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Lyssa
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Lyssa

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Satanic Freedom - Page 3 Empty
PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyWed Jul 13, 2016 12:15 pm

Michel Serres is a postmodern secularist and Epicurean humanist, but anyone who loves mathematics and mythology, physics and poetry, religion and history, politics and philosophy all con-centrated together, should not miss reading his brilliant book 'Hermes' - against enlightenment rationalism.
He does not teach anything we dont already know, but How he writes, is very 'illuminative'.

Some fantastic and superb writing, literally on 'Satanic Freedom'.


Part I

Michel Serres wrote:
"Lucretius's De Rerum Natura is a treatise on physics.

The hymn to Venus is a song to voluptuousness, to the original power, victorious-without having fought-over Mars and over the death in­ stinct, a song to the pleasure of life, to guilt-free knowledge. The knowl­ edge of the world is not guilty but peaceful and creative. It is generative and not destructive. But these words already drift toward morality-to­ ward deeply felt emotions, toward ataraxia and toward the gaze, the theatrical gesture: to see everything serenely, in quiet contemplation; to be at last free from the gods. As if Venus were not a god. As if De Rerum Natura did not begin in prayer. A believer, an atheist? It is a clear-cut decision: there is only transcendence. Let the figures on the mountain carouse endlessly. We shall come back later to these peaks which are untouched by marine waterspouts. Transcendence is all there is, and it must be allowed its own peculiarity. But it is a matter of immanence.

Venus sive'natura. Mavors sive natura. It is a question of physics and not of feelings, of nature and not of cruel hallucinations. Immanence: laws criss-cross the world, which is unreservedly the locus of reasons. But before poetry, one must choose between two laws : the law of Eros or the law of Thanatos; springtime or the plague; birds or cadavers; and the wounds of love or rotting arms and legs. Venus, verna, volucres, volnere amoris: these are the lines that I want. To choose, then, between two sorts of physics, and the first hymn is the axiom of this choice. Venus, that is to say, nature; or Mars, that is to say, nature. And the two remain true, violence and the plague plummeting down the steepest slope, falling, without recourse, according to law.

Western science has consistently not chosen Lucretius. And by that choice, it has opted for war and plagues, for brawls, blood, and bodies burnt at the stake. Western science, from Heraclitus to Hiroshima, has only known martial nature. What has been modestly called Lucretius's pessimism, seen in the drifting of h;s text from Aphrodite to the plague in Athens, is the recognition that he has lost his bet, and that his physics has been lost as well. Thus science, or what we call science, forbids us to read this lost science. The laws of Venus-Mother Nature cannot be deciphered by the children of Mars-these children who die and will continue to die at the stake before they ever understand that locally, within the walls of Athens for example, but also globally, at some indefinite time and place, the aforementioned decomposition brings back a large, teeming, atomic populace sliding down some thalweg, and thereby, by this declination, reconstitutes a world. The poem's text is nature itself, that of Venus. The text loops back upon itself at the end of the martial events, but not in a perfect circle. The spot in which the atoms fall is not necessarily plague­ ridden Athens; the time of the clinamen is not necessarily simultaneous with leaving the dead to bury the dead.

[The clinamen is an essential concept in Serres's interpretation of Lucretius's De Rerum Natura. It is "the minimum angle to the laminar flow [that] initiates a turbulence" (Serres, "Lucretius: Science and ReIigion"). The clinamen marks the moment when an atom in laminar flow deviates from its path, collides with another atom, and initiates the formation of things and ultimately of worlds. Serres argues against com­ mentators who maintain that the clinamen is a concept introduced arbitrarily by Lucretius to explain the beginning- of the world. On the contrary, physics has shown that any laminar flow sooner or later produces a pocket of turbulence which fundamentally alters the original flow. Thus Lucretius' treatise is in suprising' ways a true treatise on physics. See "Lucretius : Science and Religion". See also Michel Serres, La Naissance de laphvsique dans Ie texte de Lucrece: Fleut'es et turbulences (Paris: Minuit. 1977). - Ed.]

