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Black Panther

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue May 31, 2016 3:01 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Quote :
If the "first step" is to take the bull by the horns, its a call for a Theseus, a Wagner, a barbaric-romantic hero.

If it is to ride and direct the bull away into dharma, its a call for a Dionysos, an Achilles, a plutonic-excess hero, where the arena itself has to be widened, the context made pro-found with higher aims, the bull becomes small...
The pic. is marked under Saggitarius, the Archer-Direc-Taur of Jupiterian Excess

What follows is the sensual becomes elevated over the sexual, the beautiful stage of the Greeks.   Hebe is replaced by Ganymede, a male center of gravity.

Its well phrased, to take the sexual by the horns;
to create a hero out of the sexual -
the character is first purely sexual but in an ordeal turns more refined, and stronger, and a new violence emerges as character;

such a hero can not live without a heart that is named in such terms as Dionysos or Poseidon Earthshaker - or Zeus Cloudgatherer - gods that tear open and enlarge the world, lightning and stormgods, and chtonic monsters of the soul that devour morality, all these are welcome in the life of the hero. The antiFaust; one simply weighs ones soul in gold and take the deal; to become what one is, is to sell ones soul to life itself. This is what the Greeks did, their profound superficiality, their uncompromising being by virtue of it not even being deep enough to compromise; one either is, or isn't; and this is how it should be, or how happiness is made. This is what Heraclitus means with fire, why fire is character and fate, and why it devours that waters of Thales to return being to the cauldron of timeless oblivion after all the goods are spent. The planetary system is the ecstatically whirling circumference of orgiastic wastefulness that is the foundation of all temporal being, that is to say of all becoming; against the backdrop of infinite possibility, spendthrift is the only path to substance, and substance is like the crown of a Geisir.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue May 31, 2016 10:03 pm

By the way, L - I very much appreciate your move to correlate Judaism with paganism in the beloved sense; my historical breadth isnt as great as yours so I can only enjoy the fact of it - a nice surprise.

Ill try to not drag it down in gross modernisms.

-

Short - if Satan is The Accuser, he is the Questioner of Values.
Satan is a Philosopher - the only one in the Bible, and the enemy to God, as has become explicit in the Sunni faith;

Satan is philosophy.
Not to say that philosophy is Satan. We know better; Dionysos is wholly unbeknownst to these heathens.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jun 01, 2016 6:55 am

Black Panther wrote:
All things are born from war - Heraclitus.

I affirm Israel not because of their own notion of their right, but because, without any theory involved, I like their fire. I like that certain Jews have taken up the sword. I loathe pacifism. Id always stand with Israel against the Arabs, of course, I stand by my ancestry, I love the intellect (which the Arabs loathe) and I love war, and I loathe Islam, and the people advocating it...
And yet I do not make the claim that this is Justified in some other terms than my own;

In as far as Zionists are working to enforce shit down our throats, they are my enemies; in as far as the wreck the middle east to restore their temple, they are admirable warriors. Not because their temple represents absolute truth or anything close to that, but because its an Earthly goal in a region smothered with Hinterweltlingen.

what the goal is, to my mind, is for all of us to explicate our actual, living, inborn values to each other an ourselves, and based on this form alliances and strategies. No one will ever convince anyone else to change their values -

rather, we can look deeply into values to see what they're worth, what they'd amount to if followed through;


That's exactly what I'm talking about, when I say stands have to be taken - as in stand-ards have to be taken.

If followed through, - and there has been a whole pattern set by history of following through, where it has been made very plain what values have amounted to, and their worth.

"What has Israel or Islam or whatever amounted to when followed through?" - is asking for The frame of action; 'the' as in what one has objectively ranked as the most efficient paradigm of survey, and valuing there-with, with respect to the kind of world/ideal one wants to bring forth.

What would Israel amount to when followed through? - what is the frame of action to contain such a question?


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Some knots that need disentangling.

A man can be the most depraved criminal by day and exhibit an astonishing talent for art and painting by night. Someone else may excel at documenting papers in the right category and with the efficiency of a supersonic flight, and be an average cook or a bad dancer. Or as discussed before, the admirable power of a virus before a vulnerable humanity or compared to a Napoleon…
The great human being is great, because he comes as a redemptive power to all history; makes whole the scattered and gives it a form, lifts it off its chaos; there is a discernible evolution and one is "objectively" able to speak of the bar being raised. This is because a new aesthetic is born that shows life in a richer, elegant way,, whether the average possesses the instruments to grasp it or not. If the blind are unable to see, doesn't mean the sun doesnt exist.

Note that the Apollonian has a positive and a negative pole.

In the positive pole, the great human being is as above - an Orderer, a grand Simplifier who like an aphoristic swordmaster wants to pack the wisdom of attained humanity in three sharp, clear strokes, a bolt of lightning into a sun, a bay of clarity past all the hedges of chaotic forms and disinformation. He cuts right through to the Heart of things, and wins the sun for all.

In the negative pole, he is the neo-Plotinian who sees becoming and flux as an evil, the hybrid reality of variegations existing side by side, excellence and mediocrity juxtaposed so close together, this dissonant scatteredness as an evil, reality as a dis/ease that needs "healing" and attempts to "make whole" again, that which is "fallen" - because the presumption that true reality is an abs. whole, has been taken as an a priori - as in the semitic Tree of Life.
Its why N. quotes Byron saying, the tree of life is not the tree of knowledge.

Hairline differences in motive, spell and spill into a pathos of distance, of gulfs.

The plutonic aesthetic of living beyond pleasure/pain is a standard for those passionate to confront greater and greater reality, as it is - the good and the bad.

What it is not, is a resignation to reality.
That was the Schopehauerian romanticism.

Meaning, reality IS hybrid like the minotaur.
Resigning to the fact that reality is a hybrid, cannot be an objection to life.
It Is flux.
It is the becoming of various phases of various entities juxtaposed together in various degrees of interaction.

When Theseus slays it, it shows its true form in re-turning again as Dionysos, the higher reality principle.
The overcoming of smaller realities opens way to insights into higher realities.

That one can see the good and bad in everything, does not amount to saying Affirmation should be a preservation. This is a resigned romanticism.

slay :
"instrument on a weaver's loom to beat up the weft," Old English slæ, slea, slahae, from root meaning "strike" (see slay (v.)), so called from "striking" the web together. Hence the surname Slaymaker "maker of slays."


The 'slayer' as one who 'strikes the web together' in architecting or con/templating a fabric clashes with, amidst, and over many hybrid realities. When he manages to hold it together, a fabric or a fable - the Apollonian illusion of an Olympia is the outcome, a bedrock upon which the turmoil of a terrible culture raises a tremendous civilization.

Higher realities are outcomes of intense, pro/creative clashes.
Diversity is not preserved to promote agon. It has to be the outcome of an agonistic selection.
Agon must exist primordially to bequeath a richer diversity, a hotbed of meaningful forms as a result of selection, not as a prior principle.

In this sense, the hybrid minotaur has to be slain, not preserved.
The dissonance has to be borne out into an intenser form - we call 'halcyon'.

The genius as the expression of the daemonic/maximum differential power to hold as many contradictions in one's breast, is a genius, because of his ability to organize and the manner in which he organizes them [aesthetics], and *because* he organizes them.
There is a Resolution, a resolve behind it, that lifts all the chaos up into a star - a direct-ion, a peak perspective.

Perspectivism helps "Us" see that reality is a hybrid, each with its own centre of self-assertion.
It is "Not" a god's eye that automatically sanctions and sanctifies the holiness of all perspectives.
It is an acid-test, not a law or a rule, that spurs man on, to "come-to-attain" that spirit, that height of will, whereby, "He" manages to interpret, and import "a" necessity, "an" inter-connectedness to the hybrid turmoil and make of it an ecology. He gives it His liveliness.
The shape this takes shows the quality of his will-to-power, for there is a fine balance between standing dominant over things, and how much one needs to abstract and impose relations, needing to see meanings everywhere, to feel secure about himself.

A cow grazing, flowers blooming, rivers flowing, everything engaging in its own 'innocence', is a Perspectival-Lever to get man to do what He Must, and Not simply to Resign to such a reality.


Back to the topic of Israel, Islam, etc.

Even the most intellectual jewish thinkers were in no doubt that what you look down upon - the monotheistic zeal of the Zionists, is a Logical conclusion of the inverted tree playing out its consequences.

You say, if it weren't for their moralizing ethics, they would be admired as courageous fighters.
But that's side-stepping what reality was - they wouldn't have been able to fight at all, if they hadn't renamed what was good as evil, and what was bad as good.
Deploying this as a temporary strategy of survival is one thing, but believing in this deceit, and and marketing and imposing this deceit as truth is what has emboldened a Zionism into presence.

This re-naming is an artificial canopy, a false shelter, within which, the fighting spirit manages to manifest and flourish.
What is their true mettle once this is lifted?

And let alone that, to what end does this fighting of the Israelis lead to, if not a world in its own image on all? Cutting the frame-of-action before this, is mis-leading.

Its foolish to think that Israel is going to be sitting there, once its dispute for existence has been secured against Palestine, and is simply going to mind its own business!!

The lust for power and self-expansion is an innate reality in all things; Zionism and the imposition of a total world state either politically through embargoes/sanctions/treaties, etc., or memetically through esposuing secular humanism, where the ideal man has been apriori stamped by its will, will now be stamped upon the world…

The idea of a value-system that looks down on absolutism while simultaneously advocating for a diversity that includes an entity bent on erasing diversity is so self-defeating.
Like an escapist procrastinating in useless diversions that will amount to the opp. of what he claims he wants.
How is this not plain to see?

Tell me, if Zionism were to end today, and Israel recognized as a lawful state over such and such geography, then what?
Is the messianic ideology going to change, when one will be forced to justify the memory of so many dead?
Even if there is an Israeli leader, who dares to give up on this monotheistic madness, would the people let him forget? Will he not be the first one to be butchered by his own kind?

To expect that the world will carry on in anentropic harmony, all self-maintaining with each other, forming productive alliances is unrealistic, simply because, wherever there is a power-vacuum, someone is always going to jump in to exploit it to their maximum.
There are so many just like you, who admire the fighting spirit for its own sake, and this means, winning at any cost - even if it means inverting reality, re-naming reality, secluding and excluding reality…  plenty of ways to win...

It is not I or you or anybody, but ideally nature itself throws up, comes alive in forms that take it higher. Growth is a throbbing impulse that fans the flame to achieve more rigor. Plutonic disgusts operate epigenetically whenever one is asked to feel consoled or take comfort in success won any which way, in mere survival. When easy admirations are not given refuge, character-standards are born, a style is born.

Long story short, the difference you introduce between what you admire and what you resist about Israel, is an artificial difference producing a false hybrid. Such false fragmentations is what characterizes the proliferation of modern cancer.
Freud himself saw this continuity between the wisdom of the kabbala and Zionism.

Islam pitted against the Israelis is another false difference and an internal problem, as it is a product and splintering of the same messianic instinct.

Here's recalling a very interesting quote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"The Christian church is an encyclopaedia of prehistoric cults and conceptions of the most diverse origin, and that is why it is so capable of proselytizing: it always could, and it can still go wherever it pleases and it always found, and always finds something similar to itself to which it can adapt itself and gradually impose upon it a Christian meaning. . . . One may admire this power of causing the most various elements to coalesce, but one must not forget the contemptible quality that adheres to this power: the astonishing crudeness and self-satisfiedness of the church's intellect during the time it was in process of formation, which permitted it to accept any food and to digest opposites like pebbles." [Daybreak]


In other words, cleverly joining to itself a multitude of branches, a composite, Xt. managed to triumph "passing off" for a real organic hybrid. This way, it could present itself in a manner whereby one is unable to say No to it in a pure black and white way. Posing with some parts as useful, while some parts continuing to be desireless, it managed to present itself as necessary evil. It forced one to admire the charity, the philanthropy, the schools, the hospitals and all that spirit of charity and kindness as the expression of its existence,,, while simultaneously taming, emasculating, destroying all voluptuous vitality at the other end.  Xt. conservatives are the worst scum of the lot, they lead in the name of "prosperity", of "big-heart", etc. etc.

Modernity is a conglomeration of such artificial hybrids posing as the hybrids of reality.

It comes to a position where, if you deny the artificial hybrid,, you will be shamed as a "reality-hater". This is the Girardian "scandal", where the devil makes you a reactionary to the extent you behave and become just like them, rendered and reduced into their mirror double.

It has inserted itself as a European problem, when it really is not.
Semitic factions that have splintered from the same nihilistic root now pose as false hybrids, turning modern people into schizophrenics - living one life, thinking another. Splintered standards and loyalties, splintered characters, splintered fates. It has rendered them passive, vascillating, and indecisive, as one is not able to say yes or no in one breath.
Good and bad comingle that one cannot make up their minds anymore,, they let go of the rei(g)ns, and push it aside to mull over for another day. It is never resolved.

If we see that the classical minataur is the hybrid product of a breach in promise, left to widen,
modernity - the semitic aftermath, is the hyrbid of a breach in perception, left to widen. The renaming of becoming as false reality, and being as true reality has fabricated itself into reality as the one true reality.

This has to be 'slain'.

Apollonian aesthetic: The more it turns the world into zombies, it is going to have nothing to eat, and will have to eat itself up and die. The few who resist will build a world upon this mammoth ruins.

Dionysian aesthetic: To eat your way into and out of it like an acid, overcoming via affirmation, widen the arena and becoming a monster to the monster, or a monster-tamer. That is, to ride out the problem and exhaust it into a higher perspective, a higher direct-ion.

Or, or…    is why we do philosophy.
Other approaches to hybrids.
Other routes and rules of engagement for an even higher aesthetics.

The Germanic tree of life and the Hebraic tree of life are so different. Odin's cunning and sorcery is not meant to cheat life; there Is a Ragnarok.

These differences are not pertinent at the moment.

I am just pointing out the Practical impossibility of simultaneously advocating against absolutism And advocating for a pluralism that involves an identitarian entity bent on affirming its absolutism.

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jun 01, 2016 7:03 am

Black Panther wrote:
By the way, L - I very much appreciate your move to correlate Judaism with paganism in the beloved sense

In a thread on Satanic freedom, wouldn't the appropriate part be playing at the least the Devil's advocate, if not the devil herself?

Quote :
Short - if Satan is The Accuser, he is the Questioner of Values.

"To strive for the forbidden."

Transgression is a crime, knowledge is a dis-crimination.

Quote :
Satan is philosophy.
Not to say that philosophy is Satan. We know better; Dionysos is wholly unbeknownst to these heathens.

Satan is the philo-, the desire, the passion for the real true, ideally.

And Sophia?
So vile and veiled…

N. thought she was Baubo.
I think she must be something like the astrological Lilith… a troll full of schadenfroh...

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jun 01, 2016 7:15 am

perpetualburn wrote:
Quote :
If the "first step" is to take the bull by the horns, its a call for a Theseus, a Wagner, a barbaric-romantic hero.

If it is to ride and direct the bull away into dharma, its a call for a Dionysos, an Achilles, a plutonic-excess hero, where the arena itself has to be widened, the context made pro-found with higher aims, the bull becomes small...
The pic. is marked under Saggitarius, the Archer-Direc-Taur of Jupiterian Excess

What follows is the sensual becomes elevated over the sexual, the beautiful stage of the Greeks.   Hebe is replaced by Ganymede, a male center of gravity.

Wagner, who charmed all and inflamed in them a "heavy" passion…

And thanks for the new pointer.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jun 01, 2016 7:36 am

Black Panther wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
Regarding your comment on "its better to be a powerful and healthy female than a feeble male, at any time" is stuck on pure social power.

That statement needs more qualifying - what is real power, where is male feeble - who stops him from keeping him healthy?, what does he stand to lose in the small and big picture, is power even the right slicer or does man feel stong elsewhere and is that any good? etc. etc.

Address the rest later.

I consider a man weak if he walks the treadmill and makes a life out of that.  This is pure surrender, weakness, absence of individual power, no self-valuing integrity that works consciously, he is by all means a slave, and a component of a greater machine, not himself a real being.

To being such a man, I would prefer being a woman who does not walk the treadmill; that is to say, I prefer to exist, than to not exist.

I consider most humans to only partially exist.
In as far as one lets oneself be commanded how to act and prescribed what to value, one is not an entity. Most humans wouldnt know what it is to be an entity; one must be of strong birth to renounce the prescriptions.

A man can still walk the treadmill and forsake its truth in his own time, then he is struggling as a form of strength. And yet he does not escape the sickness.

Only when a man sets his own terms and is able to live by them, is he strong, free, virtuous, worthy of being. Such self-set terms are more often than not cultural choices; for example, the Roman man of culture, to whom being banished would be a fate worse than death. The only solution for such a man would be to conquer the city, merely for the right to inhabit it.

People see just the social power, and forget how modern women are in fact the most owned by the institution.
Protection is not guarantee of authentic freedom or individuality.

And what terms can man not set because of modern women, and is that the only way to authentic living?
Aporias everywhere, calls for more refined sophistications or a grand simplicity.

I do not equate cultural sublimation with civilizational repression.

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Thu Jun 02, 2016 2:27 am

Black Panther wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Quote :
If the "first step" is to take the bull by the horns, its a call for a Theseus, a Wagner, a barbaric-romantic hero.

If it is to ride and direct the bull away into dharma, its a call for a Dionysos, an Achilles, a plutonic-excess hero, where the arena itself has to be widened, the context made pro-found with higher aims, the bull becomes small...
The pic. is marked under Saggitarius, the Archer-Direc-Taur of Jupiterian Excess

What follows is the sensual becomes elevated over the sexual, the beautiful stage of the Greeks.   Hebe is replaced by Ganymede, a male center of gravity.

Its well phrased, to take the sexual by the horns;
to create a hero out of the sexual -
the character is first purely sexual but in an ordeal turns more refined, and stronger, and a new violence emerges as character;

such a hero can not live without a heart that is named in such terms as Dionysos or Poseidon Earthshaker - or Zeus Cloudgatherer - gods that tear open and enlarge the world, lightning and stormgods, and chtonic monsters of the soul that devour morality, all these are welcome in the life of the hero. The antiFaust; one simply weighs ones soul in gold and take the deal; to become what one is, is to sell ones soul to life itself. This is what the Greeks did, their profound superficiality, their uncompromising being by virtue of it not even being deep enough to compromise; one either is, or isn't; and this is how it should be, or how happiness is made. This is what Heraclitus means with fire, why fire is character and fate, and why it devours that waters of Thales to return being to the cauldron of timeless oblivion after all the goods are spent. The planetary system is the ecstatically whirling circumference of orgiastic wastefulness that is the foundation of all temporal being, that is to say of all becoming; against the backdrop of infinite possibility, spendthrift is the only path to substance, and substance is like the crown of a Geisir.


The wedding of Zarathustra to Eternity.

The fear of Death still reigns.
The clinging and attachment to forms.

When ancestors die, you meet and greet them again in your children, in another configuration.
The death of that unique, particular form is mourned, but the wise also see the self-love, in welcoming Its lust to live out all possibilities, in this combination at this time and place, and that combination at some other time and place.
The 'self' explores its own efficiency.

This does not mean death is trivial, or there is no loss.
The Apollonian affirmation of form - being, must persist enough against chaos, to cultivate a personna and character that lives on, that endures.
At the same time, the Dionysian lust for life must be real-ized in becoming - as the fury of the genius to re-assert itself wearing another hood…
The astral natality of the house, environment one is born, the parents one has, friends, partners, children, scope, luck, and other matters that can be pulled within one's orbit is a con-sequence of mindful, ex-orbit-ant living pressed from and explored over generations.
Exorbitant interests is a common term for [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]; but in the voluptuous venetian sense, the excess for life, the palace of wisdom.

Ideologically, yes, many parts of our ecosystem are dying.
Endangered species are dwindling, and may even go extinct.
The same goes for certain tribes of people, and forms that may be lost.

It is to be mourned, and an effort for preservation is needed, in as much such endangered forms are the consequence of the stupidity of some retards on the planet.

It is not to be mourned in as much assisted preservation and farcical guarantee of "right to exist" will only provide an artificial climate for retards to thrive.

All forms must face, and will face eventually the test of natural selection, "universal human rights" existing or not existing.
Artificial guaranteed diversities, that are products of a fear of Death, are fragmenting cancers, multiplying like moss all over the globe.

This too shall pass.

Some Old forms shall Re-new, in life's thirst for the ring of life.
Excess (jup.) of the Nuptial (ven.) Virgin (merc.).

