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 Parodites' Daemon

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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:44 am

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"While the artist wants to stamp the eternal with the image of time, to extend the sphere of the living and perishing consciousness so as to encompass all the breadth of creation, mainly by way of realizing harmonies within the order of nature, the philosopher wants to stamp time with the image of the eternal, to contract his consciousness to a single point, to the ego, so as to encompass it by thought, mainly by dissolving those harmonies and relations, by introducing contrariety and antithesis into the orders of nature and thereby unriddling the impassioned and bodily existence in which he feels himself condemned back into the mute regions of thought. In this way he is afforded objectivity, a view beyond himself and the narrow bound of his egoic consciousness, so that he might comprehend the idea behind phenomenal appearance.
True morality, on the other hand, which has been only profaned by the mocking idols of merely human happiness and virtue, in comparison to whose ardor the truths of man are only velleity and convenience, wants neither to extend the border of the egoic consciousness or to contract it, but rather to contract the creation itself by realizing the principium individuationis, the essence of the will, by means of the will. Stimulated by the ideal ego through philosophy, by the thought of the eternal soul, the real ego aims to lay into it its fullness and life, and realizes a morality. All moral realities thereby inevitably create their own objects, as love creates beauty, hope creates happiness, and freedom creates justice. The moral problem is the problem of realizing in the image of the eternal the meaning of the struggle of time and mortality. When beheld with this hopeless and yet necessary question in one's mind, all the virtues and the sins of man become equally insufferable and petty folly."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:44 am

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"One would not ask of a dog that it should become more of a dog, nor would one rebuke a dog for being any less of a dog than it should be. All animals live in accord with their fundamental nature, while man rarely rises up to the stature of his own humanity, and the far extremity of his own destiny remains unknown to him. Man alone fails to be what he is. Yet, he still cannot stoop below himself. He cannot even abandon himself and feed on wild grass with the oxen. "I could not become a beast, let alone an insect," cries Dostoyevskian man, and it is a quite genuine lamentation. Bereft of Gods and Men, the individual is consigned to eternal isolation; unable to find any real object outside of himself upon which to direct his most vital power, he would find no contentment even provided all the breadth of the creation, nor is he able to "read in the tongues of heaven the meaning of the earth," to speak with Holderlin. The real moral question is precisely this, the question of the relation between the living ego and the ideal ego, between individual man and universal humanity;
The primal commandment of philosophy, Know Thyself, assumes as its foundation the primal commandment of true morality, Be Thyself, and neither taken alone or taken individually does either precept allow us to gain any deeper understanding of ourselves. Alas, there is so much virtue in man! But so little insight. So much knowledge! But so little sanctity.

This question is given varied forms in all great philosophies. In Plato it is depicted in the relation between man’s finite bodily existence and eternal soul. With the concept of the daemonic this question, to my mind, finds at last its perfect expression and, ultimately, its resolution."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:44 am

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"The basic idea here is that man approaches so closely the divine, that the two become indistinguishable; the polynomous nothingness of the human reflects, abyssally, that of God himself.

We see that this unabsorbable excess does not lie in the ontic dimension, as a question of being, but rather lies immanently within the thinking subject itself, constitutive of its very subjectivity. Schelling names this excess "Will," in opposition to ousia or entity, being, nature."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:45 am

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"The artist is poisoned and sometimes even destroyed by that ideal which he does not bring to fruition, expression, and realization, as long as he possesses the capacity to do so: dulce tibi doluisse; breves Sol ipsa labores interdum patitur, Lunae per furta malignae. [Joannis Baptistae Santolli Operum: The sweetness of melancholy is like unto the sun, which must at times concede its sweetness be thieved upon by the night.] His very life becomes the dream and image in which all the mysteries of his depths, his longings, and his talents depict themselves and give voice to themselves and to his ideal, albeit in subtle phantasmagoria and confused, chimaeric forms, which can only confound his native genius."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:46 am

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"As it is for the cicada which emerges after its life-long slumber for one day but to sing, and then to perish, so it is for man; the intuition of death enkindles some obscure passion and intoxication, and accompanies him in his greatest happiness and triumphs. As Propertius would have it:

