the Calvary [sic] . . . and served till the end of the Civil War in 1865.  He was Honorably Discharged at Fort Bend County, Richmond, Texas.  During the three years in the Army he was only slightly wounded in the right arm while fighting in the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas.  

. . .

Before 1870, John and Jane [his wife] moved to Arkansas . . . Eleven children were born to Jane and John by 1889.  . . . On December 31, 1889, Jane died at the age of 43, suffering from breast cancer.  . . . John moved to Indian Territory in what is now Zafra, Oklahoma.  He settled on Mountain Fork River and lived on a large farm with his children until the age of about 70.  He then left the farm to live with his son, Joe, at Zafra, Oklahoma.  On Monday, February 19, 1934, John died a natural death, of old age.  He was 90 years, 3 months and 8 days old.  He had fifty-three grandchildren and fifty-four great-grandchildren at the time of his death.  

The newspaper was quoted as writing “Monday, February 19, saw the passing of another Confederate Soldier and old settler of the highlands, and eastern Oklahoma, and known to hundreds of friends throughout the county as “Uncle John.”

Quote :
John was many things – a Christian early in life, a dedicated
family man, a devoted soldier, a talented Blacksmith, and a wise woodsman
knowledgeable about natures bounty, using its herbs, tree barks, etc, to
heal both man and animal.  As his ancestors, we do respect
and lovingly honor his memory and that of his wife Jane.



Last year I went back to the other side of the planet and visited my Dad, who by chance has settled in the same area where our forefather lived, right next to the Mountain Fork River.  He is retired now and writing down all his memories and family lore that was passed down to him.  We talked for a long time and I recorded his voice.  

He and I went to the cemetery where my g-g-g-grandfather's grave is, and I took these photos of the Southern Iron Cross of Honor behind his headstone.  

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His headstone reads: "He stood tall."

 sunny 

====

There's a lot to think about when remembering your ancestors.  I reflect on the degeneration that I represent.  My father was of the last generation to have an intimate relationship to the land, to horses and other animals, and the ability to kill and prepare game, for example.  I am witness to the feminizing, dissolving effects of modernity--I mark the greatest break perhaps, between the old ways of my family and the truly post-modern ones.  

When I consider future children, I worry that it will be impossible to preserve an immediate sense of this heritage for them.  Especially with the world they will inherit.  Documentation, especially audio and video, will be important.  I want them to hear my Dad's voice telling them about their family.  

At the same time, if that fails, I like to think there is potential in my genes.  Looking back on this man gives me some pride, and sense of potential.  

====

Do you have any ancestors to share?  Let this be the thread for it.
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Satyr
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Wed Apr 09, 2014 11:39 am

The pagans worshiped their past, through their ancestors.

They preyed to their own dead, for guidance and strength.
They had no gods.
Their own ancestors were deified, sanctified.
Through them they connected with nature.

They gave thanks by visiting their graves and pouring wine on them, offering food as if they were still alive.

Modernity is this severing of man from his past.

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Cold Weasel

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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Fri Apr 11, 2014 10:48 pm

Satyr wrote:
The pagans worshiped their past, through their ancestors.

They preyed to their own dead, for guidance and strength.
They had no gods.
Their own ancestors were deified, sanctified.
Through them they connected with nature.

They gave thanks by visiting their graves and pouring wine on them, offering food as if they were still alive.

Modernity is this severing of man from his past.

As I've said once before, this idea is a big reason I felt interested in your writings, and this forum.

I think this gesture of honoring my ancestor is in reality pathetic. I am doing something that does not come naturally to me as a modern individual. It's more like a kind of role-playing: Doing what I suppose a pre-modern or pagan would do.

The real foundation for such gestures has crumbled. But where there is an interest in family genealogy, knowledge of the past can be preserved. The important thing to do now is connect with the older members of my family who are still alive, and gather information and memories from them.

Still, I feel insecure about my role in doing this thing. Does this turn me into a mere archivist? It seems an academic exercise. I must remember my pure motivations when gathering info. My Dad has pure motivations as well, though of course the one thing that rubs me wrong personally is the Christian sentimentalism permeating his writings.

The Christian identity, then, is another legacy to understand.
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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:53 pm

So which one was he CW?

I would say its not about "gathering info"; but expericing youself as the vitality of a long line. Not a passive awareness or even as an "instrument" to pass things on the future, but maybe looking at the 'archivist' in you as the same essence of what you are in search of. What you seek is the same drive making you to seek in the first place...  a long consciousness coming to awareness of itself, Living, embodying this vitality that they were...

Although it may look silly when you peep out the window, at the world outside, Your world begins indoors, and inside you. Family customs carried out with duty gradually turn into a sanctity that gradually turn into a vitality... they store the genii... the nurture the genius of a line.

A vitality is preserved with letting in little doses of novelty, wisdom informed by the time you live in.
When something is strong enough to walk hands-free, it no longer needs to clutch at the railings.
Where there is enough sanctity, Intellectual Conscience will weave itself without fear of going to threads...