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Thu Jun 02, 2016 1:04 pm

There is no relation between the Tree of Life and Yggdrasil; there is none, except that they are opposites, in the way that you point out; the very essence of Yggdrasil and the Runes is the non-absolute nature of things. This is what I mean when I say substance is like the crown of a Geysir, too - it is only in the Chokmah aspect of the Tree of Life; the aspect of pure relentless extension, activity, that there is a link to the Odinic; this pure activity is after all not contained in any form, thus it is not absolutized in any specific way, except for 'being force' - which indeed is already an absolutization. I doubt not that Einstein has used the Tree of Life extensively to arrive at his formula, which is a way of unifying pure force (c) with pure form (m) in the form of energy (e), which is the integration of both (relative motion) and relates to the middle pillar.

Anyway. It will not do, it will not satisfy any tastes either, to try to homogenize traditions; and to homogenize the Hebrew with the Odinic is like unifying blue cheese with maple syrup; it negates anything of value in both.

My philosophy demands a cosmology that exists within the Unknown, a runic cosmology that builds itself out of human excess - acts and will, 'folly unto wisdom'; this is what I mean by 'setting ones own terms' ; to bring oneself out of the ground like a spring, to dig oneself up and release into the world. This is Dionysos and why he is related to Odin - and again Chokmah, the pre-systemic sephira, the sphere used to identify the Berserker nature of being before it becomes tamed into a society.

Do not forge that Israel lies in the desert, and that the desert has need of .... barren laws.... laws that count with barrenness, with limits. Saturnian.

Europe is lush, rich, a paradise. It must live under different laws and gods. The two should not meet, nor should the world be considered "One" so as to demand that only one of these styles of being exists.

Islam is a product of Judaism, a very direct product, and a purely subservient product. Yes, the two are one and the same problem, and it is a problem that should be resolved where it emerged; in the godforsaken desert.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Fri Jun 03, 2016 6:35 am

Its because I had not forgotten Israel is in the desert, I said,

Lyssa wrote:
"Deploying this as a temporary strategy of survival is one thing, but believing in this deceit, and and marketing and imposing this deceit as truth is what has emboldened a Zionism into presence…
There are so many just like you, who admire the fighting spirit for its own sake, and this means, winning at any cost - even if it means inverting reality, re-naming reality, secluding and excluding reality…  plenty of ways to win…"


Today, its Israel, tom. it could be any other entity using any kind of deceit to flourish and triumph, and is one expected to admire this for its own sake?

Is one expected to admire the "fighting spirit" of some low life using the environment of his "abused home" as a justification to normalize weakness into society? If a Narcissist manages to build a whole township full of casinos and theaters and amusement parks, to bask in his self-reflection, should we admire his 'creative genius', even if at bottom, he is a weakling hedonist sick of life? And so on and so forth, plenty of examples one can think of.

If everything is merely to be judged in its own light, then any and every imbecile could be valued as a genius, as a thing of beauty.

If everything is already valuable, then value comes to have no value.

If stand-ards are not taken - i.e., a frame-of-action, then it all becomes non-sensical.


In the narrow frame, appreciating the fighting spirit of Israel that has used a whole falsification of reality - in the larger frame of tomorrow is spelling death for the planet.

Concepts, notions, falsifications, helping things thrive with no reference to reality - the disconnect from the phenomenal world has become so entrenched, there is nothing but simulation left. A dysgenics of pure simulacra. Things like honor and truth - pure simulation… the goddess has departed.

Do you not see?


What I cannot see, in any case, is how, even if there should be some leader advocating the tree of life in new terms, will not be put to death for 'impiety', for attempting to re-write history anew…

Nevermind Freud, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] - the most philosophical jewish thinker Openly said, the "jewish problem" cannot be solved, and instead presented "continual dialogue" with "athens" as "the" "solution".

To him, the three Zionisms were all too intertwined, and cannot be separated. The interconnection was both the problem and the solution at once, they cancel and augment each other;

1. Political Zionism - without which, there would be no 'promised' land to flourish and persist as an entity.

2. Cultural Zionism - the secular jewish-diaspora who have integrated into europe and other parts as their land, and therefore no jews at all in the proper sense of jewish identity stemming from one who believes in the Lord's promise of a promised land.

3. Religious Zionism - which is the rabbinical belief in revelation and chosenness, existing only as wanderers and settling nowhere till the coming of the messiah, refusing all political existence.


These false hybrids juxtaposed together, are artificial differences, empty red-herring complications, and schizoid fragmentations from the deceit of cheating life, inverting reality using mere words.
One lie prolonged, proliferates into more and more lies… parading as truth, strength and success…

That which you admire is at bottom, Their hedonistic fear of pain, of death, of becoming, that has become Transposed on the whole of Europe, and the World as The problem.

An internal problem pulling down everything. Not that Plotinus or the hellenic period is excused in any way.


Should Israel be guaranteed its land in the dispute with Palestine, its foolish to think, they would be doing anything new than continuing to immerse the world in their "truth" that helped them "flourish" "successfully"…

What Could Israel amount to, but that?

What Can Israel amount to?...

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Fri Jun 03, 2016 6:37 am

Broad points.


1.

Affirmation is a degree of one's capacity to cleanly, courageously relate to not just their ancestral past, but the whole organic and inorganic past beyond the human world.



2.

Success and duration is no indicator to the quality of an entity's will-to-power.
N.'s critique of (social) Darwinism stems from this insight, that the triumph of weak-will forms by cunning, is not a true progress. Weakness multiplies to level down life itself.
At bottom, every entity uses whatever immoral means to self-assert into duration, because of which, it is always possible to identify those master-types that do Not want to win at any cost - beyond pleasure/pain, victory/defeat, gain/loss.
They are character-standards who take the path of maximum resistance and differentiate themselves with a style.
Conatal Preservation alone amounts to nothing. Else even a cockroach can be admired for its resilience, having endured and persisted for over a billion years.



3.

There is the cunning of the weak that uses deceit to rob life of its highest attained standards and pull values down, so it can stand up.
And there is the cunning of the strong that uses deceit to make possible life-sustaining illusions, and the freedom to pull one up to life's heights.
And then there is the strong, who do not even need deceit to carve the highest standards.
Nature separates men, will-types, standards.
In the evolutionary frame-of-action, what does a deceit amount to? - whether its life-diminishing or life-enhancing and what kind of life is enhanced, etc. should be the guiding question.


4.

To insist everything be and can only be appreciated in its own light, betrays a hatred for the organizing power that is man, and life itself.

To stand on top and assess, arrange and assign ranks - a hierarchy, is the most natural and freest activity of the consciousness, which at its most powerful, translates to the philosophical instinct of the law-giver.

Life is an efficiency that is an organizational passion.

To insist that it should not be possible to compare, co-relate, and arrive at superior/inferior rank arrangements, and everything be appreciated only in its own light, is an inefficient life-diminishing stand, one that is against Philosophy itself. The nature of Philosophy is to discriminate all things into rank-standards.

To this, one will argue, there is no 'absolute god's eye-view' from which to make such judgements.  I agree.

But that there isn't, doesn't mean that life itself doesn't strive to attain that apotheosis of maximal efficient.

That there is no abs. singular perspective in life, does not mean, one should not want to attain to it. All entities strive to pre-dominate, to stand on top, to be god-like.

To argue that just because there is no 'god's eye-view', all things should only be appreciated within its own monad, is a Resignation to chaotic reality, to the sphinx of many eyes.

This is why a value-system that simultaneously advocates against absolutism, while promoting pluralism that involves An  israel that strives to become abs. god is hypocritical, and non-sense at best.

All entities want to become god.
Its pretentious to advocate nothing should impose on the other, and even more pretentious, while simultaneously advocating the right of something to become its utmost value.
Sure one can say it, but they wouldn't be reflecting real reality - life Is pure exploitation, capitalization, expansion, self-assertive imposition upon another, the striving to be absolute.

No two values Can be compared, and because that is so, a 'philosopher' who maintains that no two values Should be compared, resigns to life, makes resignation itself into a value, and de-selects his own self and self-valuing.

Highest life-forms are fragile owing to their powerful senses and lust for the highest organization.
N.'s task was to ponder how these fragile forms could become more consolidated without losing elasticity.
This requires a self-reverence, an eagle's view, an elevated will - in short the maximal conscious discriminating power to fearlessly set worth and ranks. This is man's highest innocence.



5.

Strength is an excess-relation to Death and mortality.

A child asks its father, what happens should an earth-quake destroy our home?
The father replies, we begin again.

A human who says, "False forms have to be shattered and mercilessly destroyed with no sentimentality." would be called an "evil person", a "hater", etc.

Should a natural cataclysm, a tremor, a cyclone, an avalanche, a tornado wipe out and shatter to ruins a whole land,, wouldn't the one or two surviving begin again? And one or two seize in it a chance to break old tablets, and start at wisdom from Scratch, a renewed tree of life, beyond the loss/gain of old tablets…?

The courage to acknowledge something wrong as wrong, and not justify and falsify it further with this or that excuse.
Not cling to false forms like some egyptian mummification to preserve it after death.
In such sense, N. said, it does not matter where one comes from, but where one goes that shows true origin.

Should one wait for a natural destruction to derive an Impetus to start Fresh, start Anew?
Where is that man who is such a cataclysmic force of nature? The barbarian from above, who destroys to create… a new day anew..

The power of Dagaz…


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:58 am

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Satyr wrote:
"The word cosmos [κοσμος] has its etymological roots in cosmima [κοσμιμα], from where the English get cosmetics - "jewel"."


Quote :
"Cosmos: from Latinized form of Greek kosmos "order, good order, orderly arrangement," a word with several main senses rooted in those notions: The verb kosmein meant generally "to dispose, prepare," but especially "to order and arrange (troops for battle), to set (an army) in array;" also "to establish (a government or regime);" "to deck, adorn, equip, dress" (especially of women). Thus kosmos had an important secondary sense of "ornaments of a woman's dress, decoration", (compare kosmokomes "dressing the hair") as well as "the universe, the world."

Pythagoras is said to have been the first to apply this word to "the universe," perhaps originally meaning "the starry firmament," but later it was extended to the whole physical world, including the earth. For specific reference to "the world of people," the classical phrase was he oikoumene (ge) "the inhabited (earth)."

One can think of the army troop of Satan who was "thrown across" [lit. diabolos] the universe...

To the ancients, the sacred protective firmament - Kosmos [not universe] was a bride, adorned and bejwelled in a Veil of stars, where life became possible in contrast to the other dark spaces bereft of life - Khaos.

The first 'grace', or venetian charm - related to Greek kharisma "favor, divine gift," from kharizesthai "to show favor to," from kharis "grace, beauty, kindness".
Charis was the name of one of the three attendants of Aphrodite related to khairein "to rejoice at," from PIE root *gher- "to desire, like"...

A nuptial song with the charming bride...


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"The first time ever I saw your face
I thought the sun rose in your eyes
And the moon and the stars were the gifts you gave
To the dark and empty skies, my love

The first time ever I kissed your mouth
I felt your heart beat close to mine
Like the trembling heart of a captive bird
That was ther at my command, my love

And the first time ever I lay with you
I felt your heart so close to mine
And I knew our joy would fill the earth
And last 'till the end of time my love
And it would last 'till the end of time

The first time ever I saw your face, your face,
Your face, your face"






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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 07, 2016 1:02 pm

Under the Mantle of Love…

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Quote :
"Pan-dora, gift-giver, signals in one name, three meanings: "she is the giver of all gifts", "she who was given all gifts", "the gift of all the gods". [Hurwit 1995]

The "scales of balance" of the external fire stolen by Prometheus, and ending the "golden age" of abs. "wholeness", is off-set by the internal fire hidden in the piths/pyxis or box of Pandora, starting the labyrinthine generation, of the hybrid mingling of good and bad, or to J.-Xts., good and evil.

The Promethean fire of dis-crimination, of culture is a crime that is dis-Mantled by Pandora's fire of civilization.
[The words es-cape and mantle as hood and cloak are related.]
The spinal column balances between the fire in the head, and the fire in the genitals; Evola spoke of the relation of the genius to the daimonic...

Quote :
"Following the non-Hesiodic tradition of the myth, Pandora is Gaia, Mother Earth, the first woman, and wife to Prometheus, who created her out of water and earth and brought her to life with fire. Here, her container is a horn of plenty which contains all the provisions to feed mankind, and as such connotes fertility. The Pandora of Hesiod's tale, on the other hand, is created by Zeus to avenge the gods and punish Prometheus' theft of fire from them. When Pandora opens her box out of curiosity, all the ills of the worlds are released. When the lid falls shut, only hope remains at the bottom of the box. In this account, Pandora is a femme fatale whose beauty, charms and seductiveness ultimately bring about his downfall; and here, her box represents nothing other than the female body, the threats and allures of her sexuality. In a Freudian reading then, the box as an image of concealment as well as mystery, generates a metaphoric relation to the female genitals, which, unlike the phallus, remain hidden and invisible, conceal a secret dangerous to man. Her box in this sense does not so much contain gifts to mankind, but is Gift to him, hope remaining trapped in the box, and unavailable to mankind.

The Pandora myth therefore tells two stories, or we might say, speaks in two tongues. Pandora brings hope and/or ills; she brings remedy and/or poison to mankind; in short, when she opens her container, she unleashes the pharmakon. Thus, not unlike Plato's doubly translatable term pharmakon (writing as poison, and/or as remedy), which, as Derrida shows, came to be inscribed differently by its translators in the tradition of philosophy (sometimes as poison, other times as remedy), so our fork-tongued Pandora has come to be inscribed differently by her mythographers (sometimes as hope for mankind, other times as his ills)."

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Panofsky's Pandora and her comparisons to Aphrodite and Eve in paintings have been briefly excerpted [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].
To the Gnostics, Pandora was the chaste seal of affirmation, the seal of the kiss, the "unbroken knowledge" of the nuptial-Eve before her 'temptation', and the Hesiodic "fall", became their "original sin" - reality itself with its mingling of good and bad was seen as a sin, an evil;

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Quote :
Hesiod wrote:
"So said the father of men and gods, and laughed aloud. And he bade famous Hephaistos [Vulcan; the god of fire] make haste and mix earth with water and to put in it the voice and strength of human kind, and fashion a sweet, lovely maiden-shape, like to the immortal goddesses in face…

...and Athene to teach her needlework and the weaving of the varied web; and golden Aphrodite [Venus] to shed grace upon her head and cruel longing and cares that weary the limbs.

And he charged Hermes [Mercury] the guide, the Slayer of Argos, to put in her a shameless mind and a deceitful nature.

So he ordered. And they obeyed the lord Zeus the son of Kronos [Saturn]. Forthwith [Hephaistos, Hephaestus / Vulcan] the famous Lame God moulded clay in the likeness of a modest maid, as the son of Kronos purposed.

And the goddess bright-eyed Athene girded and clothed her, and the divine Kharites [Charites, Graces] and queenly Peitho [Persuasion] put necklaces of gold upon her, and the rich-haired Horai [Horae, Seasons] crowned her head with spring flowers. And Pallas Athene bedecked her form with all manners of finery.

Also [Hermes] the Guide, the Slayer of Argos, contrived within her lies and crafty words and a deceitful nature at the will of loud thundering Zeus, and the Herald of the gods put speech in her. And he called this woman Pandora [“All-Gifts”], because all they who dwelt on Olympos gave each a gift, a plague to men who eat bread."[ib.]

"Pandora is an archetype containing the archetypes of all of the gods.

Pandora represents our Divine Mother.

Zeus said, "Do not look inside of the urn.” It is the same command as given in the Garden of Eden,

Quote :
"And the Jehovah Elohim [Prometheus / Zeus] commanded Adam, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat:

“But of the tree of the knowledge [Daath] of good and evil [the urn], thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die." [Genesis, 2]

When you place a seal on the urn, when that urn is first delivered, it is chaste and pure, unbroken. It is knowledge (Da'ath), pure, untouched. But when, in our ignorance and curiosity and foolishness, we enter into that, we look inside of that urn, we defile it because we are foolish. That is how the forces of Prometheus invert, and become Epimetheus / Satan, who is chained to the rock: sex.
This is a great agony. That chain is the karma.
The liver is an organ that purifies our blood. The blood is the vehicle of our karma (our karma is carried in our “blood”; i.e. our genes)."

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Nietzsche, of course, differentiated I.E. crime from Semitic sin in his BOT.



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To the Neoplotinians, Pandora who contained in her the gift of all gods, the archetype of all archetypes, was the binding Demiurge;

Quote :
Spenser wrote:
"For when the soule, the which deriued was
At first, out of that great immortall Spright,
By whom all liue to loue, whilome did pas
Downe from the top of purest heauens hight,
To be embodied here, it then tooke light
And liuely spirits from that fayrest starre,
Which lights the world forth from his firie carre."

What Spenser appears to be saying in this passage is that Venus, the ‘fayrest starre’, is to be seen as an ‘immortall Spright’ from whom ‘soule’ emanates.  She is placed at ‘the top of purest heauens hight’, from whence all who live to love (that is, to aspire towards reintegrating themselves in Venus’ celestial manifold) didst descend.  Her light is thus ‘embodied here’, in the material world by means of her ‘firie carre’ (i.e., the planet Venus) which ‘lights the world’.  In other words, Spenser here presents a more or less complete picture of his Venus, portraying her as a Heavenly demiurge whose function is to mediate between the spiritual realm of the Forms — above the World Soul — and the concrete world of matter.  This, then, seems to be a composite Venus who bears similarities both to Ficino’s Heavenly and Vulgar Venuses.  On the one hand, Spenser’s Venus in Of Beavtie is clearly shown to be a goddess of the Intellect, much like Ficino’s Heavenly Venus.  Yet, on the other hand, she is also the same figure who impresses the Forms upon matter — a function filled by Ficino’s Vulgar Venus.

One of the primary roles played by Spenser’s Venus in the hymn is that of the pattern which shapes the world.  Spenser describes Beauty both as the ‘goodly Paterne’ and the ‘wondrous Paterne’ cast by the ‘great workmaister’ in order to mould and fashion the world.What Spenser appears to be saying in these two stanzas is that Venus is the means through which the Demiurge is able to shape the cosmos; she is the pattern by which his ordering faculty is imprinted upon the prima materia.  Bennett identifies this doctrine, in which Venus is not ‘one of several archetypal Ideas’, but rather ‘the sum of the Ideas’ as one which is exemplified in Pico, but is a general feature of Renaissance Neoplatonism. In this way, we can see Spenser’s Venus as not only being of the Intellect, but as the Intellect; she is, for Spenser, not one of the Forms, but the totality which is both comprised of them and at once supervenes over and contains them.

Anamnesis.

Nearer to our own time, the idea, nourished by the Neoplatonic tradition, that the soul retains the memory of its place of origin but can no longer perceive it, is expressed by Shakespeare through Lorenzo’s love for Jessica:

Shakespeare wrote:
"How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music
Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night
Become the touches of sweet harmony.
Sit Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
Is thick inlayed with patines of bright gold;
There’s not the smallest orb which thou behold’st
But in his motion like an angel sings,
Still quiring to the young-ey’d cherubims;
Such harmony is in immortal souls;
But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
Doth grossly clothe it in, we cannot hear it."

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"To strive for the forbidden" - whether Prometheus or Pandora, the right to wholesome knowledge as in nuptial love, becomes initiatory. Tests set by "Venus" to "Cupid and Psyche" [venus' mirror double], becomes in Xt., a case of sexist differentiation between the active evil of prometheus' theft of the forbidden, who has to be restrained to a rock, and the passive evil of pandora who cannot restrain herself from that which is forbidden;

Quote :
"Harrison comments that Zeus ‘takes over even the creation of the Earth-Mother who was from the beginning’.
This is confirmed by Hesiod’s description of the silvery robe and embroidered veil with which Athena clothed Pandora and the exquisite crown that Hephaestos made for her:

Quote :
"And the goddess bright-eyed Athena girded and clothed her with silvery raiment, and down from her head she spread with her hands a broidered veil, a wonder to see; and she, Pallas Athena put about her head lovely garlands, flowers of new-grown herbs. Also she put upon her head a crown of gold which the very famous Limping God made himself and worked with his own hands as a favour to Zeus his father. On it was much curious work, wonderful to see; for of the many creatures which the land and sea rear up, he put upon it wondrous things, like living beings with voices: and great beauty shone out from it."