Space and time are thrown here and there. There is no circle. But, stochastically, turbulences appear in space and time. And the whole text creates turbulence. Everywhere. Venus, circumfusa, is diffused all around the reclining body of Mars, who has been thrown down to the nadir he had searched for. She bothers him and disturbs his law. The creative science of change and of circumstance is substituted for the physics of the fall, of repetition, and of rigorous trains of events. Neither a straight line nor a circle: a spiral (volute).

Return to the declination. The minimal angle to laminar flow initiates a turbulence. And from these pockets of turbulence here and there in in­ definite times and places, there is one world among many, that of things and of men.

Without the declination, there are only the laws of fate, that is to say, the chains of order. The new is born of the old; the new is only the repetition of the old. But the angle interrupts the stoic chain, breaks the foederafati, the endless series of causes and reasons. It disturbs, in fact, the laws of nature. And from it, the arrival of life, of everything that breathes; and the leaping of horses. The order of reasons is repetitive, and the train of thought that comes from it, infinitely iterative, is but a science of death. A science of dead things and a strategy of the kill. The order of reasons is martial. The world is in order, according to this mathematical physics in which the Stoics are met by Plato up the line and by Descartes further down, and where order reigns supreme over piles of cadavers. The laws are the same everywhere ; they are thanatocratic. There is nothing to be learned, to be discovered, to be invented, in this repetitive world, which falls in the parallel lines of identity. Nothing new under the SUIl of identity. It is information-free, complete redundance. The ch-ains of cause and effect, the fall of atoms, and the indefinite repetition of letters are the three necessary figures of science's nullity.

Determination, identity, repetition, informa­ tion-free, not a drop of knowledge : extermination, not even> the shadow of a life, death at the end of entropy. Then Mars rules the world, cutting up the bodies into atomized pieces, letting them fall. This is the foedus

fati, what physics understands as a law; things are that way. It is also the legal statute in the sense of dominant legislation: they wish things to be that way. Mars chose this sort of physics, the science of the fall and of silence. And here again is the plague. It is always the same sequence of events: an epidemic becomes pandemic in proportions, if not to say a pandemonium ; violence never stops, streaming the length of the !halweg ; the atoms fall endlessly; reasons repeat indefinitely. Buboes, weapons, miasmas, causes : it is always the same law, in which the effect repeats the cause in exactly the same way. Nothing is new under the sun of identity and nothing is kept under the same old sun. Nothing new and nothing born, there is no nature. There is death forever. Nature is put to death or it is not allowed to be born. And the science of all this is nothing, can be summed up as nothing. Stable, unchanging, redundant, it recopies the same writing in the same atoms-letters. The law is the plague; the reason is the fall; the repeated cause is death; the repetitive is redundance. And identity is death. Everything falls to zero, a complete lack of information, the nothingness of knowledge , non-existence . The Same is Non-Being.

The angle of inclination cures the plague, breaks the chain of violence, interrupts the reign of the same, invents the new reason and the new law, foedera naturae, gives birth to nature as it really is. The minimal angle of turbulence produces the first spirals here and there. It is literally revolu­ tion. Or it is the first evolution toward something else other than the same. Turbulence perturbs the chain, troubling the flow of the identical as Venus had troubled Mars.

The first vortices. Turbantibus aequora ventis: pockets of turbulence scattered in flowing fluid, be it air or salt water, breaking up the par­ allelism of its repetitive waves. The sweet vortices of the physics of Venus. How can your heart not rejoice as the flood waters abate (decliner) and the primordial waters begin to form, since in the same lofty position you escape from Mars and from his armies that are readied in perfect battle formation ? In these lofty heights that have· been strengthened by the wisdom of the sages, one must choose. between these two sorts of physics. The physics of the military troops in their rank and file forma­ tion of parallel lines, chains, and sequences. Here are the federated ones bound to fate, sheets of atoms bearing arms, exactly arranged, instructa, in a well-ordered fashion, in columns. This is the learned science of the teachers, the structure of divisions, the Heraclitean physics of war, rivalry, power, competition, which miserably repeats to death the blind shadows of its redundant law. Arrange yourselves in ranks; you will learn about order, about the structure of order, about the chain of reasons, the knowledge of ranks, of blood. Or else the physics of vortices, of sweetness, and of smiling voluptuousness. On the high seas, people work among these vortices: they are tossed about in the roll that, until recently, was called "turbination." They are perturbed. The uexan; however, is only cruel to a few landlubbers who have never been at sea. The sea-swept movement of intertwined lovers, or the voluptuous movements of the roll of the high seas. Listen to the line that swirls its spirals : suaue, uentis, uexari, uoluptas. It's the revolution of voluptuousness, the physics of Venus chosen over that of Mars.