A pagan hearth can shine out from inside even when the times outside are predominantly J.-Xt.
Intellectual integrity has to start at some generation and re-naturalize the way for the future even when one's ancestors that one respects and loves have been devout Xts.

Its easier not to feel silly when you find a like-minded partner of course.


Snyder wrote:
For most Americans, to reflect on "home place" would be an un-familiar exercise. Few today can announce themselves as someone from somewhere. Almost nobody spends a lifetime in the same valley, working alongside the people they knew as children. Native people everywhere (the very term means "someone born there") and Old World farmers and city people share this experience of living in place. Still—and this is very important to remember—being inhabitory, being place-based, has never meant that one didn't travel from time to time, going on trading ventures or taking livestock to summer grazing. Such working wanderers have always known they had a home-base on earth, and could prove it at any campfire or party by singing their own songs.

The heart of a place is the home, and the heart of the home is the firepit, the hearth. All tentative explorations go outward from there and it is back to the fireside that elders return. You grow up speaking a home language, a local vernacular. Your own household may have some specifics of phrase, of pronunciation, that are different from the domus, the jia or ie or kum, down the lane. You hear histories of the people who are your neighbors and tales involving rocks, streams, mountains, and trees that are all within your sight. The myths of world-creation tell you how that mountain was created and how that peninsula came to be there. As you grow bolder you explore your world outward from the firepit (which is the center of each universe) in little trips. The childhood landscape is learned on foot, and a map is inscribed in the mind—trails and pathways and groves— the mean dog, the cranky old man's house, the pasture with a bull in it—going out wider and farther. All of us carry within us a picture of the terrain that was learned roughly between the ages of six and nine. (It could as easily be an urban neighborhood as some rural scene.) You can almost totally recall the place you walked, played, biked, swam. Revisualizing that place with its smells and textures, walking through it again in your imagination, has a grounding and settling effect." [Practice of the Wild]

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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Satyr
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:59 pm

Cold Weasel wrote:


As I've said once before, this idea is a big reason I felt interested in your writings, and this forum.  

I think this gesture of honoring my ancestor is in reality pathetic.  I am doing something that does not come naturally to me as a modern individual.  It's more like a kind of role-playing:  Doing what I suppose a pre-modern or pagan would do.  

The real foundation for such gestures has crumbled.  But where there is an interest in family genealogy, knowledge of the past can be preserved.  The important thing to do now is connect with the older members of my family who are still alive, and gather information and memories from them.  

Still, I feel insecure about my role in doing this thing.  Does this turn me into a mere archivist?  It seems an academic exercise.  I must remember my pure motivations when gathering info.  My Dad has pure motivations as well, though of course the one thing that rubs me wrong personally is the Christian sentimentalism permeating his writings.    

The Christian identity, then, is another legacy to understand.  
Then shift your focus.
You ARE honoring your ancestors by remaining true to yourself.
Know Thyself is a dialogue with the past.

We indulge in rituals, in our daily life, which if we considered from a distance of objectivity would seem no less ridiculous.
A ritual is something we perform consistently, until it becomes second-nature.

For me the shift began by preying in my hour of need, not to some Jew God, but to my own ancestors.

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Cold Weasel

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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Mon Apr 14, 2014 6:41 pm

Lyssa wrote:
So which one was he CW?

I gave a little hint at the end. The headstone reads "He stood tall," and he literally did. He's the one on the far left. At least as tall as the one on the far right, who is one of his sons.

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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Tue Apr 15, 2014 10:45 am

Satyr wrote:
For me the shift began by preying in my hour of need, not to some Jew God, but to my own ancestors.

How did you come to first know your ancestors, Satyr?  As an American there's some deliberate amnesia that I've had to overcome in the culture itself.  I can't trace much of my family lines back any farther than the 17th century.  Since you're European maybe it was easier to reach farther back in recorded history?
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Tue Apr 15, 2014 10:48 am

You have more recorded history.

I had to skip to the ancients.
I realized that I was the conduit to the past.
They were present in me.
Introspection....know Thyself, filled in by first-hand and second-hand accounts.

For me it was a matter of being honest. Not to focus on the nice, flattering stuff
To look at the shameful stuff. To put it into context.

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PostSubject: Ancestry Mon Jun 30, 2014 4:53 pm

Anyone know any ways to figure out ones ancetral lineage from further away than just great grandparents or those you or anyone currently alive would have met in their lifetime. And I don't want to use record tracing programmes like Ancestry.com.
Does anyone have much knowledge of physical characteristics and typical race characteristics? I think Nordic people were tall, had fair hair and bright blue eyes. I don't know much else about the other races that invaded the British Isles.
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Thu Jul 03, 2014 9:26 am

Ancestry.com does not only have record-tracing services, which I use, they also have a DNA test, which I haven't. I don't understand why you wouldn't want to trace records.