The beauty of this creation was none the less to be a deception to humankind Hephaestos, having fashioned Pandora from earth and adorned her, brought her before the gods:

Quote :
"When he had made the beautiful evil to be the price for the blessing (of fire), he brought her out ... to the place where the other gods and men were. And wonder took hold of the deathless gods and mortal men when they saw that which was sheer guile, not to be withstood by men."

The legacy of both myths, combined in the antithetical prose of John Chrysostom in the fourth century AD, shows how taken he was with Hesiod’s idea of woman as a ‘beautiful evil’ (Greek: kalon kakon): "What else is woman but a foe to friendship, an inescapable punishment, a necessary evil, a natural temptation, a desirable calamity, a domestic danger, a delectable detriment, an evil nature, painted with fair colours?"

Phillips points out that there is a ‘tantalizing hint’ that one version of the story that came before Hesiod’s story 'presented a man or a woman with two jars, one containing kalon - good, and the other kakon - evil, and left humanity to choose. By Hesiod’s time, or perhaps by his own hand, the two jars had become one and Pandora had become a kalon kokon.'

The image of the female figure with two jars or urns may carry the same idea as the Minoan goddess with her two snakes, and the urn used for storing oil or wine, and even for burial, was found all over Crete and ancient Greece. The precise contrast of ‘hindsight’ and ‘foresight’ in the names of the two brothers supports this further suggestion of a choice between opposites, and indeed Origen explicitly compares the story of the forbidden urn with that of the forbidden fruit. Also Hermes, the guide of souls and trickster god of imagination and divine curiosity, who gives Pandora her name, voice and wily nature, plays a similar role to the serpent in that both disturb the status quo and precipitate change.

It was Erasmus who, anticipating quite exactly the notion of a Freudian slip, turned pithos, jar or urn, into pyxis, box (slang for female genitals), so imposing an indelible sexual innuendo on the original vessel, once the sacred body of the mother goddess containing and conferring all the gifts of life and death. Dora and Erwin Panofsky put forward the interesting idea that Erasmus’ ‘mistake’ was a fusion or confusion of Pandora with Psyche, the bride of Cupid (the Greek Eros), son of Venus (the Greek Aphrodite), in Apuleius’ tale of Cupid and Psyche in The Golden Ass. Psyche, in the last of the tasks set her by Venus, is given a pyxis, which she is to carry down to Hades and fill with a little bit of Persephone’s beauty. She obtains the pyxis, ‘filled and sealed’, but cannot resist the temptation of opening it, when she is overcome by the vapours released from it and faints, only then to be rescued by Cupid. The point of the analogy that probably appealed to Erasmus, already steeped in the tradition of Eve, was the capacity of women to succumb to temptation, and so to place subjective desire before objective command."

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Quote :
"From a psychoanalytic perspective, Pandora’s box refers to structurally distinct conscious and preconscious secrets, as well as to the repressed unconscious metaphorical danger, which is hidden from awareness.  If released from repression or suppression, and/or projected externally, the contents would be perilous to the individual, the family, and/or society.  These mythical dangers, however, are the opposite of the psychoanalytic process. In clinical psychoanalysis, lifting repression, suspending censorship, and revealing secrets all contribute to therapeutic action and progress.

In Calderon’s drama, "The Statue of Prometheus," Pandora is not the first mortal woman, but rather retains the image and attributes of a goddess.  Presented with a very attractive box as a present, Pandora is curious but unsuspecting as she disregards the prohibition and opens the vessel.  The two brothers, Prometheus and Epimetheus and their allies fight over her and all sing in despair "Woe to him who saw good change to bad, and bad to worse."  (Panofsky  & Panofsky, 1962, p 119).  In the end Prometheus marries Pandora with the union as a metaphor for the harmonious fusion of art and science.

In 1773, Goethe wrote a play about Pandora, a life-long interest. In the play, Prometheus stoops before the image of Pandora, addressing his self-made statue with a paean of praise:

Goethe wrote:
"Pandora, sacred vessel of all gifts that are delightful under the broad sky on the infinite earth….all that which I have ever tasted as a pure radiance of heaven and a calm pleasure of the soul…all this – my Pandora."  (Panofsky & Panofsky, 1962, p 123).  

She is presented as an innocent beautiful bright girl who has learned from her father the secrets of life and death.   Later in 1806, Goethe was attracted to a lady whom he gave the pseudonym Pandora.  When she left he wrote a second play, "Pandora," in which Pandora loses her lover and is left with grief and longing for his return.  Goethe suggests a connection between the myth and madness, and the relationship between art and the irrational.

Pandora has been painted and sculpted by artists of the ages in many different styles.   Henry Moore did several sculptures of Pandora.  For Dante Rossetti, Pandora is depicted as a sensuous beauty with deeply shadowed eyes, holding a golden box from which a cloud of evil spirits escapes.  Swinburne described the painting as "among Rossetti’s mightiest in God-like terror, an imperial trouble of beauty, shadowed by the smoke and fiery vapor of winged and fleshless passions crowding from the casket in spires of flame-lit and curling cloud around her fatal face and mourning veil of hair."  (Panofsky & Panofsky, 1962, p 109).  Paul Klee’s drawing (1920), conveys the traditional psychoanalytic symbolic meaning of Pandora, representing Pandora’s Box as a kantharos vase with evil escaping as vapor through a thinly disguised representation of open female genitalia.  Max Beckmann’s painting (1947) depicts an explosive fiery scene, as a metaphor for devastation.  In this connection, Pandora is not infrequently encountered in the writings and cartoons of the news media, i.e., with reference of the horrors of war, the Holocaust, and the  epidemic of HIV. Pandora’s box has become a general metaphor for the eruption of violence and destruction.  Pandora, in the ancient myth, also represents the phallic, castrating, devouring witch of literature and fairy tale.  Faced with the technological capacity to destroy civilization, humanity, like Epimetheus, may become wise too late.

Pandora’s box also represents the conscious or pre-conscious personal and/or familial secrets, contained or suppressed within the box.  Shared secrets, in silent collusion, become important components of the relationship between the secret sharers.  Secrecy and silence of the object world exacerbates traumatic experience, often associated with the isolation of affect, with parts of the self and object kept compartmentalized in a Pandora’s box.  The traumatized person, often sensing that a dark secret is being withheld, is afraid to open the box; curiosity is inhibited.  The traumatized person may be left in doubt about what happened in reality. Affective awareness may be further blunted by concern for the welfare of love objects.  In the case of child abuse, an adult authority’s false claims that nothing really happened, or that all that happened was innocent will further the child’s denial of reality.  The child may be left in perpetual doubt.  If the child feels caught in an abusive quandary with no exit, then hope too is sequestered in Pandora’s box.  For persons with fragile reality testing, massive denial of external and internal danger may eventuate in a psychosis.  Pandora’s box could lose its symbolic or metaphorical meaning and encapsulating function."

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Flowers hold whorls and worlds of secrets, enclosing one after the other. "Tearing down the veil" and "delving deep into the mysteries" is the modern fetish [fatisso, from Portuguese feitiço "charm, sorcery, allurement," noun use of an adjective meaning "artificial"] with toxins and intoxications; flowers become furs...

Venetian beauty has an "over-perfect", "over-complete" sense of artificial plasticity to it, observable in the near pandora doll-like faces of many Taurean and Libran models.

Speaking of repressed tendencies, Satanic BDSM and Deleuze's "Venus in Furs" has ben explored [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].



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One repercussion of the Promethean myth setting off the decline from the golden-age, is men now no longer dine with the gods, or partake of the food of the gods - [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], the "unbroken knowledge":

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"In the story of Cupid and Psyche as told by Apuleius, Psyche is given ambrosia upon her completion of the quests set by Venus and her acceptance on Olympus. After she partakes, she and Cupid are wed as gods."

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Likewise, in Vedic mythology of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] between the gods and the demons, makes surface up the nectar of immortality, ocassioning the wedding of Vishnu and Sri, whose name like Pandora means "all-endowed"/"prosperity"/"victory conferring sovereign mark", yet also "elusive, fickle and changing as fortune"…

In many paintings, the ambrosia is depicted in a small pithos held by a pharmako-poet, whose spilled nectarine drops create sacred spaces of hope and resistance to the fallen iron age:

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The myth is a metaphor for breathing/the churning of the mind and the hidden unconscious, by the coiled kundalini around the spinal column. The release of ambrosia as opening of the 1000 petalled flower chakra - re-turning the fire to the head.



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Nietzsche writes in WTP, to question oneself is already a sign of a broken instinct, in the sense,
perfection rests on unhesitant execution, self-mastery of instincts become first nature.

It is satanic to question, to lust after every "X", to pry open and peer into the abyss... introspection as with Hamlet is a broken seal, opening the box of the unconscious, that could paralyze the self with immobility, indecisiveness, paranoia of evils lurking, doubt, distrust… the self is dis-Mantled.

One could read that as the pain of individuation, or as the fragmentation of being into shards of mirrors.
One either attains to innocence, or de-composes into a chameleon of shifting anarchic centres, a mirror double of the hy-bridal many-eyed Sphinx, a Jesus of dis-Mantled "un-bound" love.

The tragi-comedy of those who feel the Satanic rush of freedom and individuality, while being the ones still sheltered "in the box" is a modern dis/ease. But its a mistake to assume that Satanism is only all that is dirty, filthy, messy; it is also a Pleasure from Over-perfectionism - the over-clean, the over-pure, bloodless, techne driven vir-ility of beautiful bodies and viagra masculinities. An apocalyptical [lifting the veil] VenUsed-virgo...

Quote :
"The unreal world of Virtual Reality.

Etymologically, ‘virtual’ signifies strength and manliness. Lee Quinby, in his essay on “Virile Reality,” could have left the term “virtual” unaltered because the idea of virility is definitely contained in the virtual. For Quinby, Virile Reality is “mediated violence, clean war, and computer games” (Quinby, 1999, p. 1083) necessarily producing a “Viagra Effect” which is “a union of simulation and flesh that assumes penile erection to be the be-all and end-all of sexual pleasure” (p. 1084). Through Viagra, sexual virility is put at the center of sexual culture, but it resides there not as a real quality (openly adopting a full-fledged macho posture) but rather virtually.

Viagra dematerializes desire and turns it into a virtual quality that is always potentially available and can be made present at any moment by a drug: “The assumption seems to be that if you can get the penis ‘functioning’ properly, desire will follow and/or simply be enacted” (Marshall, 2002, p. 136).

What all this means is that the Viagra vision of sex does not negate the existence of desire nor does it declare desire to be ever-present, but that it incorporates desire into its mechanical model in the form of an ever-present potential quality. By declaring desire to be neither present nor absent but virtual, scientists circumvent the existence of the soulless ego-body described by Robert Redeker.

How can the body be soulless if there is desire? For Viagra scientists, undesired, disinterested, “mindless sex ‘like a battery man’ (i.e. in the fashion of an automaton)” (Potts, 2004a, p. 5) is simply impossible. For them, the Viagra body is not a machine-body with a techno-implanted desire, but a “natural” body that has been refashioned until it has become “more ‘real’ than the real thing” (Mamo & Fishman, 2001, p. 21).

Using Redeker’s terminology, we can say that inside the Viagra-enhanced “appliance-body” of constantly flowing energy, the drug will finally work like nature: “The user is unable to tell where his body leaves off and technology begins; it is a seamless, ‘natural’ integration” (Mamo & Fishman, ibid.). However, this is a fallacy because “real” desire has no place in the Viagra model. Real desire is not a potential quantity readily available within a linear script of foreplay to intercourse to orgasm. It is part of a politics of pleasure “fought out” in real space." [Thorsten Bornstein, Viagra and the Virtual]

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"This [apocalyptic masculinity] is manifest in the combat myth as described by Norman Cohn, with the man-killing wars that Revelation revels in, as well as the brutal treatment of Jezebel and the gleeful cannibalization and burning of the Whore of Babylon (Cohn 1993). Such portrayals remain popular in contemporary Christian youth culture which fuses super heroes with archangel figures. Christian comic books, for example, promote versions of manhood which foster identification with millennial masculinity as a blurring of supernatural and human macho. Such seemingly innocent pieces of religious entertainment and instruction keep patriarchy palpable.

The third component of apocalyptic masculinity is perfectionism. The ideal of perfection is the culminating millennial moment of the Revelation, that longed for eternity without death or disease, without enemies to defeat, indeed, without women. The dream of perfection emerged within the patriarchal context of apocalyptic thought. It has lasted into the modern era by entering into New Age spirituality as well as technological prowess. These recent expressions of the ideal of perfection work in concert with a new power formation, which I call “programmed perfection” (Quinby 1999).

This set of power/knowledge relations promises to bring a millennial vision to earth through information and biological technologies. The vision hasn’t gravitated all that far from its patriarchal roots, however. Revelation’s New Jerusalem is a site in which only men--specifically those who have not been “defiled with women” ascend to god-like status (Revelation 14:3-4).

Similarly, in techno-millennialism, reproduction without female agency is a major goal; when female bodies are used, as in cloning or ventilated pregnant cadavers, for example, they are regarded as laboratory vessels.

Millennial perfection thus remains purely masculine. Again popular culture reinforces such practices. Toys like X-Men, who are mutants who have transcended certain bodily constraints and bear names like Archangel II, foster a desire for perfection understood as super-embodiment. Games like Dungeons and Dragons fuse together the physical and supernatural in the name of total apocalyptic destruction of designated enemies with millennial reward of achieved victory."
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 07, 2016 2:56 pm

Fascinating reading again. A few supporting comments for now on two aspects.

The esoteric astrology developed by the lineage of Blavatsky, 'the Tibetan' and later the frighteningly powerful witch-type Alice Bailey, works with 7 rays, in which the planetary influences along with their outer-cosmic counterparts, are interpreted as belonging to these rays.

I will summarize them from memory.

Ray 1: Will and Power; ruled by Pluto and Vulcan.
Ray 2: Love; ruled by Sun and Jupiter
Ray 3: Creative Intelligence; ruled by Saturn
Ray 4: Creation from Opposites; ruled by Mercury
Ray 5: Knowledge; ruled by Venus
Ray 6: Idealism; ruled by Neptune and Mars
Ray 7: Ritual Magic; ruled by Uranus.

The rays pertain tot he signs as well, so different types of rulerships are extended; Venus/Ray 5 is said to rule the Leo-Aquarius axis.

I never quite got this, but the comprehensiveness of the quoted typification is explanatory.

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I agree with this typification of psychoanalysis vs what we may call the Pandora-warning.
Having been in a kind of analysis once, I can absolutely concur; it was a Pandoras box; every little issues I addressed blew up in my, and the therapists face and caused enormous mayhem and instability.

As soon as I allowed an outside to start pulling at the threads, the whole fabric of life seemed to be held together by the very volatility of its elements.
Just like an atom is held together, perhaps, by enormous tension and contradiction; so a mans soul is held together, and the psychoanalyst naively attempts to effect a fission in the psyche, not aware of the violence he will unleash;
psychoanalysis is in this sense anti-cultural, it unravels.
Socrates was perhaps the first Shrink - the first dishonest soul clever enough to reverse the notions of honesty and dishonesty; the reversal of honorability - so very different from Honor, which can not be reversed.

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Sin vs Crime;
A thought I had last night;

Weak sin vs Strong sin
Weak virtue vs Strong virtue

Weak sin is wretchedness, wish for satisfaction born out of wretchedness, starvation; Brown.
Strong sin is Crime in the Nietzschean sense; Gold and Black.

Weak virtue is wretchedness, wish for safety born out of fundamental inability to take care of oneself; Beige.
Strong virtue is Godly in the Greek sense; Gold as 'primus inter pares' inside a full spectrum.



In one sense, strong Sin/good Crime brings out the greatest power of gold, of the soul, the man, because of the stark contrasts it produces.

In another sense, strong Virtue brings out the most natural quality of gold, of the world, the society, because of its kinship to all elements of distinct qualities; everything, in this 'scheme', is necessary.


The difference between weak and strong in both cases can be found in the degrees of distinctness of the qualities. Weakness has no distinction to it.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:11 am

Shakespeare wrote:
Venus to Adonis:

"Fondling," she saith, "since I have hemm'd thee here
Within the circuit of this ivory pale.
I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer:
Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale;
Graze on my lips, and if those hills be dry,
Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie." [Venus and Adonis, 229-234]

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Shakespeare wrote:
Adonis to Venus:

"I hate not love, but your device in love,
That lends embracements unto every stranger.
You do it for increase: O strange excuse!
When reason is the bawd to lust’s abuse." [Venus and Adonis, 789-98]

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_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:12 am

Excellent essay on the sweet-voracity of satanic Venus.


Callaghan wrote:
"'Tis true, 'tis true, thus was Adonis slain:
         He ran upon the boar with his sharp spear,
         Who did not whet his teeth at him again,
         But by a kiss thought to persuade him there;
         And nuzzling in his flank, the loving swine
         Sheath'd unaware the tusk in his soft groin."

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Renaissance Ovidian poetry with its emphasis on illicit sexual desire and "unnatural" consummation, as well as metamorphosis, represents the disturbing capacity to "turn man into a very beast," to effect, like bestiality, an "unlawful conjunction," "which is a most abominate confusion." That is, poetic metaphor contains the propensity to convert the human into the animal, or more radically, in the specific context of metamorphosis, to reduce it to the vegetative matter at the base of nature.

Consistent with the Ovidian world of forbidden wishes, the death of Adonis constitutes the fatal consummation of interspecies desire:

"I know not love," quoth he, "nor will not know it,
Unless it be a boar, and then I chase it." (409-10)

A painfully comic measure of Adonis's profound alienation from his own species, "the tusk in his soft groin" serves as a grotesque parody of the legal definition of bestiality, "carnall knowledge" of a brute, as explained by Sir Edward Coke in The Third Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England (1644):

"[T]here must be penetratio, that is, res in re, either with beast, but the least penetration maketh it carnall knowledge." Coke's solemn explication cannot fully anticipate a scenario, such as the one outlined by Venus, where the animal and not the human, "the loving swine," is the active sexual partner.

Certainly, the poem's comic imputations about bestiality had serious ramifications in a culture where, as Keith Thomas points out: "The frequency with which bestiality was denounced by contemporary moralists suggests that the temptation could be a real one."
Similarly in the widely circulated Domesticall Duties, William Gouge finds it necessary to point out the importance of selecting as a marriage partner another human being, "One of the same Kinde or nature":

    "for among all the creatures which were made, there was not found an helpe meet for man: therefore God out of his bone and flesh made a woman of his owne nature and Kinde.

    Contrary to this is the detestable sinne of buggery with beasts, expressly forbidden by the law."

Yet, Adonis is unequivocal in his election of the boar over Venus, a choice which the poem constructs within a specifically sexual context. Thomas Middleton's A Mad World My Masters (c. 1604), a play which explicitly references Venus and Adonis (I. ii. 44), offers an interesting cultural reflection on the implications of such an erotic choice. In this play, "The worst [creature] that ever breathes" (IV. iii.), "a wild boar," is punningly extrapolated as and conflated with "a vild whore, Sir" (IV. iii. 71-5). Both sexual and species difference here articulate the contradictory, driving forces of attraction and repulsion that characterize heterosexual and misogynist male desire. This double nature of desire, however, is apparent not only in terms of men's conflicted feelings about female sexuality, but also, astonishingly, in relation to pigs.

The indistinction of boundaries between animal and human sexuality, on the one hand, and animal ferocity and divine vengeance on the other, is played out, most vividly in Venus's own identification of her lust for Adonis with that of the boar:

"Had I been tooth'd like him, I must confess
With kissing him I should have killed him first."

There is, indeed, a cultural consensus on the libidinous nature of boars. Andrew Willet emphasizes both the similarities between human coitus and the mating habits of boars in Hexapla, a commentary on Leviticus:

"This kinde of creature is prone unto lust, and more then [sic] commonly other are: for at eight moneths they begin to couple; and when they begin, they keepe not their seasons and times of the yeere, as other beasts doe, but at all times, and night and day they come together."

Venus herself relates to Adonis the terrifying demeanor of the boar, "a mortal butcher" whose back has "a battle set Of bristly pikes," whose "snout digs sepulchers where're he goes," and "whom he strikes his crooked tushes slay" (619-24). Edward Topsell's natural history of the period, The History of Foure-Footed Beasts, paints a similarly vivid portrait not just of the boar's ferocity, but also of his savage lust:

"[B]eing inflamed with venereal rage, he so fretteth upright the bristles of his neck, that you would take them to be the sharp fins of Dolphins; then champeth he with his mouth, grateth and gnasheth his teeth one against another, and breathing forth his boyling spirit, not only at his eys, but at his foaming white mouth, he desireth nothing but copulation, and if his female endure him quietly, then doth She satisfie his lust, and kill all his anger; but if she refuse, then doth he either constrain her against her will or else layeth her dead upon the earth."