A new return to declination. The difficulty of establishing or reading the theoretical text is added to the usual misinterpretations of translating it. Why, here and now, will (volonte) and voluptuousness (volupte)? Despite all their discussions, grammarians don't really know where to put the consonants: volu(n)tas, volu(p)tas. This doubt is a meaningful one. Once again, the demonstration begins. But from the beginning, we are fore­ warned. Maritime turbulence, looked at in bad weather from the shore, only stirs up fluids: winds and waters, turbantibus aequora ventis. And in the theoretical text, the reference to individual bodies again is only related to fluids : imbris uti guttae, like drops of rain, per aquas atque aera rarum, through the water or the rare medium of air; and again, corpus aquae naturaque tenuis aeris. It is certainly a question of weight, of gravity, but never of solids. It is the fall of heavy bodies, but not in the same sense that we have thought of these words as)f instinctively since the dawn of the classical era. And from this comes the increased probability of the proposed solution : the schema is a hydraulic one

In nature, living beings are born from flows. And these flows are laminar, their laminae parallel to one another; the declination is the tiniest angle necessary and sufficient to produce turbulence. From this comes the text that follows: what are thesefoederafati, these laws of fate that are broken by declination? The subsequent lines define them : they are sequences, where cause repeats cause ad infinitum. From this, the bundle, the sheaf, the infinite cylinder of parallel consequences. Trains of reason rain down in torrents. No longer, as in the model, are they atoms; they are neither concrete nor quasi-concrete, but laws or equations. The fall is the plan of their necessity. However, the declination inter­ rupts the model as well as the theory, perturbing them, introducing tur­ bulence. And since the model and theory are necessitarian, what can we call this declination except liberty? But beware: it is only a question of animantibus. Life has a degree of freedom relative to mechanical con­ straints. The Latin Libera remains concrete relative to weights, shackles, chains, and burdens. The laws of necessity, however, remain those of fall and equilibrium. And its follows, then, that life deviates from equi­ librium. How can this be explained materially? By visible and tangible phenomena that can be produced in experiments on flows; by analogy with the concrete model. Turbulence deviates from equilibrium. And the beginning of the vortex is the minimal angle of declination. The fact that life disturbs the order of the world means literally that at first, life is turbulence. What you see from the top of the cliff, in its sweetness, is the first-born being arising out of the waters, Aphrodite, who has just been born in the swirl of liquid spirals, Nature being born in smiling volup­ tuousness.

This is not contrary to the law, nor delirious, nor absurd, nor illogical. Nor is it as opposed as people have said to the teachings of Epicurus, which are strewn with vortices and turbulent clouds, as in the letter to Pythocles, or in one of the lost treatises which was in fact named "Of the Angle in the Atom."

The fact that the declination has been mocked, that it seemed to be a distortion or a strain on the system, a fiction, as Cicero says, and that we have remained blind to such a simple phenomenon is really quite normal, considering that we looked at it by using another paradigm.  

It is as difficult to become a phenome­ nologist again as it is to bre,ak the contracts of fate. Epicurus and Lucre­ tius change the paradigm. And Marx, who, while seeing subjectivity in the atom just as if it were a question of a Leibnizian monad, and seeing the arbiter in the clinamen as if he were rewriting the Theodicy, is doubly right to call Themistocles to mind.4 Athens is near destruction; let us leave the city and wage a sea battle.  