"That death could weary love I fear more than death;
that love's failing embers fade upon the pyre
I dread more than the railing fires
entered into my torpid frame, nor in languished death
do I dread pain, but only that the faint sting
of mortal ill could thwart the courses of love's train.
As bone survives the body burned,
love's memory survives the passion spurned
in tempered thought, by haughty passion gone remiss;
alas, the thought of love stronger than love is.
Revealed in the mirror of the flesh, flesh is returned;
love does not engender, love completes;
love does not create, love cultivates,
reaping in the germ of created things
the foretaste of another world,
and beyond the shore of death love rolls on.
For love aims to drink deep of the eternal,
and finds in mortal pleasures only a bitter draught:
alas, the longest love is not long enough,
and briefer is the longer sought."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:46 am

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"Not to be always on the ascent in spirit, but to be capable of remaining at some proud height of virtue and wisdom without tiring and falling back to earth- this distinguishes the noble intellect. For this it is necessary to nurse at least a few petty vanities and follies about oneself. The truly great minds possess always some levity in addition to their loftiness and vigor, and it is only the reveling little humming bird that has wings to fly, but also moreover to stay in place."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:46 am

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"Being unable to purify knowledge of the senses, we have demeaned it and made of knowledge a mere means to the purification of the senses themselves, a means to the "spirit.""

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:47 am

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"One is moral only beneath or above one's self, in temptation or prostration."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:47 am

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"Impersonality, or the virtue of the philosopher.-- One may indeed speak the truth, yet with the accompanying smile one nevertheless tells a lie. [Horace: Who could ever speak the truth while laughing?] Only a philosopher could accomplish the thaumaturgy of laughing with the truth. For only a philosopher is capable of making jest at the truth, that is to say, is capable of being objective, of being impersonal with the truth."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:47 am

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"The poet’s wisdom.-- When the unfulfilled and inarticulate desires of the furtive heart, carried along by the sigh of mere foretaste and shepherded under the wing of esperance, acquire the sound of beautiful music, the promise of satisfaction, enunciation, and the clarity of grief in those beholden to them, there we have poetry. The "great" poet is therefore praised because he transforms his audience into seers and poets while he himself, insofar as he is considered not as a poet but as a living being, is the most unpoetic creature of all, for the strength and clarity of his verse are commensurate with the diffidence and the confusion of his passions. Of course the greater poet can also convince himself of satisfaction and happiness (perhaps it is just this which ultimately characterizes the poet as great) just as the sullen Petrarch had done under moonlight while reading his poems to the mountains, for such can be the eloquence of his irreverent longing and desire, which is capable of intermingling upon the spindle of his ideal the most contrary threads of passion. As Seneca said: si sapis, alterum alteri misce: nec speraveris sine desperatione nec desperaveris sine spe. [It is wise to intermingle the two elements of despair and hope.] Who would doubt there is great wisdom in deceiving one’s self in this way? Who would doubt there is great wisdom in poetry?"

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:48 am

Quote :
"When Socrates named virtue happiness what he really did was what all philosophers before him had done, he named his happiness virtue."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:48 am

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"Joy often inspires us with the thought of virtue, and awakens within us the impulse to claim some duty for ourselves, but without the goad of suffering this newly enkindled passion fails to mature, and quickly perishes. It is said that despair is the mother of hope, but joy rather is so. It is despair that merely cultivates this hope and directs it upon some definite object. Thus a joyous, if sullen nature, such as belonged to Coleridge, can never bring anything to completion, and always must feel itself to be a mere wanderer over the earth. This condition is known as melancholy."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:48 am

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"The noblest egoism belongs to the philosopher, to the contemplative man who, rejoicing over the image of the world, cherishing the recollection of his loves, and enrapt with the admiration for the just and the beautiful, must one day discover that all of this vitality and this richness is not the possession of the life he has praised so well, nor of his beloved, nor of virtue; that in all of these objects of his love he has, in the end, loved only himself, only that image of himself which he cast upon them, for in and of themselves they are only nothing. Thus he bears within himself his self-consciousness as only a plaintive lament, which could well be translated: "Alas, life and world, why are you so impoverished? A pity it is that such a frail and trembling creature as me should need to exist in order to color you with beauty. A pity it is that all this beauty is not your own, a pity it is that all this beauty is mine." The man who has not experienced this lofty sadness has no business in the practice of philosophy."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:49 am