Crucially, the boar's violent sexual aggression is connected by Topsell with a refusal of coitus. In this, the boar has a ferocious, vengeful, and specifically masculine energy:
"[T]he males have upon that occasion deadly and strange fights, one with another, and the wilde Boares whet their tuskes against trees for the fight."

While the boar has an inescapably masculine dimension, Venus's identification with this beast also resembles that between the goddess Diana and the boar of Calydon in Book VIII of the Metamorphosis, "The which Diana for to wreake her wrath conceyvde" (360), and "In great Orithyas thigh a wound with hooked groyne he drew" (497). Thus, Adonis's boar "always has the double role of being both the Goddess, infernalized and enraged, and her infernal consort (Mars in boar form)."

The rejected Goddess comes to emerge in her animal form, claiming in violence what she has been denied in love.
The boar, then, has mythological connotations of taking vengeance on behalf of rejected yet powerful women.

Contemporary moralists such as Richard Capel argued that human beings are tempted to "unnaturall sins" like bestiality and incest because "Sathan hath no naturality in him, for he lost all in his fall: the Law of Nature was not given to him" (Capel 52; 53-4).

Even Venus in her sexual persona as Nature is given to perverse, and therefore "unnatural" desire, signaled in the poem not only by Adonis's indifference to her but also by the uneasily semi-incestuous tenor of her designs upon him. Not only, says Capel, will the devil "tempt on both sides of the hedge if he can," but also as he points out, in a remark which is of considerable relevance to the psychosexual dynamics of the poem: "It is our corrupt humor, to be strongest where we are denied."

The blindly procreative aspect of her divinity represented by Venus genetrix together with her rapacity as Venus vulgaris offers a reminder that Venus's identity is essentially non-human, both bestial and immortal. Crucially, also, the poem signals her specifically maternal and feminine propinquity to the animal kingdom. Amid parodic and overtly bestial variations on coitus, there is also some very heavy petting:

"Fondling," she saith, "since I have hemm'd thee here
Within the circuit of this ivory pale.
I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer:
Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale;
Graze on my lips, and if those hills be dry,
Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie." (229-234)

Venus's outlandish imagery reverses the familiar poetic trope whereby the woman is the poet's hunted hind (as, for example in Sir Thomas Wyatt's Petrarchan Whoso List to Hunt, I Know Where is an Hind) and Adonis as "deer" is reminiscent of Mistress Ford's mockery of Falstaff's romantic rhetoric in Merry Wives: "Sir John? art thou my there, my deer? My male deer?" (V. v. 16-17).

"Feed where thou wilt," an invitation to the breast (the "mountain") and to cunnilingus ("lower where the pleasant fountains lie"), further positions Venus in a simultaneously maternal and sexual relation to Adonis. It is the liminal condition of femininity that signals Venus's alliance with nature. Within a single animal identity, she is possessed of an almost instinctive sexual voracity and maternal nurture: "With blindfold fury she begins to forage" (554); "glutton-like she feeds, but never filleth" (548). Venus's animal insatiability as a mother bears some resemblance to a phenomenon described by E. Fenton in Certaine Secrete Wonders of Nature (1569). In this account, the all-consuming appetites of a pregnant woman are such that she turns not beast but cannibal, the terrifying embodiment of devouring femininity: "lusting to eate the flesh of a faire boy.

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Her simultaneously amorous and motherly address to Adonis as "Fondling," also, connotes both pet and infant, and blurs the boundaries between sexual and non-sexual relations. Adonis becomes Venus's animal familiar, her protected game, a deer/dear within "this ivory pale" (240). In petting the "fondling" Adonis, Venus transgresses--and perhaps, transcends--both interspecies, intergenerational, and intrafamilial distinctions. Pet keeping is inescapably parental, making the beast part of the family, obscuring the division between kin and kind. Thus, as moralists continually reminded their readers, "The change is easie, from naturall love to Carnall."

Of course, the relationship of pethood is precisely (or, rather, ideally) not-sexual, though it is so as much on grounds of incest as of bestiality. Incest and bestiality are, in fact, versions of one another, and neither prohibition is necessary or "natural." In a sense, Adonis finds himself caught between the suffocating passions of the maternal Venus, and the ferocious embrace of a "loving swine." In this situation, connection between "kin" and "kind" (Hamlet I. ii. 65), or rather, the imperative to make the distinction between them, becomes critical. If Venus can keep Adonis as a pet, she can possess him both as child and lover, human and animal.

Adonis is child-like in relation to Venus: "'Fie, fie' he says, 'you crush me. Let me go. / You have no reason to withhold me so'" (611-12). That his petulant protests also represent, symbolically at least, a proleptic response to castration is confirmed by the description of Adonis's ravaged corpse: "In his soft flank, whose wonted lily-white / With purple tears that his wound wept was drenched."

Adonis's mother bears in the poem an important connection with the aberrant desires of Venus. As Venus genetrix mother goddess of omnipresent fecundity, Venus urges indiscriminate copulation: "By law of nature thou art bound to breed" (171),51 and, crucially, she does so by way of the poem's central reference to Myrrha:

"O, had thy mother borne so hard a mind,
She had not brought forth thee, but died unkind." (202-3)

Here, Venus represents Myrrha as being less self-enclosed, ("incestuous" in the broader sense) than her son. Myrrha would have "died unkind" if she hadn't loved a man and thus borne a child" but " it would have been better if she had died untouched by her own kind" (Bate 85).

Critics of Venus and Adonis have long suggested that Shakespeare might have known Titian's painting of the reluctant Adonis, anxious to be on his way to the boar,

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but a more appropriate visual analog is Bronzino's late sixteenth century Allegory of Venus and Cupid, where mother and (adolescent rather than cherubic infant) son are "locked in a peculiarly sensual embrace."

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Of course, Bronzino's Cupid is no reluctant Adonis, but the painting does suggest the incestuous overtones of even Venus's maternal aspect as mother of Cupid. Richard McCabe's remarks on this painting, whose figures strike him as "reptilian" ("not merely in the contrived contortion of the limbs, but in the narrowed, mesmeric eyes and the thin wedge of tongue obscenely parting the goddess's lips"), are also remarkably apposite for Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis: "It would appear that the ultimate expression of eroticism necessitates the ultimate confusion of animal and human nature, the ultimate desecration of kinship."

The most incestuous moment in the poem represents a return to nature of the most extreme, but literary kind. "Poor flower," quoth she, "this was thy father's guise,-- / Sweet issue of a more sweet-smelling sire," the anemone seems to be, like the flower in A Midsummer Night's Dream, which represents Elizabeth's virginity, an emblem of chastity:

"And in his blood that on the ground lay spill'd,
A purple flower sprung up, checkere'd with white,
Resembling well his pale cheeks and the blood
Which in round drops upon their whiteness stood." (1165-1170)

Always predisposed to rot rather than to reproduce, "For flowers that are not gathered in their prime / Rot, and consume themselves in little time" (131-2), Adonis remains immured in the world of great creating nature, which has consumed and regenerated him according to its cycles:

"Here was thy father's bed, here in my breast.
Thou art the next of blood, and 'tis thy right.
Lo, in this hollow cradle take thy rest;
My throbbing heart shall rock thee day and night,
There shall not be one minute in an hour
Wherein I will not kiss my sweet love's flower."

Mythologically speaking, of course, Adonis has always been biodegradable. The anemone, into which Adonis is transformed in the Metamorphosis, is associated by Ovid with the fruit revealed when the rind of the pomegranate was removed. In a sense Adonis here, returns to his Ovidian origins because he was born from the weeping cypress tree to which his mother was confined. Fissuring the bark/rind from which he emerges, Adonis comes to figure the permeability of the boundaries of "kind."

Rigorously self-cultivating even before he becomes a flower, Adonis argues: "Who plucks the bud before one leaf put forth" (416); "The mellow plum doth fall, the green sticks fast, / Or, being early plucked is sour to taste" (517-22). But now, in his final metamorphosis, he literally becomes an object of cultivation, a plant and a "cult," namely the pagan cult of Adonis. Unlike the naturalistic depictions of the host of nature's creatures in the poem--the boar, the deer, the hare, the eagle, the horse, the jennet, the snail--the depiction of the flower is completely emblematic. This is because, as Leonard Barkan has so acutely observed, the artistic effect of metamorphosis is "to transform human identities into images."

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The emblematic status of flowers seems, oddly, to have intensified during the spectacular growth of domestic flower cultivation in Elizabethan England. One the new flowers introduced was the wild anemone, and, at the same time, potted plants, known as "Gardens of Adonis" also became popular. That is, the cultural understanding of flowers as signifiers is actually, though perhaps paradoxically, continuous with horticultural advances, which, as Polixenes points out in The Winter's Tale, had served only to complicate the distinctions between nature and culture: "The art itself is nature" (IV. 4. 97). Cultivation does not so much usurp the art of nature as erase the boundary between the natural and the artificial. Significantly, the "art" to which Polixenes refers is constituted by the vegetative equivalent of the incest taboo: "we marry / A gentle scion to the wildest stock / And make conceive a bark of baser kind / By a bud of nobler race" (IV. 4. 88-97). In this instance, inbreeding is antipathetic to cultivation, and thence to culture.

Demarcations between nature and culture have also been part of the poem's critical mythology, which has long maintained that Shakespeare made such an art of nature in Venus and Adonis that he may have composed the poem while he was still in Stratford and had not yet been inducted into the sophistication of metropolitan culture. In Muriel Bradbrook's (mistaken) verdict: "Shakespeare still had some heavy provincial Warwickshire loam sticking to his boots." Although distinctions between nature and culture are all too easily trivialized, it is worth remembering that, in essence, Reformation theology addressed itself to the question of how the animal aspects of human nature, the "corrupt flesh" (Capel 408) estranged human beings from God, while the exultant spirit of the Renaissance celebrated humanity's divine potential as "the paragon of the animals" (Hamlet II. ii). As Golding put it in the Epistle to his translation of the Metamorphoses:

"Our soule is wee endewed by God with reason from above;
Our bodie is but as our house, in which wee worke and move.
T'one part is common to us all with God of heaven himself;
Th'other common with the beastes, a vyle and stinking self." (Golding's Epistle,102-6; p. 426)

That Golding was the translator of both Ovid and Calvin exemplifies the irreconcilable contradictions of Renaissance humanism and radical Protestantism, which were being played out in relation to the status of poetry at the end of the sixteenth century.

The epyllion in particular seemed dedicated to frivolity and delight, to what human beings have in "common with the beastes, a vyle and stinking self" rather than to the more sober task of Protestant aesthetics. In fact, Shakespeare's poem works over these contradictions in human nature, or rather the contradictions between the human and the natural. The poem's naturalistic images of wildlife at one end of the spectrum, the mythically voracious boar, and (ostensibly one of the most frivolous images of the poem) Venus's deer park, at the other, bespeak the inherent perversity of desire and are precisely what lend the poem its tragic-comic quality. By repeatedly transgressing the discrete taxonomies of human and animal, nature and culture, the poem's images render them demonstrably artificial categories. In so doing, Venus and Adonis conveys with singular poignancy the (un)naturalness of loving where we should not love, or where we are not wanted."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:15 am

Nuptial - what is mine is yours and what is yours is mine.

"Cross my heart and swear to die."


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Pre-nup - what is mine is mine and what is yours is yours.

"An eye for an eye, tooth for tooth."


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:21 am

Nuptial - what is mine is yours and what is yours is mine. 

"Cross my heart and swear to die."


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Pre-nup - what is mine is mine and what is yours is yours.

"An eye for an eye, tooth for tooth."


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:34 am

Nietzsche in the light of what pre-nups mean.
[One is able to see Tiwaz better.]

The basic tissue of life is the warp and the woof orthogonal tension, the weaving of which forms the first sheath, and the first sheet. Textus - as not only what it is, but also upon where it i written are both related to the fabric, fabrication, fable, etc. - the weaving of songs and metres. 
Man-tras - mind-armours are making song chariots to help uplift one to the highest illumination. 
It is a mind-making - which is the intellectual air element of the libra. On the down-side, it is also in the sense of their oscillatiing indecisiveness of 'making up one's mind'. 

In the Nuptial ceremony of the Greek Krevatia, or the I.E. hand-fasting and blessing of the first-night bed, the interwoven kosmic mantle spread over is likewise called bed-making, like mind-making. 

As detailed here, it is a compelling case to consider that Ariadne's undoing of the labyrinthine/winding thread to guide Theseus in slaying the hybrid, is the dismantling of her wedding with him:

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It is inescapable that where one labyrinth is undone, another is also undone. Life comes at the cost of life. 

We may also say, if the Nuptial is an eye for an aye, Pre-nups are an eye for an eye. 

Odin's sacrifice of his eye into Mimir's well gives birth to runes, to life,… yet, there is a justice to be had. The wolf of chaos too must have its share. Odin's "gift" is approximated by Tyr's "contract". 
No escape.

Wherever a centre of gravity is attained by nuptial sacrifice over generations, it emerges as a point of balance where life flourishes from possessing diverse counter-weights. Man - as a chain of the whole organic past - becomes a standard of value and evaluator of worth, worth-ships. "Man as measure", in this sense. In Ister, Heidegger called this principle of the "middle" - the gathering pole, the terrific arch, or mantle of dike, under which everything pertains to its 'dignity' of being such and such, through the figure of Anti-gone. Each, abiding in its own secret garden.

Tyr - Tiwaz - Knight and sword of honour, justice… 
The Northmen believed, the sword that was passed down as a heir-"loom"...ing had "seen" all the wars of those who held it.


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Centres of gravity foaming with protracted aims from which value-judgements are rendered and ranked, have for their base-is, the steady and sure instincts from generations.

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To "make-up" one's mind, kosmetic, kosme-techne, the art of arrangement is being decisive - "fate-full", "moment-ous", "pivot-al"… becoming a direct-ion.

De-cisive - to cut-off: eye for an eye, tooth for tooth, measure for measure…, where everything is ac-corded [kerdia/heart to heart] its rightful due by the airy heights/pathos-of-distance of one's power - de-termination.
Alloting each its share…; such al-Lot-ments are literally fate-full:

Quote :
"[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] bhaga is a term for "lord, patron", but also for "wealth, prosperity". The cognate term in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] and [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is baga, of uncertain meaning but used in a sense in which "lord, patron, sharer/distributor of good fortune" might also apply. The cognate in Slavic languages is the root [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], Polish bogaty Serbo-Croatian bogat, Russian богатый(bogatyj, "wealthy"), and hence "illustrious, divine, venerable, holy", etc The semantics is similar to English [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (from [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] "bread-warden"), the idea being that it is part of the function of a chieftain or leader to distribute riches or spoils among his followers. The name of the city of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] derives from Middle Persian baga-data, "lord-given". Elsewhere, the Bhaga continues as a god of wealth and marriage.

The common noun 
bhaga survives as a fiscal term, and in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] for "one who possesses (-van) the properties of a bhaga-", hence itself "lord, god"; and in bhagya, and "that which derives from bhaga", hence "destiny"/luck as an abstract noun."

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Life is the accumulation of force, of many Janus-heads, multi-polarities without dwindling into opposites. 
Power differentiating many values - the de-cisive cut between man and beast, man and plant, beast and man and overman, etc. - such mind-making is growing the scales of sensitivity. The scales becoming more and more delicate to subtle stimuli, communicates more and more with less and less… -  "The flower of Adonis as "emblem"…", as (arch-e-)type.

As example, the swastika became and is the emblem for many things.


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(Devil from diaballein is to 'throw across'; Enballein is inlaid ornamental work from "to throw in"…
The devil is needed to scatter, shatter, break apart, discriminate one from an other…, the forming of mirror doubles)

Emblematic: Life grows richer, more meaning-full, more value-Able - fore-casting greater and greater tasks and goals becomes easier with estimates. The man confident in life and himself dares more. Playing dice and dare-devil with the gods…

The man who can do without 'pre-nups with life'…
Who can afford to be deceived, who can afford to be defeated for higher victories, who can afford disadvantages, who can afford the innocence of all becomings…
The fool in whom wisdom hides, the warrior whom truth weds… [truth - a mobile army; cosmos - arrange troops for battle]

It is Nuptial love that pools, binds, harmonizes and inter-weaves many re-sources and diverse configurations together. Over generations, one creates the possibility for a well-rounded exceptional type - a vessel of stored force and excess - the tempt-ation for great at-tempts, experiments… philosophy, mind-making.

New types possibly emerge. 
All of history at one end of the scale is counter-balanced by him in the other…

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jul 13, 2016 11:46 am

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The Anglo-Irish have a peculiar way of phrasing one is attracted to someone, with the words,

"You bother me."

It comes from Irish bodhairim "I deafen."

Related is 'perturb', from per- "through" + turbare "disturb, confuse, bewilder" from turba "turmoil, crowd"; Greek tyrbe "turmoil, tumult, disorder," from PIE *(s)twer- "to turn, whirl", "storm".

To Turn, to Deviate from the course one was on - that "swerve" corresponds to Venus:

Greenblatt wrote:
"Lucretius observed in passages of remarkable frankness that in the very act of
sexual consummation lovers remain in the grip of confused longings that they cannot fulfill:

"Even in the hour of possession the passion of the lovers fluctuates and wanders in uncertainty: they cannot decide what to enjoy first with their eyes and hands. They tightly squeeze the object of their desire and cause bodily pain, often driving their teeth into one another’s lips and crushing mouth against mouth." (4.1076–81)

The point of this passage—part of what W. B. Yeats called “the finest description of sexual intercourse ever written”—is not to urge a more decorous, tepid form of lovemaking. It is to take note of the element of unsated appetite that haunts even the fulfillment of desire. The insatiability of sexual appetite is, in Lucretius’ view, one of Venus’ cunning strategies; it helps to account for the fact that, after brief interludes, the same acts of love are performed again and again. And he understood too that these repeated acts are deeply pleasurable. But he remained troubled by the ruse, by the emotional suffering that comes in its wake, by the arousal of aggressive impulses, and, above all, by the sense that even the moment of ecstasy leaves something to be desired. In 1685, the great poet John Dryden brilliantly captured Lucretius’ remarkable vision:

"...when the youthful pair more closely join,
When hands in hands they lock, and thighs in thighs they twine;
Just in the raging foam of full desire,
When both press on, both murmur, both expire,
They grip, they squeeze, their humid tongues they dart,
As each would force their way to th’others heart.
In vain; they only cruise about the coast.
For bodies cannot pierce, nor be in bodies lost,
As sure they strive to be, when both engage
In that tumultuous momentary rage.
So tangled in the nets of love they lie,
Till man dissolves in that excess of joy."" [How The World Became Modern]
           
The Turn of the Venus is as the turn-On - stirring, seduction, (a)rousing from which we derive the semantics of dawn, of day-Break, to Spring into being, to awaken from sleep and nightly inertia, light-bringing (lucifer), to provoke to activity, to arise, originate...

The "swerve" is the Satanic concept of the Clinamen:

Quote :
"Clinamen (/klaɪˈneɪmən/; plural clinamina, derived from clīnāre, to incline) is the Latin name Lucretius gave to the unpredictable swerve of atoms, in order to defend the atomistic doctrine of Epicurus.

According to Lucretius, the unpredictable swerve occurs "at no fixed place or time":

"When atoms move straight down through the void by their own weight, they deflect a bit in space at a quite uncertain time and in uncertain places, just enough that you could say that their motion has changed. But if they were not in the habit of swerving, they would all fall straight down through the depths of the void, like drops of rain, and no collision would occur, nor would any blow be produced among the atoms. In that case, nature would never have produced anything."

This swerving, according to Lucretius, provides the "free will which living things throughout the world have."

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Inclination to someone, something, to incline is a "Bias":

"slant, slope, oblique", 13c., "sideways, askance, against the grain", which is of unknown origin, probably from Old Provençal biais, with cognates in Old Catalan and Sardinian; possibly from Vulgar Latin *(e)bigassius, from Greek epikarsios "athwart, crosswise, at an angle," from epi- "upon" + karsios "oblique," from PIE *krs-yo-, from root *(s)ker- "to cut"."