I used 23andme's DNA test to find my paternal and maternal haplogroups. Recently I bought one for my mother and her brother, and my father as well. After getting the DNA test, go here to learn more about the genetic history:

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There is also the physical anthropology aspect.

This Facebook group I recently joined: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
People there will try to classify you by observing photos. They are serious about anthropology and don't tolerate trolls and time-wasters.

I found that what I knew of my genetic history was corroborated by the way they typed me based on my photos, before I told them my haplogroups.

This website has physical anthropological information--the different types/breeds/races of Europeans (maybe other races too). I am totally new to these classifications--it gets pretty academic--but it might be fun to practice.
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Thu Jul 03, 2014 9:37 am

I am classified as Nordic, and my paternal haplogroup, I1, is associated with Germanics as well and is considered more "indigenous" to northern Europe than other more common ones (the majority of European men are R1a or R1b).  It is a small minority in the British isles, but reaches 30% frequency in Scandinavia.  It developed even before the "Indo-Europeans" arrived (!).  Anyway, this narrows it down a bit--it means that paternally I'm descended from an Anglo-Saxons, or maybe a Dane, or maybe a Viking, or maybe a Norman, who settled in the British Isles, and not the "Celtic" peoples like the Welsh, the Irish, the Scottish highlanders, etc.

A lot depends on which discipline your terms come from.  "Celtic," for example, misleads people because it is primarily a linguistic term, not racial.  Then, physical anthropologists will use the term "Keltic" for a certain racial type which may or may not have anything to do with some peoples referred to as "Celtic."  I'm still confused by it.
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:09 pm

"To look at the shameful stuff. To put it into context."

Agreed.

A family member of mine became obsessed with the family trees...went back to before either side left Nova Scotia...found all manner of disreputable types hanging like rotten fruit (in a few cases, literally 'hanged').
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Thu Jul 10, 2014 8:44 am

Satyr wrote:
Know Thyself is a dialogue with the past.

We indulge in rituals, in our daily life, which if we considered from a distance of objectivity would seem no less ridiculous.
A ritual is something we perform consistently, until it becomes second-nature.

For me the shift began by preying in my hour of need, not to some Jew God, but to my own ancestors.

Red Ice Radio - Stephen A. McNallen - Ancestral Roots & Metagenetics
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:53 pm

My remaining links into certain lines of descent refuse to talk about ancestors. A lot of skeletons in the closet they say, being related to A. Hitler and everything.
The one noble act they could potentially do, they'd rather censor themselves into hiding from it.
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:54 pm

I honor my ancestors by increasing my own strength. I will honor them by procreating and continuing this tradition of strength. What is strong shall last, and what is weak shall perish. Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:58 pm

Strength is measured in time...longevity.

One honors his ancestors by honoring himself...by refusing to lower himself to a level of decay, of losing his dignity, and his pride.

One worships nature by worshiping himself as a natural agent.
Humbling himself before nature as one would before a god.
One worships gods through himself, through his blood, by worshiping his dead ancestors, now part of nature and still in self.

One is master when he masters himself.
He attracts unintentionally, as substance always attracts lower levels of mass.
The lesser gravitates towards the higher.

When one reaches one exposes need, desire, want...one exposes weakness, dependence.
Reaching pushes the other away, if it is equal or higher.
Real power attracts without ever reaching, or intending.

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PostSubject: Re: Honoring an ancestor Wed Oct 29, 2014 7:09 pm

Satyr wrote:
Strength is measured in time...longevity.

One honors his ancestors by honoring himself...by refusing to lower himself to a level of decay, of losing his dignity, and his pride.

One worships nature by worshiping himself as a natural agent.
Humbling himself before nature as one would before a god.
One worships gods through himself, through his blood, by worshiping his dead ancestors, now part of nature and still in self.

One is master when he masters himself.
He attracts unintentionally, as substance always attracts lower levels of mass.
The lesser gravitates towards the higher.

When one reaches one exposes need, desire, want...one exposes weakness, dependence.
Reaching pushes the other away, if it is equal or higher.
Real power attracts without ever reaching, or intending.  

"When not speaking to others, he wears a mask. If he can't lead, he goes alone. There is a solitude in him that is inaccessible to praise or blame. Then, see them flock to you, seeing your aloofness as confidence and your indifference as strength."

There is truth in this, because it cannot be learned unless it is learned the hard way. It is a price that has to be paid physically, through suffering, through the continuous cycle of the destruction of one's weaker self and the creation of a stronger self. An asceticism of this world, survival of the fittest, what is strong shall last and what is weak shall perish.

You will see weaker males mimic the stronger males, and females flock to the strongest male. If there are anybody's traits that rub off on you, or you have the desire to mimic another human, then you are female in some regard.

Our ancestors have paid the price for us. Such absolute, perfected masculinity would come to life as the trickster, the perfect soldier, and the model lover all in one.
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