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"The impulse of daemonism.-- Our conscience and our will to knowledge spur us along by different paces, and this awkward and unseemly gait we have acquired- we name it art, that delight in deception and in appearance, in being ourselves deceived, no less by our own selves. The mere fact that man wishes to rise up against destiny, to speak with Homer, to oppugn with his bitterest invectives the objects of his knowledge, to reject what he in his heart actually knows on the behalf of thoughts of a fairer truth- all of this examples this disparity in his nature and, moreover, the fact that the two impulses, the impulse toward meaning, justice, and beauty, and that impulse toward knowledge and truth, have grown up separately, perhaps even raising their stalks out of completely separate domains in the human soul. Between these two impulses there can be found no equation, even given all the effrontery and the sophistry of a Socrates; the work of philosophy must aim to comprehend them in the terms of some higher impulse and, if this impulse is found to not exist, to inspire it."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:49 am

Quote :
"The liberty in knowledge, that mordant eye which looks into the earth as from upon a height, which thereby chooses when and upon what to direct its gaze, and when to turn its gaze away, which is never compelled as by need, danger, envy, or the thought of solace to search into things- this liberty in knowledge is called wisdom."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:49 am

Quote :
"Taking the passions individually.-- Petrarch gives us to understand the five enemies of our peace which inhabit us, which should leave us in perpetual happiness and serenity were they to be banished: avarice, ambition, envy, anger, and pride. Yet, this is only because they, along with all of our passions, captivate us as by a cacophony, and ring out within us only in dissonance and irregularity. All spirited men know that when one such passion rings out within us individually, it always sounds like beautiful music, no matter how malignant it might be. If one gains the assistance of but a little philosophy, the passions learn how to always resolve themselves beautifully into the silence of an idea, and how harmonious and moving the music of our life then becomes, so that we are willing to meet even Petrarch's five terrors as only so many gracious and loving muses!"

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:51 am

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"Nobody has seen the full picture because there isn't one. Nor can we just go about willy nilly painting our own little pictures, inventing worlds and dreaming up fantasies. There is a goal, it is greatness. The Greek word for human being- anthropos.... Know where it comes from? Ano and opos: upward, and "eye." The word human means "The one who looks upward." The goal, insofar as it is greatness and virtue, is only a poetic obscurity- it means only to aspire to more complete humanity."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:52 am

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""Only the philosopher, or the artist or saint or poet possessed nonetheless of a philosopher's spirit, sets before himself the sharpest, hardest limits and so gives himself over into a greater potentiality for growth and development."


This is true because that is the definition of philosophy: " Setting before one's self the hardest limit.""

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:52 am

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"No matter how much pride the philosopher may have discovered in his pursuit of the truth, he must in the end speak in this wise: "Your life that is afforded to you, is what I am, thine arrabon is my aparche; 5 namely, a breath." Under the twilight aspect of form, reason, and supposed truth has the philosopher been strengthened, as the wooded cypress, and grown more resilient in any case than we after a quite vernal nature, who needs must have the warmth and the blessing and, to speak honestly, the delight and all the rich pleasure of the passions, if we are even to live at all. Yet, the great Maya unveiled is still Maya, and the earth seen from under the aspect of eternity is still only earth, and under the eyes of a god is man still only dust. Of little consequence is it, philosophers, to trace back the errors of the flesh into the womb of reason, into the laws of necessity and the uncreated, when from the deep wells of thy own Silenic wisdom one may hear that the flesh itself is error, whose truth can only be engraved in thy breast as the consecration of thy vanity. To look upon with clear and unforgiving eyes the abject madness of the comedy of existence, or to bear with tragic intoxication that one great Silenic error and folly, namely to have lived, with all those other innumerable deceits with which it may have cheated us; are these two modes of life, that of the philosopher and that of the artist, not then equally images of the truth? While the philosophers and artists have equally presumed truth to be a rarity and truthfulness the highest difficulty, perhaps truth is only the most common of things, and silence rather the rarity.

Both modes of life- tragic self-destruction and the objective subordination to the truth, are consummated in the recognition of the world's vanity. Thus, rather silence than the truth, which is to say, we must approach truth not as something to be won but as a barrier to be overcome, a fruitful limit we impose on ourselves for the same reason poets confine themselves to a rigid meter- truth as something more valuable when it goes unsaid as opposed to said, that is, when it is treated as just that fruitful limit."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:53 am

Quote :
"Ahi qual fallo e mirar cio, che mirato
desta il desire, e col desir tormenta!
Le Stelle indarno, indarno accusa il fato
chi del proprio suo mal fabbro diventa:
Stassi al varco del ciglio in dolte aguato
amor dolce nemico, e ment ei tenta
nel cuor l ingresso, con felice inganno
ospite v entra, e vi riman tiranuo.