A Bias is a "pre-judice", a violation, "profanation", the cut across the "chaste", sacred virgin and the whore…

So we see again, how the Satanic is to strive for the forbidden, for transgression is a crime, knowledge is a dis-crimination, a Bias, a Slope, a "proclivity".
Elegance - eligere - is careful dis-criminate selection, to choose with care.
 
In [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] thread last year, I showed a passage in Nietzsche where Danger and Depression were connected to Saturn, with regard to the Pythagorean hypotenuse, the "slippery" "slope" in opposition to the Orthogonality - saturnine discipline, rightness, law, etc.

In distinguishing between the Saturnine Trickster and the Venus Tempter, we can say the nuance is in between the discipline of habit, and inclinations, intent and tendency/taste, character and refined grace, respectively.
What is fine is delicate, from which we also get delicious:

"delicatus "alluring, delightful, dainty," also "addicted to pleasure, luxurious, effeminate;" which is of uncertain origin; related by folk etymology (and perhaps genuinely) to deliciae "a pet," and delicere "to allure, entice", from de- "away" + lacere "lure, deceive", related to laqueus "noose, snare", "lace"…

Laces and "seduction" - "to lead astray"...
While the "swerve" of Venus, is a turn-On, the caprice of Saturn is "per-verse", literally, "to Over-turn".
There is the slope of incline and the Deviant who breaks off in a tangent like Scheherzade's or Penelope's thread weaving and Wave-Err-ing away, and there is what slips through the gap and over-turns like the carnivalesque Saturnalia; slaves become freemen and freemen slaves - a per-versity.

The tangential - to cheat, impress, strike, hit and slide, to touch gently is related to Tact, and the Tact is related to the Pact that Venus rules Intact.

Aphrodite born of the castrated organs, of the very sickle-cut, keeps the the schism together.
If Saturn is Law as regulation, as judice, as jury, to ob-Serve,, Venus is pre-judice, justice, Purr-view: "provided that", the clause/claws, from,
providere - "look ahead, prepare, supply, act with foresight," from pro- "ahead" + videre "to see". The Promethean.
The Cheat, and the clean Chit.

The tangential, tactiity, also - Tangibility, materiality, gain, riches, treasure.

"Truth [satya] and Order[rta] are born from Fervour [kindling, stroking, striking, colliding, clashing, chance-luck];
"Discipline Breeds Fortune." <> Saturn-Venus.

"Fortune and Fame Crease(rip-ple) and In-Crease(crescent) Social Status." <> Venus-Saturn.

This becomes clear in:

Jane Burns wrote:
"Jean de Meun’s thirteenth-century version of the Roman de la Rose opens with a standard clerical condemnation of courtly love as a kind of incurable torment that enflames the hearts of fools and makes them suffer unrequited desire. Jean’s spokesperson, Lady Reason, further condemns the folly of this consuming love when it becomes a form of covetousness, when the love of bodily pleasures becomes confused with the insatiable love of riches. Different from the reciprocal affection of Ciceronian friendship that Reason condones, the pursuit of physical pleasure and passion more often resembles the obsessive pursuit of tangible material gain, that plagues all rich men and misers (vv. 4744, 4773-75). Not only are merchants, lawyers and doctors driven by this love for profit and terrestrial goods (vv. 5042-61), knights, kings and beggars (v. 5017) also fall under the purview of those who love “to amass treasure” (vv. 5089-92).

Lady, Fortune, is denounced more specifically for using ornate lavish attire to trick and deceive unwary lovers. As her wheel turns, we are told, Fortune moves into the opposite chamber of her house, “dirty, weak, cracked, and crumbling”, where she sheds her superficial luxury dress and falls into a debased state of nakedness:

Quote :
"When she sees where she has fallen, she changes her countenance and her attire; she disrobes and undresses until she is wholly without clothing and appears to have nothing of value, being utterly lacking in material goods."

This impoverished creature who “goes to crouch in a whorehouse” (se vet au bordel cropir, v.6129) is Fortune undisguised, according to Reason, a lady stripped of vain ornaments that have no lasting value or profit. If Fortune appears to distribute riches and honor, dignities and authority, glory and worldly prosperity, she will inevitably cast her followers from their high estate into the mire, with their luxury dress, like Fortune’s own, finally in tatters (vv. 4823-66).

Either Fortune appears in a bejeweled and golden palace, lavishly clad in costly silks and brocades, or she plummets to the muddy depths of poverty, stark naked. The choices suggest a clear separation between courtly bodies and the garments that might cover them, drawing a discrete distinction between Fortune’s sartorial options. And yet this account of Lady Fortune as an icon for the fate of courtly lovers also provides a crucial option between the extremes of opulent clothing and unadorned skin. This alternative, which literary narratives of courtly love tend to cultivate and exploit, offers the oxymoronic image of a sartorial body: a body defined neither as clothed or naked, and one that also eludes conventional gender stereotypes.

When describing the rocky island on which Fortune’s house stands, Jean de Meun characterizes the site of this allegorical lady’s fluctuating movements as a water-washed rock constantly covered by pounding waves that it repeatedly sheds, as one would remove, the Old French suggests, an article of clothing:

Quote :
"(The waves strike it [the rock] and beat against it, assailing it repeatedly, many times hitting it so hard that they engulf it completely. Yet each time, it unclothes itself (redespuelle) from the water that has drenched it.)"

Although the term for rock (roche) is grammatically feminine in Old French and thus represented by the direct object pronoun “la,” the metaphorical body that this pronoun represents does not carry the stereotype of gendered femininity attached to Fortune’s excessively adorned self. This is not a naked female body clothed artificially with seductive feminine attire. Rather, the watery clothing of Fortune’s abode remains tellingly indistinct from what appears to be a more rocky and ungendered substrate. Indeed, the liquid garments that clothe this site cling and slide away without the discrete separation that more opaque and tangible material might supply. Most importantly, the metaphorical clothing of Fortune’s bedrock has a transformative effect, actually reshaping a body that it constitutes, composes, and recomposes:

Quote :
"(It [the rock] does not retain any one shape. Rather, it constantly changes and re-casts itself, taking on a new shape as it metamorphoses. Thus does it continually dress itself in a different and unexpected manner.)"

To be always “dressed in a different manner” means more, in this instance, than simply donning and removing varied garments as the allegorical Lady Fortune does. Here, the rock “always changes and recasts itself,” suggesting that this kind of aqueous clothing effects substantive alterations in the body being clothed. It is that transformative effect of lavish courtly attire, over and above its potential ability to deceive and disguise, that many courtly tales cultivate and that Reason finds especially objectionable. The house of Lady Fortune is to be avoided by courtly lovers, Reason states, not only because it is perilously undependable and fickle, casting the unwary visitor from the comfort of luxury clothes and adornment into the destitution of base nakedness. Fortune’s seductive power lies also in what Reason calls her “perverse” ability (v. 6135) to confuse the sartorial representations of social categories, impoverishing and dishonoring good people while rewarding the wicked with attributes heretofore belonging to the highly esteemed and richly endowed:

Quote :
"(She is so perverse that she throws good people into the mud, undresses and humiliates them, while raising up bad people and giving them dignities, honor, and power in great abundance.)"

The combined threat of love and luxury attire in the courtly world is thus not only to feed avarice but also to effect substantive change in social ranks and gendered subjectivities by eroding the hierarchical divisions that structure each of them.

When bourgeois women are denounced for effectively dressing up in noble garb and courtly men are accused of wearing the “prideful costume” of women, the lines ostensibly marking categories of class and gender are shown to be repeatedly challenged and remade through the transformative effects of clothing and ornament." [Courtly love Undressed]


Fortuna seduces, in-Fate-uates, Turns one a Fool, Frustrates, rips off in her ripples, disturbs, perturbs, Con-Volutes with her Volupt-uosity…

Fame carries ahead the Name, but also carries Away the name…

The de-clination from turbulence to turbidity; oblique slashes, gnashes, cuts, veers off, breaks away, gives a way.
From folly and forgetting to instantiating new beginnings, for-giving, gifting.
New stirrings stringing together…
Chain from PIE root *kat- "to twist, twine" is source also of Latin cassis "hunting net, snare"…

Constrain <> Chain

Depression <> Depreciation;

Safety <> Surety;
Monito-Ring Moment vs. Memento;
From keep to keepsake,
From Agri-culture to Civil-ization,
Hi-story and Blood-memory to wine-remembrance and en-joy-(N)-ment (forbid);
Totem and Taboo,
Hardware and soft-wear,
Gene to Meme,
Idylls and Ideals,
Time, i.e. Revolt[to "Over-Turn", overthrow] and Revolution [volvox, ulvam "womb, vulva"; Lithuanian valtis "twine, net," vilnis "wave," apvalus "round"].


Serres wrote:
"Invent liquid history and the ages of water." [The Birth of Physics]

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jul 13, 2016 11:56 am

Lucretius wrote:
Hymn to Venus

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"Creatress, mother of the Roman line,
Dear Venus, joy of earth and joy of heaven,
All things that live below that heraldry
Of star and planet, whose processional
Moves ever slow and solemn over us,
All things conceived, all things that face the light
In their bright visit, the grain-bearing fields,
The marinered oceans, where the wind and cloud
Are quiet in your presence – all proclaim
Your gift, without which they are nothingness.
For you that sweet artificer, the earth,
Submits her flowers, and for you the deep
Of ocean smiles, and the calm heaven shines
With shoreless light.

Ah, goddess, when the spring
Makes clear its daytime, and a warmer wind
Stirs from the west, a procreative air,
High in the sky the happy-hearted birds,
Responsive to your coming, call and cry,
The cattle, tame no longer, swim across
The rush of river-torrents, or skip and bound
In joyous meadows; where your brightness leads,
They follow, gladly taken in the drive,
The urge, of love to come. So, on you move
Over the seas and mountains, over streams
Whose ways are fierce, over the greening leas,
Over the leafy tenements of birds,
So moving that in all the ardor burns
For generation and their kind’s increase,

Since you alone control the way things are.
Since without you no thing has ever come
Into the radiant boundaries of light,
Since without you nothing is ever glad,
And nothing ever lovable, I need,
I need you with me, goddess, in the poem
I try to write here, on The Way Things Are." [Natura]



Another Translation:

Lucretius wrote:
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Hymn to Venus

"DELIGHT of Humane kind, and Gods above,
Parent of Rome; Propitious Queen of Love,
Whose vital pow’r, Air, Earth, and Sea supplies,
And breeds what e’r is born beneath the rowling Skies:
For every kind, by thy prolifique might,        5
Springs, and beholds the Regions of the light.
Thee, Goddess, thee the clouds and tempests fear,
And at thy pleasing presence disappear:
For thee the Land in fragrant Flow’rs is drest;
For thee the Ocean smiles, and smooths her wavy breast;        10
And Heav’n it self with more serene and purer light is blest.
For when the rising Spring adorns the Mead,
And a new Scene of Nature stands display’d,
When teeming Budds, and chearful greens appear,
And Western gales unlock the lazy year:        15
The joyous Birds thy welcome first express;
Whose native Songs thy genial fire confess;
Then salvage Beasts bound o’re their slighted food,
Strook with thy darts, and tempt the raging floud.
All Nature is thy Gift; Earth, Air, and Sea:        20
Of all that breaths, the various progeny,
Stung with delight, is goaded on by thee.
O’re barren Mountains, o’re the flowery Plain,
The leafy Forest, and the liquid Main
Extends thy uncontroul’d and boundless reign.        25
Through all the living Regions dost thou move,
And scatter’st, where thou goest, the kindly seeds of Love:
Since then the race of every living thing
Obeys thy pow’r; since nothing new can spring
Without thy warmth, without thy influence bear,        30
Or beautiful, or lovesome can appear;
Be thou my ayd; My tuneful Song inspire,
And kindle with thy own productive fire;
While all thy Province, Nature, I survey,
And sing to Memmius an immortal lay        35
Of Heav’n, and Earth, and every where thy wondrous power display:
To Memmius, under thy sweet influence born,
Whom thou with all thy gifts and graces dost adorn.
The rather then assist my Muse and me,
Infusing Verses worthy him and thee.        40
Mean time on Land and Sea let barb’rous discord cease,
And lull the listning world in universal peace
To thee Mankind their soft repose must owe;
For thou alone that blessing canst bestow;
Because the brutal business of the War        45
Is manag’d by thy dreadful Servant’s care;
Who oft retires from fighting fields, to prove
The pleasing pains of thy eternal Love:
And panting on thy breast supinely lies,
While with thy heavenly form he feeds his famish’d eyes;        50
Sucks in with open lips thy balmy breath,
By turns restor’d to life, and plung’d in pleasing death.
There while thy curling limbs about him move,
Involv’d and fetter’d in the links of Love,
When wishing all, he nothing can deny,        55
Thy Charms in that auspicious moment try;
With winning eloquence our peace implore,
And quiet to the weary World restore."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:15 pm

Michel Serres is a postmodern secularist and Epicurean humanist, but anyone who loves mathematics and mythology, physics and poetry, religion and history, politics and philosophy all con-centrated together, should not miss reading his brilliant book 'Hermes' - against enlightenment rationalism.
He does not teach anything we dont already know, but How he writes, is very 'illuminative'.

Some fantastic and superb writing, literally on 'Satanic Freedom'.


Part I

Michel Serres wrote:
"Lucretius's De Rerum Natura is a treatise on physics.

The hymn to Venus is a song to voluptuousness, to the original power, victorious-without having fought-over Mars and over the death in­ stinct, a song to the pleasure of life, to guilt-free knowledge. The knowl­ edge of the world is not guilty but peaceful and creative. It is generative and not destructive. But these words already drift toward morality-to­ ward deeply felt emotions, toward ataraxia and toward the gaze, the theatrical gesture: to see everything serenely, in quiet contemplation; to be at last free from the gods. As if Venus were not a god. As if De Rerum Natura did not begin in prayer. A believer, an atheist? It is a clear-cut decision: there is only transcendence. Let the figures on the mountain carouse endlessly. We shall come back later to these peaks which are untouched by marine waterspouts. Transcendence is all there is, and it must be allowed its own peculiarity. But it is a matter of immanence.

Venus sive'natura. Mavors sive natura. It is a question of physics and not of feelings, of nature and not of cruel hallucinations. Immanence: laws criss-cross the world, which is unreservedly the locus of reasons. But before poetry, one must choose between two laws : the law of Eros or the law of Thanatos; springtime or the plague; birds or cadavers; and the wounds of love or rotting arms and legs. Venus, verna, volucres, volnere amoris: these are the lines that I want. To choose, then, between two sorts of physics, and the first hymn is the axiom of this choice. Venus, that is to say, nature; or Mars, that is to say, nature. And the two remain true, violence and the plague plummeting down the steepest slope, falling, without recourse, according to law.

Western science has consistently not chosen Lucretius. And by that choice, it has opted for war and plagues, for brawls, blood, and bodies burnt at the stake. Western science, from Heraclitus to Hiroshima, has only known martial nature. What has been modestly called Lucretius's pessimism, seen in the drifting of h;s text from Aphrodite to the plague in Athens, is the recognition that he has lost his bet, and that his physics has been lost as well. Thus science, or what we call science, forbids us to read this lost science. The laws of Venus-Mother Nature cannot be deciphered by the children of Mars-these children who die and will continue to die at the stake before they ever understand that locally, within the walls of Athens for example, but also globally, at some indefinite time and place, the aforementioned decomposition brings back a large, teeming, atomic populace sliding down some thalweg, and thereby, by this declination, reconstitutes a world. The poem's text is nature itself, that of Venus. The text loops back upon itself at the end of the martial events, but not in a perfect circle. The spot in which the atoms fall is not necessarily plague­ ridden Athens; the time of the clinamen is not necessarily simultaneous with leaving the dead to bury the dead.

[The clinamen is an essential concept in Serres's interpretation of Lucretius's De Rerum Natura. It is "the minimum angle to the laminar flow [that] initiates a turbulence" (Serres, "Lucretius: Science and ReIigion"). The clinamen marks the moment when an atom in laminar flow deviates from its path, collides with another atom, and initiates the formation of things and ultimately of worlds. Serres argues against com­ mentators who maintain that the clinamen is a concept introduced arbitrarily by Lucretius to explain the beginning- of the world. On the contrary, physics has shown that any laminar flow sooner or later produces a pocket of turbulence which fundamentally alters the original flow. Thus Lucretius' treatise is in suprising' ways a true treatise on physics. See "Lucretius : Science and Religion". See also Michel Serres, La Naissance de laphvsique dans Ie texte de Lucrece: Fleut'es et turbulences (Paris: Minuit. 1977). - Ed.]

Space and time are thrown here and there. There is no circle. But, stochastically, turbulences appear in space and time. And the whole text creates turbulence. Everywhere. Venus, circumfusa, is diffused all around the reclining body of Mars, who has been thrown down to the nadir he had searched for. She bothers him and disturbs his law. The creative science of change and of circumstance is substituted for the physics of the fall, of repetition, and of rigorous trains of events. Neither a straight line nor a circle: a spiral (volute).

Return to the declination. The minimal angle to laminar flow initiates a turbulence. And from these pockets of turbulence here and there in in­ definite times and places, there is one world among many, that of things and of men.

Without the declination, there are only the laws of fate, that is to say, the chains of order. The new is born of the old; the new is only the repetition of the old. But the angle interrupts the stoic chain, breaks the foederafati, the endless series of causes and reasons. It disturbs, in fact, the laws of nature. And from it, the arrival of life, of everything that breathes; and the leaping of horses. The order of reasons is repetitive, and the train of thought that comes from it, infinitely iterative, is but a science of death. A science of dead things and a strategy of the kill. The order of reasons is martial. The world is in order, according to this mathematical physics in which the Stoics are met by Plato up the line and by Descartes further down, and where order reigns supreme over piles of cadavers. The laws are the same everywhere ; they are thanatocratic. There is nothing to be learned, to be discovered, to be invented, in this repetitive world, which falls in the parallel lines of identity. Nothing new under the SUIl of identity. It is information-free, complete redundance. The ch-ains of cause and effect, the fall of atoms, and the indefinite repetition of letters are the three necessary figures of science's nullity.

Determination, identity, repetition, informa­ tion-free, not a drop of knowledge : extermination, not even> the shadow of a life, death at the end of entropy. Then Mars rules the world, cutting up the bodies into atomized pieces, letting them fall. This is the foedus

fati, what physics understands as a law; things are that way. It is also the legal statute in the sense of dominant legislation: they wish things to be that way. Mars chose this sort of physics, the science of the fall and of silence. And here again is the plague. It is always the same sequence of events: an epidemic becomes pandemic in proportions, if not to say a pandemonium ; violence never stops, streaming the length of the !halweg ; the atoms fall endlessly; reasons repeat indefinitely. Buboes, weapons, miasmas, causes : it is always the same law, in which the effect repeats the cause in exactly the same way. Nothing is new under the sun of identity and nothing is kept under the same old sun. Nothing new and nothing born, there is no nature. There is death forever. Nature is put to death or it is not allowed to be born. And the science of all this is nothing, can be summed up as nothing. Stable, unchanging, redundant, it recopies the same writing in the same atoms-letters. The law is the plague; the reason is the fall; the repeated cause is death; the repetitive is redundance. And identity is death. Everything falls to zero, a complete lack of information, the nothingness of knowledge , non-existence . The Same is Non-Being.

The angle of inclination cures the plague, breaks the chain of violence, interrupts the reign of the same, invents the new reason and the new law, foedera naturae, gives birth to nature as it really is. The minimal angle of turbulence produces the first spirals here and there. It is literally revolu­ tion. Or it is the first evolution toward something else other than the same. Turbulence perturbs the chain, troubling the flow of the identical as Venus had troubled Mars.

The first vortices. Turbantibus aequora ventis: pockets of turbulence scattered in flowing fluid, be it air or salt water, breaking up the par­ allelism of its repetitive waves. The sweet vortices of the physics of Venus. How can your heart not rejoice as the flood waters abate (decliner) and the primordial waters begin to form, since in the same lofty position you escape from Mars and from his armies that are readied in perfect battle formation ? In these lofty heights that have· been strengthened by the wisdom of the sages, one must choose. between these two sorts of physics. The physics of the military troops in their rank and file forma­ tion of parallel lines, chains, and sequences. Here are the federated ones bound to fate, sheets of atoms bearing arms, exactly arranged, instructa, in a well-ordered fashion, in columns. This is the learned science of the teachers, the structure of divisions, the Heraclitean physics of war, rivalry, power, competition, which miserably repeats to death the blind shadows of its redundant law. Arrange yourselves in ranks; you will learn about order, about the structure of order, about the chain of reasons, the knowledge of ranks, of blood. Or else the physics of vortices, of sweetness, and of smiling voluptuousness. On the high seas, people work among these vortices: they are tossed about in the roll that, until recently, was called "turbination." They are perturbed. The uexan; however, is only cruel to a few landlubbers who have never been at sea. The sea-swept movement of intertwined lovers, or the voluptuous movements of the roll of the high seas. Listen to the line that swirls its spirals : suaue, uentis, uexari, uoluptas. It's the revolution of voluptuousness, the physics of Venus chosen over that of Mars.

A new return to declination. The difficulty of establishing or reading the theoretical text is added to the usual misinterpretations of translating it. Why, here and now, will (volonte) and voluptuousness (volupte)? Despite all their discussions, grammarians don't really know where to put the consonants: volu(n)tas, volu(p)tas. This doubt is a meaningful one. Once again, the demonstration begins. But from the beginning, we are fore­ warned. Maritime turbulence, looked at in bad weather from the shore, only stirs up fluids: winds and waters, turbantibus aequora ventis. And in the theoretical text, the reference to individual bodies again is only related to fluids : imbris uti guttae, like drops of rain, per aquas atque aera rarum, through the water or the rare medium of air; and again, corpus aquae naturaque tenuis aeris. It is certainly a question of weight, of gravity, but never of solids. It is the fall of heavy bodies, but not in the same sense that we have thought of these words as)f instinctively since the dawn of the classical era. And from this comes the increased probability of the proposed solution : the schema is a hydraulic one

In nature, living beings are born from flows. And these flows are laminar, their laminae parallel to one another; the declination is the tiniest angle necessary and sufficient to produce turbulence. From this comes the text that follows: what are thesefoederafati, these laws of fate that are broken by declination? The subsequent lines define them : they are sequences, where cause repeats cause ad infinitum. From this, the bundle, the sheaf, the infinite cylinder of parallel consequences. Trains of reason rain down in torrents. No longer, as in the model, are they atoms; they are neither concrete nor quasi-concrete, but laws or equations. The fall is the plan of their necessity. However, the declination inter­ rupts the model as well as the theory, perturbing them, introducing tur­ bulence. And since the model and theory are necessitarian, what can we call this declination except liberty? But beware: it is only a question of animantibus. Life has a degree of freedom relative to mechanical con­ straints. The Latin Libera remains concrete relative to weights, shackles, chains, and burdens. The laws of necessity, however, remain those of fall and equilibrium. And its follows, then, that life deviates from equi­ librium. How can this be explained materially? By visible and tangible phenomena that can be produced in experiments on flows; by analogy with the concrete model. Turbulence deviates from equilibrium. And the beginning of the vortex is the minimal angle of declination. The fact that life disturbs the order of the world means literally that at first, life is turbulence. What you see from the top of the cliff, in its sweetness, is the first-born being arising out of the waters, Aphrodite, who has just been born in the swirl of liquid spirals, Nature being born in smiling volup­ tuousness.

This is not contrary to the law, nor delirious, nor absurd, nor illogical. Nor is it as opposed as people have said to the teachings of Epicurus, which are strewn with vortices and turbulent clouds, as in the letter to Pythocles, or in one of the lost treatises which was in fact named "Of the Angle in the Atom."

The fact that the declination has been mocked, that it seemed to be a distortion or a strain on the system, a fiction, as Cicero says, and that we have remained blind to such a simple phenomenon is really quite normal, considering that we looked at it by using another paradigm.  

It is as difficult to become a phenome­ nologist again as it is to bre,ak the contracts of fate. Epicurus and Lucre­ tius change the paradigm. And Marx, who, while seeing subjectivity in the atom just as if it were a question of a Leibnizian monad, and seeing the arbiter in the clinamen as if he were rewriting the Theodicy, is doubly right to call Themistocles to mind.4 Athens is near destruction; let us leave the city and wage a sea battle.  

Since Democritus, the new knowledge is aware of infinitesimal questions. It gets inspiration from hydrodynamic models and turns its attention toward the formation of living systems. It is more physical, less mathe­ matical (since the probabilist organon is missing) than Platonic knowl­ edge, more phenomenological and less measured. But, most important, Athena is in the ocean. The chosen model is a fluid one. It is no longer a crystal, nor the five regular polyhedrons that are the solids of the Timaeus; it is flow. The nature of Mars, of martial physics, is one of hard, rigid, and rigorous bodies; the physics and nature of Venus are formed in flows. The residual hardness of the atom is beyond the threshold of perception; what counts in experiments and in phenomena is large numbers, the crowd of elements, the unmeasurable cataract, the river. And henceforth we are able to understand this, since our newly de­ veloping physics tells somewhat the same story too, by flows, random events, systems, disequilibria. We misunderstood Lucretius because we were the children of Plato and the Stoics, because the fundamental facts of Epicurean nature remained marginal in traditional science, which was really' not very Archimedean. From that point on, we ruled them out of the game in the history of science . Moreover, we put their nature outside nature, placing them in the soul and the subject. On the contrary, however, these facts are the foundation of materialism. Atoms are not souls; the soul itself is atomic.

All non-physical interpre­tations of the clinamen remain essentially idealist, as it were, or, more precisely, spiritualist, along the classic lines of philosophies of the mind, of ideologies of power and of military science. Classical science deserves classical philosophy. Find a good dictionary and verify for yourself that "classis" in Latin means "army."

But we have arrived at the contract-at the change Lucretius made in the contract. Why should the laws of nature or the necessity of fate be named foedus or foedera? Foedera naturae or foedera fati: pacts, alliances, conventions. Are we able to understand a political or strategic termino­logy, like the presence of the divine figures of Venus and Mars, in a treatise of objective science that is supposed to release us from the hold of the gods, and that is directed toward a type of wisdom in which political ambition and the dealings in the forum will no longer play a part? Our vocabulary is itself mired in just such an ambiguity: the order is of the world and of the street; the law is of the code and of the laboratory; the rule is operative and civil; the class is logical, social, and scholastic, etc.

Every war finally ends by a treaty of alliance, a foedus, unless it con­ tinues to the point of total annihilation or to the pandemonium of the plague. In the beginning of the fifth book, the struggle with nature is set out in the labors of Hercules, the first singular case of every war in general. Here the laborer and the soldier are one and the same. The field of Quirinus is occupied by Mars. The land of the producer is ravaged by the legionnaire, who disguises himself as a laborer. This theft, for it is a theft or an embezzlement, is part of a stubborn tradition. In the last century, Michelet always used Herakles as both model and god; he is the fighter who seems to be the worker-hero. In point of fact, the real pro­ducer has too much to do to exhaust his energies in non-productive aggression. Lucretius denounces unlawful occupation perpetrated, as usual, in the name of terror. Who today is afraid of the Nimean lion or of the Hydra of Lerna? If there are monsters here or there, go elsewhere, and that's the end to that. Once the battle is over, Hercules is useless - the­ atrical, in fact. Epicurus put down his weapons. He speaks, gives the laws, dictates the foedus. The new alliance with nature. With Epicurus, the Heraclitean period, in which war is the mother of all and in which physics remained in Ares's realm, comes to an end. Thus Lucretius criti­ cizes Heraclitus with severity but treats Empedocles with consideration: this other Sicilian had guessed the coming of the contract, in his intro­ duction of Friendship or Love. Faced with Hatred or Discord, a joyful Aphrodite had already arisen. Epicurus and Lucretius have put down their weapons and driven Mars out of physics. Can we understand that, outside of mythology and its old-fashioned naIvetes? Yes, and in spades." [Hermes]

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:17 pm

Part II


Michel Serres wrote:
"Bacon decreed that one cannot rule Nature except by obeying her. Descartes said that one has to become her master and possessor. The contractual alliance has been 'xoken and the battle starts again, with nature as the adversary; hydra, boar, or lion. Against nature, one plays without cheating; abiding by the laws of the hunt until checkmate. Epicurus has just failed, as well as the Aphrodite of Lucretius. It is the well-armed Syracusan who takes the lead. The method is no longer a contract but a strategy, a tactic and not a pact, a fight to death and not a coitus. Hercules returns in Bacon's work to go beyond the pillars of Hercules. And Archimedes, in Descartes's, moves the earth.6 And thus the figures of antiquity, such as Herakles, Mars, and Venus, are prosopopoeiae, since they can be reduced to principles and conditions.

In the establishment of objective knowledge, as in its historical be­ ginning, there is a set of decisions or preliminary choices that often remain unnoticed. Here is one of them: either there is a contractual agreement or there is a military strategy; either there is the foedus which calls an end to combat or there is the tactical game of command and mastery. Who leads science and who decides what it shall be ? The answer to the question, which appears to be mythological or religious, might be Mars or Venus, Hercules or Quirinus. Modern thinkers substitute other questions: what? o!' how? By contract or by strategy. Yet behind the abstract principles of method, our contemporaries rediscover the ques­ tion: who? and the language of antiquity; behind metaphysics, they dis­ cover thp- groups in power. Who? the producing class or the dominating class? And thus the military and its generals. Lucretius speaks of epony­ mous heroes; Descartes and Bacon speak in abstract principles, but these principles sparkle with metaphors; we speak as historians. The question, however, remains the same in all three languages, bearing on the very conditions of possibility of science. What can be said about nature : is she an enemy or a slave, an adversary or a partner in a contract that Lucretius would have made with Venus? The question is neither naive nor fri­ volous, but consequential. Will knowledge follow the downhill.slope of destruction, violence, and the plague or, inversely, that of peace and rejoicing? Life or death, that is the question. And there again, our knowl­ edge hears the voice of Lucretius.

It is a condition and a postulate. The content, norms, and results of science remain invariable in relation to these postu­ lates. The theorems and protocols are free in relation to these decisions. This is one of the weightiest problems that we have had to bear. It is difficult to think of a rigorous and exact science that might have been conditioned by Venus and not by Mars, for peace and not for destruc­ tion, by a contract and not by a strategy, by workers and not by generals, since Western science has always followed the weight of power. In other words: science is conditioned by postulates or by decisions that are generally social, cultural, or historical in nature, which form it and orient it; nevertheless, science is universal, and independent of the type of pre-established contract. Two and two make four; heavy bodies fall, according to the law of gravity; entropy increases in a closed system, re­ gardless of the latitude and whatever the ruling class. I cannot think of a mountain, a border, or a date which makes the agreement of scientists and everyone else relative on these points. Science is conditioned but unconditional. No one has ever escaped this dilemma.

It is, however, rather easy to distinguish the first conditions which give rise to what is conditioned while leaving the content of what is conditioned independent. They are said to be conditioning and not determining. These first conditions are, moreover, sufficient. A small room, a table and a chair, three notebooks, two pencils, and the average salary needed to make all these things possible, and, thus, the whole society, with its history and its divisions, all form a set of conditions for me to write a book. But this book can come to exist or not, and if so, it can be a collec­ tion of equations or of poems, copied or inventive, exact or erroneous, red-hot or warmed over. In short, in this case and a thousand like it, you can always proceedfrom the product to its conditions, but neverfrom the con­ ditions to the product. This rather simple principle has led some or all of contemporary philosophy into a process of retrospection. Even its lucid discourse is unflagging as long as it goes backward, with perfect hind­ sight, toward the multiple conditionings; but it is powerless once it has to go forward from the condition to the thing itself. And for that reason it occupies a position of non-productivity, not for any poverty inherent in the theory, but because of an interminable and indeterminable theory.

Science is always the same, but its topography changes depending on the initial contracts. It is always the same clay, but the shape changes. For all I know, one might make a sword or a ploughshare from the same piece of iron. The physics of Lucretius-I have just shown this through these models-is in fact the same as that of Archimedes, but the postulation of Venus and the exclusion of Mars transform it.7 Hydrostatics in the first is related to the constitution of living beings; in the latter, it is related to the theory of ship-building. Fluid mechanics can be a basis for biology or for a technology of the inert. The model does not vary; the relief changes.

the guiding, light in science is, more often than you think, the arrangement of the parts. Science has made the necessary arrangements, as it were. We forget all too often that exploitation is originally a spatial term, from "explicit," related in turn to "explicate": the network of folds (Plis) on a manifold. Classification, not only that of sciences, is always already there. It shows where to begin, where to go, the best route to take, and the region with the most interchanges. This is true for knowledge in general, for the encyclopedia: why put one disci­pline first, or in the middle; why start with a certain proposition or a certain experiment? What shapes a generation is less what it knows than the learning process that led it to this knowledge. Invention, discovery, rediscoveries, or what you will, all follow from a certain type of training. The pedagogue is a guide, the word itself says so; education is conducted by a duce, the word again attests to the fact; and the method is a path. And the global plan of this complex and the local connections of its graph are determined by a preliminary choice. Then the condition determines the outcome.

If knowledge is used for death and destruction, it is because Mars or the military, Bacon's commander, or Descartes's master and possessor stood guard in the heginning. This is true as well outside of science : there are few untrammeled spaces : the paths have already been blazed and the classifications posited. Well before forces come into contact with each other, well before confrontation is produced, finds its equi­ librium, or wavers, some nameless predecessor has chosen the battlefield and the firing lines that will decide the outcome. Strategy is not only a form of dynamics or energetics but first of all a topology. The presence of Mars or of Venus determines the shape of the realm of knowledge. Science has always been led by its flow charts.

Foedus is thus the pact after the war, the peace treaty. The two enemies had been locked in combat with one another, and now the armistice has been signed. Up to now, it has been a question of science, and we did not understand the part played by decision. Postulate and decision, products of culture. Still more? Foedus is generally a contract, a, social contract, for example. The social contract, however, can easily be rendered in the form of an armistice, once the all-but war is over. It is the plague and the end of the plague. The plague is a figure of violence in general, a multiple chain with an explosive power to propagate itself, and something which threatens a city or group with extermination : Athens, in Lucretius's work, or the realm of the Lion. From this comes the fable which tells how the judicial process was invented after a jackass had been killed as an emissary victim.s This violent communication, where the group's problems are at maximum-for its very existence comes into play here-stops with the use of force: the sacrifice of the one who will bear all the sins of the group. Justice is rendered, which means that justice appears, forming and formulating itself as an institution. And hence, the whole poem loops back upon itself without closing, just like a spiral. The plague at Athens has started: everyone whips himself bloody before the funeral pyres. The process only ends when all the fighters have died.

To check the crisis, to interrupt it, that is to say, to topple the body of Mars, forcing him to bend over backwards, there has to be a convention, a pact, a foedus, a judicial institution, or something like it. This contract can only be reached through a sacrificial murder. But whose? Mars can only be stopped at the altar of Iphianassa. The elite of Greek warriors stain the stone of the virgin Trivia with the blood of Iphigenia. This is the ordinary, trivial, and traditional solution, offered by every religion and every brand of politics. Iphigenia, that is to say, the genealogy of sovereign power. Lucretius makes it a point to give her name in Greek. She dies, and the ribbons of her untied headband dangle down, all the same; there is an abolition of differences. Her throat slit by her father's, sword, she is a virgin who had not yet bled; non-violent and innocent, she causes the agitation of the wind-swept high seas. For the storm, too, is the plague. There are two figures of violehce : flood and pandemonium. Murder increases along the chain, the two figures growing or escalating, as it were. Without the ritual killing of the virgin, the war would have  taken place among the Greek warriors themselves before they could ever have gotten to Troy. The waters are finally in movement and the miasmas reappear. Here then is the contract, the blood contract, a contract of the oldest tradition, maybe even a predestined one: the foederafati.

From that point on, what has to be stopped is the major threat, but its archaic safeguard as well. The plague, of course, and the storm, the fatal propagation of murder, but also -especially - the solution offered by the sacred to this collective problem: human sacrifice. Iphigenia must be saved.

The problem at hand con­ sists in stemming a series of murders without another assassination. For that solution is only temporary until a new crisis, a new squall, or a new epidemic erupts and the whole process is repeated. Nothing is new under the bloodied sun of history. The plague reappears in an Athens be­ strewn with cadavers. The scapegoats too must be saved by putting a stop to the series of sacrifices. From this comes the reversal: he who speaks and thereby gives rise to a new history does not place the sins of the world on the shoulders of another; of his own volition, he takes upon himself the thunderous roars of the heavens, the fire that has been set at the world's gates, the wrath of Jupiter. Spontaneously, he accepts the dangerous position that is determined by his knowledge of the laws of the universe and of human mechanisms. Faced with these horrible menaces, he goes forward unarmed. Epicurus, therefore, once again takes us away forever from the storms, putting us in a quiet spot away from the water.

To take on oneself alone the fires of the heavens and not to foist unleashed violence on the first passerby, the virgin Iphigenia, to go forward unarmed, straight ahead, lucidly deciphering what is happening, is to proceed in a fashion opposed to the world's religions and contrary to the terrifying constitution of the sacred. But this conduct can only be practiced if one knows the laws of constitution and if one is a master of justice. Epicurus is a god outside of all the gods, the new god of another history who has examined all the archaic traditions and turned against them. He abolishes the sacred by fulfilling it. The atheistic Epicureans were not wrong to venerate the founder of this science as a god. And through his courageous gesture, heroic above the call of heroism, Epicurus lets Venus be born above the troubled waters. That is to say, the foedus, love, and friendship; the contract of nature,foedera naturae. It is finally definitive, and the gods are no longer in the world, since an end to the ancient repetition of the sacrificial crisis has intervened, a cessation which is the basis of Epicurean wisdom.  

Freed, then, from this violence, henceforth independent of sacred space and time that no longer have any relation to us, with our feet firmly planted on high ground, protected from the sea, strengthened by the wisdom of the sages against the machinations of Mars, we are now able to let things come into being as objects, outside the mechanisms that regulate our deregulated violence. The sacred had formed a field of knowledge of the intersubjective and of polemical relationships. Nature thereby veiled itself in the dynamic laws of the group. Once the sar:red is placed outside of the world in faraway locations which are of no interest to us, Nature is born, objectively , bearir g her own laws. The solution founds science, the science of Venus without violence and without guilt, where thunder is no longer the anger of Zeus and where the level of the waters remains stable. In the new contract, the exact word can be spoken.

Might this be a general solution? Does science regularly appear in history in the wake of figures like Epicurus?

Foedus is the pact made after the war. The laws of nature, pronounced by the sciences, remain conditioned and then determined in their global arrangement by such a preliminary contract: the choice between Venus and Mars, for example. Foedus is, moreover, the convention that puts an end to all-out war. During a first period of history, exterminating violence freezes, coagulates, stops during the sacrificial murder: Iphigenia. But a new crisis makes it start up again, and the plague begins anew. One must start over. The sacred is formed by this catastrophic and repetitive dynamic. The hero Epicurus willingly takes the place of the virgin; unarmed, he disarms the process, gives rise to a new history, an objective science. One is finally able to see how Venus replaces Mars. Foedus is, once and for all, a political constitution.

Henceforth, what does the foedus mean?

One must get back to things themselves. Almost at the beginning of the first book, Lucretius distinguishes the coniuncta from the euenta, according to a standard division of Epicurean physics. What is conjoined to a body is that which is destroyed if this thing is separated from it. Thus it is the conjunction as such. The examples given clarify the definition. What is conjoined to the stone is weight; to fire, heat; to water, liquidity. Thus, all bodies are tangible and the void is not tangible. It is a question of what Leibniz in the seventeenth century would have called a well-founded phenomenon, whose internal relations and specific external relations are stable.

Atoms are organized here in well­ established phenomena. Their reunion is a convention, a coition, coitus, and a conjunction, coniuncta. Without this conjugation or meeting, the gatherings become undone and the phenomena have no basis; physics, in its three fields, disappears. Physics remains the fundamental theory of the void and of atoms, as if it were the science before the birth of things, but it is destroyed as the science of nature. Bodies are made of atoms and void, and the study of bodies consists in finding out how they are made. Their substance is particular to them and their nature is relational. The essential thing, then, for an exact discourse de rerum natura is relation or interrelation-the simplex, as combinatory topology says; bonds, as chemistry says; interaction, as modern physics says. This set of relations without which nothing can come into being or exist is made up-from the factual point of view-of coniuncta, which are the stable networks of composition. And in theory, it is enunciated by the Foedus.