Oh! What an error to look still upon your image,
even after you have taken leave and given me your farewell,
for when desire is named, desire torments!
Desire, hence, what a fruitless star! Fruitlessly to accuse fate,
and her wrought smithy in the firmament,
and the circuit it hath thereby bore her to tread forever;
together she, with the beloved, in sweet ambush
confound love's vision, and makes of it a sweet enemy,
which, happy to be deceived, the heart entreats and welcomes,
again and again subject to your tyrannizing.


-- Vincenzo da Filicaia, Avvertimento ali Anima."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:53 am

Quote :
"Above all else, man endeavors that he might at last know life, not that he might love it, and thereby abdicating that stolid post for his soul's salvation, bore in futile solitude, he avers himself this garb of flesh in the name of neither pleasure or spite, and lives neither for the sake of happiness nor for the sake of conquering pain, for he recalls that suffering of old Job, which could be assuaged neither with the promise of heaven's riches nor with anger, with neither hope, pity, or with the unseen movements of some inhuman justice, but only with awe. Indeed, it is the awe of life which is man's final comfort, not pleasure, with its vague intuitions of the earth's great bounty, nor even love, in its definite grasp, in its confidence and pious severity, nor does this last comfort lie in the mind, regardless of what the saints and philosophers might tell us- the mind, in all its vast epicycles and supernal brilliance, which is only the glint of that star which, upon the mirrored face of the sea into which it leads us, appears then so meager, and but a weary, dwindling beacon. The stillness of the uncreated, the womb of all that is yet to be and live, or truth eternal in its placidity, unmoved by the avarice of death and nature- that music of the spheres, which choirs with the wisdom of the dead and with the dreams of the forgotten, are perhaps the hopeful banners under which the unborn and the departed might bear their fate, but it is just that the living, who alone have the need of it, are alone provided the most perfect solace, namely awe, or wonder, as the Greeks so named it. Life is a dying flame, that needs must feed itself with the living earth."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:55 am

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"... the philosophical ideas are so many symbols of human incomprehension, exiguity, and fault, and to think, which means to take living consciousness of an idea, represents of itself an atonement and confession. Protracted thought has as its end the kenotic, complete division of the inner life of the individual into respective ideas. The point of departure which genius therefor claims for itself is quite irrelevant: in actuality every passion is the prophet of a more general humanity, and thought will reach its end regardless of its beginning, so long as that beginning is firm. At bottom, both the philosopher and the poet do no more than cry out to the wilderness- though, while the poet deplores the fact that the wilderness provides no answer to him, for the philosopher it is not what the wilderness says that holds any meaning, but rather the wilderness itself. The same vain and bestial cry then, which in the mouth of the poet becomes the accusation of temporality, death, and falsity, becomes in the mouth of the philosopher the very qualification of truth."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 3:58 am

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"The Solitary. He doesn't seek to impose his laws on others, nor does he respect the laws of others. Why try to make slaves out of beasts that cannot perform the tasks you would want performed, that cannot live up to your standard? He doesn't seek out new experiences or dangers either, and cares not for adventure. He doesn't like the herd, so he avoids it. Mostly just because he doesn't like their stink, and also because he simply enjoys being with himself more than he enjoys being with others. Unlike Nietzsche's Zarathustra, he never goes down from his mountain. Why? People come up to him, of their own accord. And he graciously offers to them some of his riches, simply because it amuses him that someone would actually make it to him and be able to scale the mountain by themselves."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:01 am

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"All very true, but by cure I mean that which would allow this daemonic process to be sustained indefinitely. As such, it is doomed. Anyone who comes down this path will go down this path, if you understand me. Without some new means of sustaining the daemonic consciousness, in and of itself it is doomed to annihilate the self, as Nietzsche was annihilated, which is worse than merely physical death. The daemonic individual continually rises and falls within different modes of existence- aesthetic, ethical, romantic, solitary, etc. The heroic-daemonic, philosophically awakened individual is continuously rising through new spheres, enlarging the circle of his consciousness. But I do not know how that heroic ethic can be practiced without exhausting one's self, so that in the end there is always a final daemonic descent, the ultimate descent, into spiritual darkness and insanity. But there must be a way to do it, there must be an answer for if there is not then I would have been unable to formulate the question.

The very thought that a philosophy could be pieced together or extrapolated and evolved from existing knowledge provokes laughter in me.

Philosophy, its noble task, is to provide an image of the world, as a totality, to unite aesthetics, morality, ethics, science, etc. Philosophy moves by leaps, in circles- spirals of circles, not a straight line of evolution to use the words of Goethe. The Selfish Gene does not do that. I, too, have a problem with people misusing words, you see. It isn't a work of philosophy, the Selfish Gene.
The only thing that has "evolved" as far as the human intellect goes is the psychological impact of philosophical ideas, and the way in which man integrates, psychologically, those ideas. The ideas themselves as I have said are generated as insoluble unities.
There is my basic premise once again, friend. The ideas of philosophy do not evolve, or change. They are immutable. I am a new Platonism. I have said it many ways, and argued it by many means, and I will continue to defend philosophy from those who would want to reduce its nobility and scope, that would aim to make it just another scholastic jigsaw puzzle.

Stop turning evolution into some metaphysical concept. What evolutionary pressure for ideas? There is no such thing. They do not influence human survival one way or another. Wars are not fought over ideas, they're fought over material things.

It is not evolutionary pressure, but the structure of human consciousness, that generates ideas, and that peculiar structure (which I have written a nearly 800 page book explaining, and spoken of as the daemonic) leads to a peculiar formation of ideas. To have a subjective existence, to possess a subjective consciousness like we do, an animal requires that particular structure. It is teleological: the only telos in all of nature. You either have that daemonic structure or you don't- if you do, you get what we humans get, a philosophizing, subjective, erotic mind. If you don't, what do you get? Just a really smart animal. That telos is the bridge that must be crossed to acquire the kind of consciousness we humans have. Any alien being that exists in space which is intellectually realized will be exactly like us in terms of its psychology.

To get to reason you have to go through the structure of consciousness and self which operates in us human beings. I, in my books, have shown how reason and philosophy depend on a particular kind of self-consciousness to be formed, a particular structure we call subjectivity.

It is not my aim to contradict it. But it ends where man begins, that is all. An end is no contradiction. To me the human intellect is the product of a structure of self-consciousness. While that structure may have been evolved, it must remain the same on any planet, any time, anywhere in order for what we call reason and intellect to emerge. When it arises, everything else is teleological. Our psychology, politics, all the philosophical ideas, etc, have all developed teologically, immutably, and by necessity, in accordance with that structure, and cannot be changed. Our human fates have been determined already. The human story, too, has already been told, in its entirety, from first to last. It's over. We must only retell it, in our own ways, comprehending in the image of universal life our particular lives. The excess, the fullness of human life, can be re-told forever. We can only, perhaps, become more aware of it, see it more clearly, as the languages we use become more and more precise. Man, it can be said, has not yet even begun to live, in that sense. I believe in true creation, in speech uninfluenced by our place in history, but I must also therefor believe in true fate, and a creation whose subject must remain the same- this human story.

Besides, you are missing the point. The human intellect does not evolve any longer. If any change occurred in the brain that altered the structure of self-consciousness I have been speaking of, we would lose our capacity to reason. The intellect is locked in its final condition. Evolution is over for it, it is done. Do you understand that? It cannot be evolved any further without being destroyed. And its development is now oriented teleologically, for reasons already mentioned. That's the point. Evolution is a process- only a process. And in man that process can go no further, it has ended. Even if you made an AI, it would need this human structure of self-consciousness to be able to reason, and only one form of intellect would be available to it, so it wouldn't be able to think any better than a human, merely faster.

Either/Or, The Gay Science, Spinoza's Ethics, Plato's Republic, Schiller's Letters, Unamuno's The Tragic Sense of Life. Those are works of philosophy. In those works stand united all the many regions of the human intellect, from art to morality. Those works are mirrors of human existence, as a totality. The Selfish Gene is a mediocre scholastic work. It does not accomplish the same.
Besides, until the universe itself has been proven to be the result of an evolutionary process of some kind, with other "competing" universes, I would just go ahead and keep evolution as a principle restricted to the biological sciences. It doesn't really help explain anything else, as I have noted- especially with regard to the human intellect
."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


Last edited by Lyssa on Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:05 am; edited 3 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:01 am

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"The task as Goethe said- of philosophy, is to rethink the same ideas, in the old Platonic sense, wedding them with our individual lives and fathoming within their image, as by a mirror, the sum of human existence, expanding it from particular to universal scope."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:02 am