In a certain sense, the proto-model of fundamental physics has no laws. Given an infinite void in which atomic clouds move about, a space in which sets and groups move, as soon as a phenomenon appears or a body is formed a law can be stated. The laws of nature come from conjugation ; there is no nature but that of compounds. In the same way, there are the laws of putting together letters-atoms to produce a text. The alphabetical proto­ cloud is without law and the letters are scattered at random, always there as a set in space, as language; but as soon as a text or speech appears, the laws of good formulation, combination, and conjugation also appear. These laws, however, are only federation. The law repeats the fact itself: while things are in the process of being formed, the laws enunciate the federated. A thing or a state of things, like fluid mechanics and the theories of equilibrium and heat, can take these laws into account, and are conjugated de facto and federated de jure.

The foedera naturae, the laws of nature, are the foedera coniunctorum, the laws of conjugation, but they are only possible by dint of this conjugation: con­ iuncta foederum, the composition of the laws. There is no distance from the fact to the laws; the space between things and languages is reduced to zero. In both cases-but there is really only one case-every formation is a linking; everything is only relation. Aside from relation, there are only clouds in the void, be they made of letters or of atoms. Language is born with the birth of things and by the very same process. Things appear as the bearers of their own language. Coniuncta and foedera are the same word : stable gatherings of elements, of whatever sort.

Venus states the foedus, the contract, as an ego coniungo vos. Venus assembles the atoms, like the compounds. She is not transcendent like the other gods, but immanent in this world, the being of relation. She is identical to the relation. Venus sive natura sive coniuncta sive foedera. She inspires inclina­ tion; she is inclination. Declination is also a differential of voluptuous­ ness, the first trouble before a linking. Only Aphrodite governs: who was ever able to govern without the angle of the rudder (gouvemail)? Look at lightning in Heraclitus's work: it is said to be the governor of all things. But how could that be without the inclination of the rudder blade or the inclined zig-zag with which it marks the sky? It is the furrow of the world, inscribed and traced in the clouds, the mark of the rudder solicited in an oblique fashion, the seal struck by the government, by its one and only law. Here again: nature is formed by linkings; these relations, criss­ crossing in a network, necessarily begin with a differential angle. And Venus inclining is the declination itself.

Here is the complement of the model. Given a flow of atoms, by the declination, the first tangent to the given curve, and afterward, by the vortex, a relatively stable thing is constituted. It stays in disequilibrium, ready to break, then to die and disappear but nonetheless resistant by its established conjunctions, between the torrential flow from the upstream currents and the river flowing downstream to the sea. It is a stationary turbulence. At the heart of this nucleus, the coniuncta crystallize in a network. The thing thereby has weight and, as a liquid, it heats up. Physics studies these stabilities. All around these volutes, which together are the very nature of things, the unending flow continues to shower atoms. They occur, finding these voluminous knots here and there, conjugate vaguely with the profiles of the objects, and then quickly move toward the exit, disheveled and undone, resuming their parallel path. Barely a disturbance or ripple on the water's surface. Without objects of matter and space, without quasi-stationary formations, this movement would not be thus, nor would it be perceived. It is a poorly grounded phenomenon, totally bereft of conjunctions. It occurs, crosses, expires, or disperses: it is an event.

The clock that Lucretius placed right in the middle of nature cannot mark Newtonian time; as the clock is the totality of things, between their birth and death, it marks a Bergsonian, that is, thermodynamic, time-an irreversible and irrevocable time, marked like the endless flow of atoms, flowing, running, crumbling (coulant, courant, croulant) toward their downfall and death. Things have weight: they fall, seeking their peaceful rest. Fluid, they flow; hot, they cool off. Downfall, death, dispersal : breaks, dichotomies, atoms. Atomic flow is residual: the background of being, white noise. This world set adrift never to return is bestrewn, here and there, at indefinite times and in indefinite places, with pockets, where vortices are born in pseudo­ returns. Clocks appear with these objects, spiraling, shifting clocks which from their moment of birth begin to mark the time of death. The Lu­ cretian world is globally entropic, but negatively entropic in certain swirling pockets. Conjunction is negative entropy; the complex thus formed counts the quantity of information set adrift. The event which barely occurs and almost immediately disintegrates minimally resists the irreversible flow, carrying little information. Newtonian time, which is reversible, marks resistance to the irrevocable. It is absent from this sort of physics, and that is why our forefathers were unable to imagine that Lucretian physics ever existed, with the possible exception of Bergson, who thrived on it. Irreversible time is the master here: the physics of things resists it in spots, but in the flow of the drift; history follows, producing barely a ripple in the flow. History flows around physics.

Hence Lucretius's examples. In the same way that conjunctions were heavy, liquid, and hot, and thereby produced the classifications of physics, events are all of a sociopolitical order. Slavery and freedom are placed on either side of the couple poverty-wealth, as if the central pair were the nucleus of the surrounding pair. The condition of the slave and that of the free man are placed alongside material and spatial objects: a dearth of bread, a wealth of money. Symptomata, says Epicurus, of events; sym­ bebekota, he says, of conjunctions. Slavery and freedom are symptoms of wealth and poverty, themselves symptoms of better-connected material things. History is a symptom of nature. Time is the symptom 9f symp­ toms. Let us take the war now, be it the current one or the Trojan War. Mars is only an accident of stable Venus, a temporary relief outside the assembled convention. Mars passes by, badly connected. Vulcan would have to capture him in his net, as Homer says, meaning a penis captivus. Otherwise, Mars is only in transit, passing through. Final example, agree­ ment. Here is thefoedus, the politicalfoedus, pronounced after the war, and following every war. Far from projecting the constitution of political order on the state of things, unconsciously, as they say, Lucretius dis­ tinguishes very clearly the conjunctival, contractual, stable links among atoms themselves from the circumstantial and unstable historical contract which would be nothing without the existence of the former and which quickly disappears around them. Politics and history are only the phe­nomenal symptoms of the basic, fundamental combination.

Lucretius translates syrnptomata by euenta. Once again the Greek word has to do with falling. Things fall and meet each other along the way. There are bodies, be they solid, liquid, living, or whatever. Atoms are a basic example: collision and chance. Cournot says exactly the same thing when he talks about the intersection of independent series. [The nineteenth-century mathematician, economist, and philosopher, Antoine Cournot, argued that there are two sorts of causal chains: interdependent ones and independent ones. The intersection of independent causal chains gives rise to chance occurrences. See Antoine Coumot, An Essay on the Foundations of Our Knowledge - Ed.]

Thus the small amount of linkage between events, as if the encounter produced no, or few, relations. Venus is absent from history and politics. Lucretius adopts, instead of this con-, a prefix of emission. This is very important, for it is at the exit that we see that it was only a question of politics and history; nothing remains but ruins, and the scattered pieces are once again in parallel free fall, while the world con­ tinues to turn in a more or less stable way. The symptom was a phantom.

The peace of the Garden , its tranquil serenity, is called "ataraxia." But the soul is formed of atoms, like the body, like the world. Ataraxia, a moral state, is thus a physical state, one without divergence or distance. But the latter model shows in infinite space a chance multiplicity of vortices of which one of the sets is nature, this nature, and of which the set of all the sets is the plurality of worlds. For Lucretius, and for us as well, the universe is the global vortex of local vortices. And so it goes in his poem. Ataraxia is the absence of trouble. Nature is rivers and whirl­ winds. The life of the wise man is free from turbulence, yet his life is the closest to nature. In the name of Epicureans, Seneca gives this bit of advice: ad legem naturae revertamur. Return to the natural law, to the foedus. Revertamur, morals and vortex again.

What nature teaches us is the streaming of the endless flow, the atomic cascade and its turbulences-waterspouts and whirlwinds, the celestial wheel endlessly spinning, the conic spiral that generates things. The soul, like the body, like bodies, is made up of hot atoms, airborne and windswept, unnamed; that is to say, it is made up of the principles of heat, of fluidity in general, and of weight; it is the seat of turbulences. It burns, it is disturbed, it loses its balance, like the sea, like a volcano, like thunder. The same space and the same substance produce the same phe­ nomena according to the same laws. Disturbances that we give names to out of our fear of the gods, or of the anguish of death. The soul is tied in knots, just like the world. And like the world, it is unstable, in a state of disequilibrium.

Physics and psychology account for these scattered knots where dis­ turbances occur. Within the three physical disciplines, the fundamental theory is connected to atomic laminar flow, the void, and basic principles. Within cultural psychology, marked with anguish and anxiety by the gods and by history, burdened with the relative and adventitious events of strife and combat, morals are linked to a primary state of things. Ataraxia returns to the initial turbulences before there was a disturbance in the straight line of the flow. The wise man is the basic world. He re­ discovers material being, the base of being itself, where no ripple has yet troubled the surface of the waters.

Once more, we have to mark irreversible time on the clocks. It ticks away, irreversibly, marking degradation. The things that were formed in the hollows of the vortices lose their atoms little by little in the down­ stream flow. It is the time of wear and tear, the statues of the gods worn out by the kisses of the faithful. The world is mortal. This is thermo­ dynamic time: time of heat, weight, and flow, the disciplines of the trivium. It is the drift toward the plague and toward dissolution. We call this the second principle of thermpdynamics, known to the Greeks at least since Heraclitus. 'History, or the idea of history, is only the trans­ lation or transposition of this material principle. It is not only the copy or reproduction of a mythical paradise lost. If, from the beginning until today, the earth has become tired and no longer creates any new species, if men are less solid and more fragile, it is because the devouring down­ stream flow has stolen a share of their atoms. More and more, they are the hollow men, offered up to the erosion of irreversible time. Atomist physicists take up an old tradition, but they place it in the realm of the demonstrable and experimentally provable. From this point on, history has two components: irrevocable wear and tear and the human labor which tends to compensate for erosion. The farmer adapts to the aging of the earth : through his labor, he wrests from the earth what it used to give freely. Progressive civilization is merely a response to the wear and tear of time. Civilization goes upstream in the entropic river. Hence labor, of course, but also language and writing. Culture and agriculture have always been on the same vector.

Given all that, the physics of the Atomists also has an equivalent of what we call the first principle. The universe is regulated on a constancy, an isonomia. We are not yet at the invariability of forces or energy, but everything occurs as if this were the case. To the degradation of one thing corresponds the birth of another somewhere else ; to the death of a world from plagues and funeral pyres, the appearance somewhere, any­ where, of a new world. The thesis of the plurality of existing worlds is thereby made necessary. The struggling, dying world gives up its atoms in a cataract to the basic flow; it is·untied and undone analytically; elsewhere, in an indefinite place and time, a declination is the herald of a new vortex. It is therefore necessary to have a multiplicity in infinite space for a constancy to be established in the field of eroded disap­ pearance, of irreversibility, and of chance. Invariability is global. Physics presents a system, but not a hierarchical, deductive, or closely woven one like that in the series of the Stoics; it is a physics of set theory whose general equilibrium is a balance sheet that takes the stochastic into ac­ count. Locally, this meta-stability is seen for the time being on the threshvld marked by the rising of the waters; the theory announces it by unchangeable laws; praxis ensures it by the success of the provisions. Here again is afoedus: the pact is constancy and the contract, insurance. Lucretius goes still further, and, without a doubt, more deeply, into the matter.

He guarantees the stability of the flow itself in its movement and direction, so it attains homeorrhesis. Whatever the changing combinations of atoms, whatever the obstacles in front of them, be they monsters or androgynes, the aleatory vortices end up by producing a coherent, well­ founded (that is to say, conjoined) world. Further on, the conjunction is undone in the streaming of mortality. Still further on, in that which is foreseeable globally but unforeseeable locally, the declination reappears. The clinamen is a principal element of homeorrhesis, assuring the stability of the chreodes, being a differential of a chreode. In order to be no longer only static, in order for the system to be no longer only a statue, in order for stability itself to attain movement, what else is necessary at the beginning besides an inclination? I am not saying that it is sufficient, but necessary. The river must have a fall line for it to remain stable in its variable bed. Declination is a powerful discovery of physics and me­ chanics. It breaks with the common antithesis of rest and movement of

Parmenides and Heraclitus, much better than Plato had done it. In evidence and in simplicity, in that which can be touched and tested. With the declination, what is stable is movement along the path of its flow, both in its general direction and in its point-by-point passage. It is declination which ensures the deepest and most exact invariability, although tradition, up to modern times, has only seen it as paradoxes. For it is the condition of a great synthesis between static and dynamic. Hence, the following recapitulation: the old unitary Being is multiplicity; there are atoms. The stable Being at rest is movement: atomic flow, streaming, cascades. The global fluidity of local solids. Here is irreversible time. The tiniest possible angle, the angle of contingence, marks a direction, which needs no other referent than the intrinsic one of the flow: and we have a thalweg. A stability is recognized, exists, is thinkable and tangible in and through fluvial flow; it is homeorrhesis. Through conjunction a reunification is possible. The physics of things has made the round of ancient physics, leaving the head gods atop their mountain. In the same way that the analysis of being produced atoms, the analysis of vectorial directions of space produces the clinamen. Movement and rest are joined in turbulence , constancy and variation, life and death. There was perhaps nothing in all of Antiquity more accurately seen and stated.

Everything is abraded by irreversible atomic erosion. The increasing work of humanity seeks to check this irrevocable movement. It is progress; it is not progress: history advances on the surface but backs up below, climbing back up a flow which goes down more quickly than it can advance. Catching up is forestalled; the plague will return. The euenta slide over the coniuncta; history skids over matter. The first global vortex. Humanity builds weak cohesions on top of material centers with strong cohesion in the process of coming undone. Athens, preeminent city of culture, grapes and figs, discourse and science, has to end, despite all this work, in a scattered pile of atomized bodies. The ashes of the funeral pyres are given over to the cataract. The irrevocable fate of laborious transformations. This history is doomed from the beginning. Hence, one should expect nothing from struggles, competition, agitation, activity, or growth, for they are all just a little brownian motion on the surface, superficial disturbances hiding the incurable erosion of matter, of things, and of the world.

Everything is constant, but in the aleatory and the directional. Venus watches over rebirth, a whim of her springtime desire : the first occurrence of meetings and of collisions. Here and there, yesterday and tomorrow, for the perpetuation of the species. Athens is lost; this city is erased from history; that universe is crumbling; a turbulence starts again, twinkling somewhere in the infinite void, formed in the wink of an eye or clinker­ built. It is born with its own time; elsewhere there are smoking ruins: Troy. The second global vortex, but exploded globally. The dead and the constitutions are distributed and dispersed in a spatiotemporal in­ finity.

Thus, the wise man comes back to natural pacts, beginning at the beginning. Well versed in the temporality of degradation, he knows that the vortices will come undone. Not only the pointless agitation of turbu­ lent men, simple ripples on the water's surface, but also-and especially - things and the world produced from turbulence . All these disturbances return to the original streaming. Born of dust, to dust they return. And it is the same with the soul, my soul, a thing among things. Not only here and now, troubled with anguish and anxiety, with fear and suffering, but born some night from a chance occurrence, a meeting, a collision, an inclination, a disturbance. This morning my soul is tumultuous, con­ vulsive, and tempestuous, but from its birth and in its very being, it is only a troublemaker, a product of a storm in the atomic cloud, of an oblique lightning bolt. It is a taraxia, just like my body, and like things themselves. I know it; the laws of physics tell me so. And I make my revolution. The physics of the vortex is revolutionary. It goes back to the first disturbance, toward the original clinamen. And from there to the streaming, .to the constancies of movements, to general invariabilities, whatever the random variations, to the primordial paths of matter itself, pricked here and there, marked with convulsions. Thus, ataraxia is a physical state, the fundamental state of matter; on this base, worlds are formed, disturbed by circumstances. Morality is physics. Wisdom com­ pletes its revolution, going back up the helix toward this first state of things; ataraxia is the absence of vortices. The soul of the wise man is extended to the global universe. The wise man is the universe. He is, when pacified, the pact itself.

Greek wisdom reaches one of its most important points here, where man is in the world and of the world, in matter and of matter. He is not a stranger in the world but a friend, at home in the world, a fellow voyager, an equal. He has a contract of Venus with things. Many other wisdoms and many other sciences are founded, antithetically, on breaking this contract. Man is a stranger in the world, alienated from the dawn, from the sky, from things. He hates them and fights against them. His environ­ ment is a dangerous enemy who must be fought and who must be kept in servitude. Martial neuroses from Plato to Descartes, from Bacon to us. The hatred of objects at the root of knowledge, the horror of the world at the heart of the theoretical. The universe of Ericurus and Lucretius is a reconciled one in which the science of things and the science of man go hand in hand, in identity. I am a disturbance, a vortex in turbulent nature. I am an ataraxia in a universe in which the heart of being is undisturbed. The wrinkles on my brow are the same as the ripples on the water. And my appeasement is universal.

The crisis temporarily subsides after a sacrificial murder. Iphigenia is put to death, the wind rises up, the Trojan War will take place, a new crisis of violence. Here the war takes place in Athens, atrocious brawls among the funeral pyres. The plague, like the unleashed ocean, like the swelling waters of the river, is a figure of violence. In the sixth book, there is no sacrifice to interrupt the new crisis. No Iphigenia in a plague­ ridden Athens, the priest has fled. Instead of one unimportant funeral pyre, there are a hundred, all afire, one at each crossroads. Have we gained anything in the exchange? In other words, if you suppress vi­ olence, it reappears. Remove its local setting, that is to say, the solution of religious sacrifice, and immediately the global space of the city is plague-ridden with violence. An important question which Lucretius did not avoid, and which perhaps he could not answer and which pushed him to his limits.

Violence is the only problem so poorly resolved that our own culture is, without a doubt, the continuation, through other means, of barbarian­ Ism .

Violence is a major component of the relations among men. It is there, running free, perhaps fatal for us; maybe it is our destiny and our greatest risk, our greatest disequilibrium. Lucretius is well aware of sacrificial purging, and, recognizing the sacrificial solution, sets it aside. He is also aware of the legal solution, which is merely the interpretation of the previous solution by the rationalization of the guilty parties.

The most revolutionary event in the history of mankind and, perhaps, in the evolution of hominids in general was less, it seems to me, the attainment of abstracts orgeneralities in and through language than it was a turningawayfrom the set ofrelations that we have within thefamily, the group, and so on, and that (mly concern us and them, toward an agreement, maybe a confused one, but a sudden and speetfic one, about something exterior to this set. Before this event, there was only the network of relations in which we had been plunged without any other resort. And suddenly, a thing, something, appears outside the network. The messages exchanged no longer say: I, you, he, we, they, and so on, but this, here. Ecce. Here is the thing itself.

As far as we know, the animals that are the most closely related to us, namely, the mammals, communicate among themselves by repeating in a stereotyped fashion the network of their relations. The animal signals or makes known to another animal : I dominate you and I give to you, I am dominated by you, therefore I receive from you. What? That is not important or it is implied within the relation. You are large and strong, I beg from you. Lucretius speaks in this manner of our relation to the gods. Hence, the necessitating condition that forces animals to regulate the set of problems born of these relations within the network itself. There are only contracts, and such is their fate.

The human message, however, even if it often repeats the network of relations among men until it becomes a stereotype, in addition sometimes says something about the thing. If it does not, the message is immediately brought back to the schemas of the political animal, in other words, to the animal alone. Humanization consists of the following message: here is some bread, whoever I am, whoever you are. Hoc est, that is, in the neuter. Neuter for the gender, neutral for war. Paradoxically, there are men or human groups only after the appearance of the object as such. The object as an object, more or less independent from us and more or less invariable in the variation of our relations, separates man from mammals. The political animal, the one who subordinates every object to relations among subjects, is only a mammal among others, a wolf, for example, a wolfamongwolves.Inpurepolitics, thedictumofHobbes, thatmanisawolfto other men, is not a metaphor but the exact index of a regression to the state which precedes the emergence of the object.

The origin of the theater, comedy and tragedy, where it is only a question of human relations and where there IS never an object as such, is as old as the origin of political relations: it is submerged in animality. Politics and theater are merely mammalian.

The discovery of the object as such and, in a global fashion, of the ex­ terior world , if it is not yet the first scientific invention, remains the pre­ liminary condition to any sort of investigation of this type. Moreover, it makes an opening and something like a chance to escape from the network of our relations, and, therefore, to free us from the problems posed by this network, in particular, the problem of violence. What pertains to the object will perhaps be neutral terrain. The prehistory of physics, and of non-violence, given at the same time. The prehistory of hominids. Is an object conceivable outside of relations of force?
Listen now to the lessons of Epicureanism, which boil down to the

following: reduce to a minimum the network of relations in which you are submerged. Live in the garden, a small space, with a few friends. No family, if it is possible, and, in any case, no politics. But especially this. Here is the object, objects, the world, nature, physics. Aphrodite-pleasure is born of the world and the waters. Mars is in the forum and in the armed crowd. Reduce your relations to a minimum and bring your objects to the fore; reduce the intersubjective to a minimum and the objective to a maximum. With your back turned on politics, study physics. Peace through neutrality. Such knowledge brings happiness, or at least the end of our worst pains. Forget the sacred; that means: forget the violence which founds it and forget the religious which links men to each other. Consider the object, objects, nature.