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"The natural range of man's affinities is very impoverished and rarely does beauty or virtue glint over his sorrowful brow. However, the few moments of aesthetic pleasure that happen to ray in upon his life he is able to extrapolate into an entire theory of the beautiful and the few moments of inspired feeling, bravery, and virtuousness which he has known he is capable of generalizing in the canon of some morality, for his eye is very well fashioned for finding out the similarity between things and the various states of the soul, and for extracting from such similarity the essence behind these things, the "knowledge." Yet, it is just this eye that makes it difficult for him to find the beautiful or the virtuous in his life and the world of living things, as opposed to his theory and morality, for greatness in all of its forms, be they the forms of the good or the beautiful, is always distinct, different, a rarity. The philosopher, on the other hand, possesses an eye attuned to the differences between things and finds in everything to which he sets this eye only so many points of distinction so that, instead of reading his knowledge into man and world, he relinquishes it as it were to the marvelous play of appearances in which they consist, which is to say he gives his spirit free reign to take each phantom for what it is and to therefor fully engage and question it. The eye of the philosopher is very much opposed to extracting that popular kind of knowledge from the images upon which it is exercised, for it cannot easily find out the point of commonality between things, and what knowledge the philosopher does have, if it can be a kind of knowledge, is by no means knowledge of the essence. Contrary to the opinion of many, it is the essence which is knowable and the appearance that is enigmatic and hard to find out, that is- the rarity, the different, and the distinct, that defy man's cunning, in which the "knowledge" of the philosopher consists, in which the philosopher finds a reversed kind of essentiality."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:02 am

Quote :
"All very true, but by cure I mean that which would allow this daemonic process to be sustained indefinitely. As such, it is doomed. Anyone who comes down this path will go down this path, if you understand me. Without some new means of sustaining the daemonic consciousness, in and of itself it is doomed to annihilate the self, as Nietzsche was annihilated, which is worse than merely physical death. The daemonic individual continually rises and falls within different modes of existence- aesthetic, ethical, romantic, solitary, etc. The heroic-daemonic, philosophically awakened individual is continuously rising through new spheres, enlarging the circle of his consciousness. But I do not know how that heroic ethic can be practiced without exhausting one's self, so that in the end there is always a final daemonic descent, the ultimate descent, into spiritual darkness and insanity. But there must be a way to do it, there must be an answer for if there is not then I would have been unable to formulate the question."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:04 am

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"A question can be a consolation just as much as an answer can."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Wed Sep 03, 2014 4:05 am

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"I admire nothing as much as I admire that old Socratic nobility, which treats the supreme truths and objects of knowledge with myth and poetry, that so acutely intellectual taste which reserves its very gaiety, excess, and liberality for precisely the gravest matters: in life just as much as in philosophy I strive for such nobility and reservation. Let this be known: we can atone for the sin of death by living well, but there can be no atonement in even death for the sin of having lived poorly. The great human being possesses in its depths a recondite logic by which it unites all the petty, shameful, or sublime things about itself. Where, in the common soul, all experiences or passions that are alien to the habitual character of one's life are either forgotten or cast away as inimical, the great nature is continually enlarged by this recondite logic- by its philosophy, and as though it were building a shell about itself, it contains more and more diverse feelings and amasses the rich store of its experience until it becomes inviolable, until its actions and very feelings are induced only by the tensions and laws within itself."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Parodites' Daemon Thu Nov 27, 2014 1:11 am

Lyssa wrote:
Quote :
"All very true, but by cure I mean that which would allow this daemonic process to be sustained indefinitely. As such, it is doomed. Anyone who comes down this path will go down this path, if you understand me. Without some new means of sustaining the daemonic consciousness, in and of itself it is doomed to annihilate the self, as Nietzsche was annihilated, which is worse than merely physical death. The daemonic individual continually rises and falls within different modes of existence- aesthetic, ethical, romantic, solitary, etc. The heroic-daemonic, philosophically awakened individual is continuously rising through new spheres, enlarging the circle of his consciousness. But I do not know how that heroic ethic can be practiced without exhausting one's self, so that in the end there is always a final daemonic descent, the ultimate descent, into spiritual darkness and insanity. But there must be a way to do it, there must be an answer for if there is not then I would have been unable to formulate the question."

Why is it "worse"?
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