Nevertheless, the plague returns, destroying Athens and bringing vio­ lence and death. Why? Let us return to the object. There are only two objects that constitute everything: atoms and the void. The void, inane, has its root in the Greek verb inein, which means to purge, to expel, or, in the passive, to be chased by a purge . The void is a part of chaos but is also a catharsis. Iphigenia is sacrificed, a purge or catharsis for the petty kings in Greece, but at the end of the sacred dynamics there is the Trojan War and extermination. A passage to the object to be freed from Mars. But the first object is the purge; it is only the physical concept of catharsis. The second object, the atom. The sacred solution begins with a division and separation of space. The temple is a dichotomized spare; the word itself tells us so. Inside is the religious, outside is the profane. A two-valued logic, a two-valued geometry, a two-valued ontology, inside, outside; sacred,profane;matter,void. The word temple is of the same family as atom. The atom is the last or the first temple, and the void is the last or the first purge. The two objects are, in the balance, the physical concepts of catharsis and temple. We return to the network of relations. For having erased the sacrifice of Iphigenia in the temple of Trivia, the local religious event inundates the globe. Atoms in the void, little temples in the great purge. Nature is still another sacrificial substitute. Violence is still-and always-in physics. Thus the atoms-germs sack Athens and the last survivors kill each other. Q.E.D. It is not politics or sociology that is projected on nature, but the sacred. Beneath the sacred, there is violence. Beneath the object, relations reappear.

The question, for us, stays the same: violence is not.only in the use of science but still hides in the unknown of its concepts. Athens generalized, the world after Hiroshima, can still die from the atoms. Where lies the madness of the irrational in our rational?

Today we are discovering the limits of laws, the limits of the realm in which nature can be controlled, that is to say, in which it is indifferent. We are rediscovering this truth, announced a long time ago by Serres and on which Lucrece is a meditation: "Nature does not code the uni­ versal. . . . there is no code at the equilibrium point."30 Everything that exists, all the individual bodies that come into being, coded circumstances, tablets of their own law, do so by distancing themselves from the law without a memory, the law of the dynamic "fall," the stable and infinite interlinking, or the law of evolution toward thermodynamic equilibrium, the forgetting of the specificity of initial states.

A scientific style does not die if the limits of the questions it implies or the specificity of the questions it brings to the fore are uncovered. It remains the witness to a successful dialogue with nature. Serres's work helps us understand that our questions no longer can be asked of a world without friction or holes - the world of Leibniz. After all, our physics was never capable of truly understanding the Leibnizian harmony of the thousands of voices translating each other in a universal code." [Hermes]

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:25 pm

Lyssa wrote:
Concepts, notions, falsifications, helping things thrive with no reference to reality - the disconnect from the phenomenal world has become so entrenched, there is nothing but simulation left. A dysgenics of pure simulacra. Things like honor and truth - pure simulation… the goddess has departed.

Do you not see?

What concerns me most is that I do not see, because I may have no reference to genuine reality. Only an illusion. (This extends beyond the context of this conversation.)

"To an artificial mind all reality is virtual." (The Animatrix)

"What's real doesn't matter. What's important is how we live our lives." (The Animarix)

Black Panther wrote:
I consider most humans to only partially exist.
In as far as one lets oneself be commanded how to act and prescribed what to value, one is not an entity. Most humans wouldnt know what it is to be an entity; one must be of strong birth to renounce the prescriptions.

A man can still walk the treadmill and forsake its truth in his own time, then he is struggling as a form of strength. And yet he does not escape the sickness.

Only when a man sets his own terms and is able to live by them, is he strong, free, virtuous, worthy of being. Such self-set terms are more often than not cultural choices; for example, the Roman man of culture, to whom being banished would be a fate worse than death. The only solution for such a man would be to conquer the city, merely for the right to inhabit it.

Yet we are bound to live by the terms of the gods' will, in a manner of speaking. We are a product of nature, therefore bound to its inherent limitations... whatever they are. Or, is there a pragmatic limit on what terms a man sets for himself, and those terms he is forced to live by at any given time?

What of the person who runs the treadmill in order to master it, while keenly being aware of the alternative? Or what of those who accomplish more while on the treadmill than the supposed strong men who discount it? Does it not depend on which is valued more? The results, or the method?
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sun Aug 07, 2016 3:05 am

Acryptical wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
Concepts, notions, falsifications, helping things thrive with no reference to reality - the disconnect from the phenomenal world has become so entrenched, there is nothing but simulation left. A dysgenics of pure simulacra. Things like honor and truth - pure simulation… the goddess has departed.

Do you not see?

What concerns me most is that I do not see, because I may have no reference to genuine reality. Only an illusion. (This extends beyond the context of this conversation.)

"To an artificial mind all reality is virtual." (The Animatrix)

"What's real doesn't matter. What's important is how we live our lives." (The Animarix)



Did The Force send you here, young Jedi? Wink

The need for an impossible absolute certainty is already a dis/ease. And finding no safe crutch, conserves energy by relapsing into pain/pleasure as the simplistic means of surviving day to day.
This kind of self-retardation into hedonism is existing, not living.

So, how do you live your life when you are indifferent about what is real or unreal, that, in the real unprotected world could spell death or worse, for you?

Some news:

Satyr wrote:
"What must be defined here is nature, versus human environments.

One must adapt to nature, or die.
Nature is dynamic.

Man imposes an order forcing other men to adapt.

Different adaptive strategies and motives.
One is an admission of humility before what makes him possible - no resentiment - the other is an admission of weakness in relation to other men; a humility before men."


The eugenic molding of the individual's mind has already taken place before it has reached the age of maturity.
Education, training, peer pressures, pop culture, institutionalization, regimentation, Pavlovian methods of manipulating spontaneous reactions, have all shaped the individual's mind before it can even begin to think on its own.
It never does.
The adaptive process for such an individual, is about applying what it has been given as indubitable truths and principles, measuring its own performance in accordance to the values standards it has adopted as the only sane ones.

It no longer needs to adapt, because the world, as it can perceive it (the artificial world of man) is adjusting itself, in relation to the world outside, and telling this mind what to do and how to act, to facilitate this process.
The individual begins to believe that the world rotates around its needs, because the way to satisfy them is given, it is a given.

This decrease in stress/anxiety (fear), is accompanied by a steady stream of it. The mind exists in a perpetual state of stress that never rises to anxiety - except in some cases, for various reasons, and quickly medicated and intervened upon - and rarely to fear.
Fear becomes the dirty word, only the system can impose upon the mind.
Nobody is permitted to live in fear of another man...all fear is the monopoly of the system.
Disrespect for man...because respect is founded on anxiety/fear, and all that respect channeled to the institution, with specific individuals, chosen for the task, becoming representations of it - power through proxy.

The steady rate of anxiety/fear has two utilities:

1- It maintains a steady state of activity, work, labor, so that atrophy does not occur in the areas deemed important to the institution's health.

2- It reduces the tolerance levels (strength) of the psyche's habituate to this steady state, but inexperienced with any state above it.
This makes any slight increase in anxiety/fear all the more effective.


Values are dependent on standards.
The environment determines the standards.
Changing environments can result in changing standards.

The most vacillating brain is the Modern brain:
Shallow, weak-willed, cowardly... adapting to any slight change, altering its values with the slightest discomfort.
It is, in fact, proud of its own malleability... and considers itself open-minded, enlightened, progressive, because of it.
It's weak-will, superficial awareness, stupidity, retarded psychology, feminine disposition, is twisted into a positive attribute, simply by changing the words, and the reasons.... in true nihilistic form.

As need/suffering decreases the quality of the values decreases proportionally.

No experience with need/suffering, means no contact with the organism's own essence, as a non-absolute, striving towards an object/objective.
It constitutes a partial, never completed, detachment form existence - a form of numbness which imitates indifference by never having to go through the prerequisite stages of empowerment and adaptation.
The brain is thrust into a fabricated, externally guaranteed, state of immediate gratification...and there it wallows like a pig in the mud. It's sensation of independence, from its past, from nature, is an artificially produced form of dependence. It never attains it, or any level of it, because it has a "right" to it...for an undisclosed price.

The brain, finding itself in a sheltering, ordered, protective, system, not of its own doing, becomes arrogant, demanding, with a false sense of entitlement.
It wrongly assumes that the order present is a reflection of its own order, its own power.
Values becomes trivial, ephemeral, they lose relevant, severity...they become a joke.
Cynicism ensues."

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Mon Aug 08, 2016 4:53 pm

Lyssa wrote:
Did The Force send you here, young Jedi? Wink

The Force brought me here no more than gravity, electromagnetism, or chi.

Lyssa wrote:
The need for an impossible absolute certainty is already a dis/ease. And finding no safe crutch, conserves energy by relapsing into pain/pleasure as the simplistic means of surviving day to day.
This kind of self-retardation into hedonism is existing, not living.

So, how do you live your life when you are indifferent about what is real or unreal, that, in the real unprotected world could spell death or worse, for you?

I can only speculate, though I myself am not indifferent about what is real or unreal--to a point. Some things I can discern as real easily enough. Others, I'm not sure about. Most of what I'm unsure of has little bearing on how I live by life day to day, so I don't revere it.

Like a clod of dirt. No one would be so foolish as to say the clod of dirt is useless or unimportant in the grand scheme of things... because it's easy to imagine what would happen if dirt all together didn't exist. It is of great importance. Nevertheless, we don't build shrines to clods of dirt.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Thu Aug 11, 2016 2:48 pm

Black Panther wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Quote :
If the "first step" is to take the bull by the horns, its a call for a Theseus, a Wagner, a barbaric-romantic hero.

If it is to ride and direct the bull away into dharma, its a call for a Dionysos, an Achilles, a plutonic-excess hero, where the arena itself has to be widened, the context made pro-found with higher aims, the bull becomes small...
The pic. is marked under Saggitarius, the Archer-Direc-Taur of Jupiterian Excess

What follows is the sensual becomes elevated over the sexual, the beautiful stage of the Greeks.   Hebe is replaced by Ganymede, a male center of gravity.

Its well phrased, to take the sexual by the horns;
to create a hero out of the sexual
-
the character is first purely sexual but in an ordeal turns more refined, and stronger, and a new violence emerges as character;

such a hero can not live without a heart that is named in such terms as Dionysos or Poseidon Earthshaker - or Zeus Cloudgatherer - gods that tear open and enlarge the world, lightning and stormgods, and chtonic monsters of the soul that devour morality, all these are welcome in the life of the hero. The antiFaust; one simply weighs ones soul in gold and take the deal; to become what one is, is to sell ones soul to life itself. This is what the Greeks did, their profound superficiality, their uncompromising being by virtue of it not even being deep enough to compromise; one either is, or isn't; and this is how it should be, or how happiness is made. This is what Heraclitus means with fire, why fire is character and fate, and why it devours that waters of Thales to return being to the cauldron of timeless oblivion after all the goods are spent. The planetary system is the ecstatically whirling circumference of orgiastic wastefulness that is the foundation of all temporal being, that is to say of all becoming; against the backdrop of infinite possibility, spendthrift is the only path to substance, and substance is like the crown of a Geisir.


""Thus, the din and terror of the god [Dionysus], though clothed in orgy, madness, and murder reveal, on the other side of that terror, the quiet and enraptured soul of a lover.  In a note for Zarathustra Nietzsche writes: "Sexual love as a means toward an ideal (Striving to go down in one's opposite.)  Love for the suffering godhead.  To transform the figure of death as a means of victory and triumph."" - [To Nietzsche: Dionysus, I Love You! Ariadne - Claudia Crawford]
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Fri Aug 12, 2016 3:18 pm

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Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:54 pm

Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sun Nov 06, 2016 2:54 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sun Nov 06, 2016 11:04 pm

Lyssa wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

I was getting more at the power of Shakespeare's "giant hand"... But to go back, do you think the dragon sparkling with wit and malice is ideal, or the ideal state of Dionysus?
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Mon Nov 07, 2016 2:53 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

I was getting more at the power of Shakespeare's "giant hand"... But to go back, do you think the dragon sparkling with wit and malice is ideal, or the ideal state of Dionysus?


…for the others who may have been unaware of the full context.

To your question, I should think its the former, since what is Dionysos itself, is an un-ending abyss of reality. And without being the former ideal ('a' dragon), one doesnt get to know the latter ideal ('the' dragon).

See the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to Reinhart, and note 4. in it, reg. the 'monster' and Goethe.
(Goethe's line is reminiscent of Lear and the Fool in the Storm, exactly in the opp. sense of Faust's…]

And;

Nietzsche wrote:
"I concede only that cruelty now refines itself and that its older forms henceforth offend taste; but wounding and torturing with word and eye reaches its highest cultivation in times of corruption - it is now alone that malice and the delight in malice are born. People who live in an age of corruption are witty and slanderous; they know that there are other kinds of murder than by dagger or assault; they also know that whatever is well said is believed." [JW, 23]

Quote :
"The tree needs storms, doubts, worms, and malice in order to reveal the nature and strength of its sprout; may it break if it is not strong enough!" [JW, 106]

Nietzsche wrote:
My Roses

"Yes! My joy - it wants to gladden - ,
every joy wants so to gladden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?

You must crouch on narrow ledges,
prop yourselfon ropes and wedges,
prick yourself on thorny hedges!

For my joy - it loves to madden!
For my joy - is malice laden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?" [JW, Joke, Cunning, and Revenge, 9]

Nietzsche wrote:
"I am not supposing that something like human malice and perfidy - in short, the bad wild beast in us - is thereby disguised; my thought is, quite on the contrary, that it is precisely as tame animals that are we a disgraceful sight and need the disguise of morality, - that the 'inner man' in Europe is not nearly evil enough to be able to 'show himself' that way (and be beautiful that way - ). The European disguises himself with morality because he has become a sick, sickly, maimed animal which has good reasons for being 'tame'; because he is almost a monstrosity, something half, weak, awkward…" [JW, 352]


Its interesting in his mad letter on his being various incarnations, he doesn't say Shakespeare, but the poet of Shakespeare - Lord Bacon; I wonder why?

I think Lampert may have an answer, but I haven't read his book on Bacon yet.

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:01 pm

Lyssa wrote:


To your question, I should think its the former, since what is Dionysos itself, is an un-ending abyss of reality. And without being the former ideal ('a' dragon), one doesnt get to know the latter ideal ('the' dragon).


See the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to Reinhart, and note 4. in it, reg. the 'monster' and Goethe.
(Goethe's line is reminiscent of Lear and the Fool in the Storm, exactly in the opp. sense of Faust's…]

And;

Nietzsche wrote:
"I concede only that cruelty now refines itself and that its older forms henceforth offend taste; but wounding and torturing with word and eye reaches its highest cultivation in times of corruption - it is now alone that malice and the delight in malice are born. People who live in an age of corruption are witty and slanderous; they know that there are other kinds of murder than by dagger or assault; they also know that whatever is well said is believed." [JW, 23]

Quote :
"The tree needs storms, doubts, worms, and malice in order to reveal the nature and strength of its sprout; may it break if it is not strong enough!" [JW, 106]

Nietzsche wrote:
My Roses

"Yes! My joy - it wants to gladden - ,
every joy wants so to gladden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?

You must crouch on narrow ledges,
prop yourselfon ropes and wedges,
prick yourself on thorny hedges!

For my joy - it loves to madden!
For my joy - is malice laden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?" [JW, Joke, Cunning, and Revenge, 9]

Nietzsche wrote:
"I am not supposing that something like human malice and perfidy - in short, the bad wild beast in us - is thereby disguised; my thought is, quite on the contrary, that it is precisely as tame animals that are we a disgraceful sight and need the disguise of morality, - that the 'inner man' in Europe is not nearly evil enough to be able to 'show himself' that way (and be beautiful that way - ). The European disguises himself with morality because he has become a sick, sickly, maimed animal which has good reasons for being 'tame'; because he is almost a monstrosity, something half, weak, awkward…" [JW, 352]


Where is the malice here though:

"He hath subdued monsters, he hath solved enigmas. But he should also redeem his monsters and enigmas; into heavenly children should he transform them.

As yet hath his knowledge not learned to smile, and to be without jealousy; as yet hath his gushing passion not become calm in beauty."

Dionysus at his most monstrous and terrifying isn't calm, even if you might say that it's still beautiful (in a terrible glorious sort of way). It's just too intense. It might bring about the calmer beauty though. Is a lion more beautiful when it's attacking or reposed? Isn't it full of pride either way?

"Its interesting in his mad letter on his being various incarnations, he doesn't say Shakespeare, but the poet of Shakespeare - Lord Bacon; I wonder why?"

Shakespeare as a mask of Bacon, Shakespeare as a mask of Nietzsche? It's more interesting to me that Nietzsche never mentions let alone remarks on the Sonnets which are more important than any single play.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Sun Jan 15, 2017 1:14 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Where is the malice here though:

"He hath subdued monsters, he hath solved enigmas. But he should also redeem his monsters and enigmas; into heavenly children should he transform them.

As yet hath his knowledge not learned to smile, and to be without jealousy; as yet hath his gushing passion not become calm in beauty."

Dionysus at his most monstrous and terrifying isn't calm, even if you might say that it's still beautiful (in a terrible glorious sort of way).  It's just too intense.  It might bring about the calmer beauty though.  Is a lion more beautiful when it's attacking or reposed?  Isn't it full of pride either way?

The calm you are looking for is evident in the way Euripides presences Dionysos - a kind of mad, indestructible-come-what-may self-surity. His whole play is extra-ordinary around that element of calm.

In the passage you quote however, I think N. is speaking of sublimating Apollo. An individual who doesnt become conscious of how far he's come, and continues to prove and prove, will seek proof forever and generates a vibe of insufficiency unto himself; it'll stick to him. 0.85838484 has to be "rounded off" into 1. To allow oneself to turn all sharp sparks into a wholesome sun, a heat to a "light", a "leap", a god-"like" feeling, without jealously comparing what the other is achieving, feeling small before how much more is left that one still hasn't done - such greed can engulf one in envy and inevitably always feeling weak and conscious Only of his insufficiency before the enormity of life..  is a malicious delight. There has to be lust, not greed. One has to see, every challenge overcome is in its way a whole sequence of events.. a chain of life, and so 'abs.' in that poetic sense. To say the agitate passion must become clearer and calm in effortless-ease.. is to re-Cognize oneself equal to the same ease with which life meets one in a myriad forms - as luck, as fate, as challenge, as failure, as deceit, as triumph… One must come to attain that equi-poise of mind or what the ancints called [and Stoics distorted] as Ataraxia. "Imperturbation".
Such a calm, that stands there like strength slaying all doubts and impelling action, confidence… what else is "god"?
A smile, a calm that calms doubts in another and increases strength to t(h)rust in life evermore, in a desert of nothingness it Is.
The words grandeur and majesty literally mean state-liness. It alludes to something of the illusion of Smooth running harmonie of creation… a magic of effortless ease,, a no-sweat august bearing…

Thus, in the JW somewhere, he says;

Nietzche wrote:
"On meeting again.- A.: Do I still understand you right? You are searching? Where is your corner and star within the real world? Where can you lie down in the sun so that an abundance of well-being comes to you, too, and your existence justifies itself? Let everyone do that for himself- you seem to me to be saying- and let everyone put out of his mind generalities, and worries about others and about society!

B.: I want more than that; I am no seeker. I want to create for myself a sun of my own."

Its not enough to conquer dragons, but to get them to work for you willingly… like magic, create a smooth functioning universe out of them… so they dont stand there like "conquered objects and slaves", showing the victory of force/might, but to create something dignified of it all.

The hero only stands there with a spear - an air of threat and threatened;
the super-hero - is that original pic. N. visualized in the BOT - the bacchanalia where everything stands as though reconciled into a whole…

Nietzsche wrote:
"The noble caste was from the beginning always the barbarian caste: their superiority lay, not in their physical strength, but primarily in their psychical-they were more complete human beings (which, on every level, also means as much as 'more complete beasts')." [BGE, 257]

The calm of the lion is different from the calm of the child.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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