Since Democritus, the new knowledge is aware of infinitesimal questions. It gets inspiration from hydrodynamic models and turns its attention toward the formation of living systems. It is more physical, less mathe­ matical (since the probabilist organon is missing) than Platonic knowl­ edge, more phenomenological and less measured. But, most important, Athena is in the ocean. The chosen model is a fluid one. It is no longer a crystal, nor the five regular polyhedrons that are the solids of the Timaeus; it is flow. The nature of Mars, of martial physics, is one of hard, rigid, and rigorous bodies; the physics and nature of Venus are formed in flows. The residual hardness of the atom is beyond the threshold of perception; what counts in experiments and in phenomena is large numbers, the crowd of elements, the unmeasurable cataract, the river. And henceforth we are able to understand this, since our newly de­ veloping physics tells somewhat the same story too, by flows, random events, systems, disequilibria. We misunderstood Lucretius because we were the children of Plato and the Stoics, because the fundamental facts of Epicurean nature remained marginal in traditional science, which was really' not very Archimedean. From that point on, we ruled them out of the game in the history of science . Moreover, we put their nature outside nature, placing them in the soul and the subject. On the contrary, however, these facts are the foundation of materialism. Atoms are not souls; the soul itself is atomic.

All non-physical interpre­tations of the clinamen remain essentially idealist, as it were, or, more precisely, spiritualist, along the classic lines of philosophies of the mind, of ideologies of power and of military science. Classical science deserves classical philosophy. Find a good dictionary and verify for yourself that "classis" in Latin means "army."

But we have arrived at the contract-at the change Lucretius made in the contract. Why should the laws of nature or the necessity of fate be named foedus or foedera? Foedera naturae or foedera fati: pacts, alliances, conventions. Are we able to understand a political or strategic termino­logy, like the presence of the divine figures of Venus and Mars, in a treatise of objective science that is supposed to release us from the hold of the gods, and that is directed toward a type of wisdom in which political ambition and the dealings in the forum will no longer play a part? Our vocabulary is itself mired in just such an ambiguity: the order is of the world and of the street; the law is of the code and of the laboratory; the rule is operative and civil; the class is logical, social, and scholastic, etc.

Every war finally ends by a treaty of alliance, a foedus, unless it con­ tinues to the point of total annihilation or to the pandemonium of the plague. In the beginning of the fifth book, the struggle with nature is set out in the labors of Hercules, the first singular case of every war in general. Here the laborer and the soldier are one and the same. The field of Quirinus is occupied by Mars. The land of the producer is ravaged by the legionnaire, who disguises himself as a laborer. This theft, for it is a theft or an embezzlement, is part of a stubborn tradition. In the last century, Michelet always used Herakles as both model and god; he is the fighter who seems to be the worker-hero. In point of fact, the real pro­ducer has too much to do to exhaust his energies in non-productive aggression. Lucretius denounces unlawful occupation perpetrated, as usual, in the name of terror. Who today is afraid of the Nimean lion or of the Hydra of Lerna? If there are monsters here or there, go elsewhere, and that's the end to that. Once the battle is over, Hercules is useless - the­ atrical, in fact. Epicurus put down his weapons. He speaks, gives the laws, dictates the foedus. The new alliance with nature. With Epicurus, the Heraclitean period, in which war is the mother of all and in which physics remained in Ares's realm, comes to an end. Thus Lucretius criti­ cizes Heraclitus with severity but treats Empedocles with consideration: this other Sicilian had guessed the coming of the contract, in his intro­ duction of Friendship or Love. Faced with Hatred or Discord, a joyful Aphrodite had already arisen. Epicurus and Lucretius have put down their weapons and driven Mars out of physics. Can we understand that, outside of mythology and its old-fashioned naIvetes? Yes, and in spades." [Hermes]

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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Lyssa
Har Har Harr
Lyssa

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Join date : 2012-03-01
Location : The Cockpit

Satanic Freedom - Page 3 Empty
PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyWed Jul 13, 2016 12:17 pm

Part II


Michel Serres wrote:
"Bacon decreed that one cannot rule Nature except by obeying her. Descartes said that one has to become her master and possessor. The contractual alliance has been 'xoken and the battle starts again, with nature as the adversary; hydra, boar, or lion. Against nature, one plays without cheating; abiding by the laws of the hunt until checkmate. Epicurus has just failed, as well as the Aphrodite of Lucretius. It is the well-armed Syracusan who takes the lead. The method is no longer a contract but a strategy, a tactic and not a pact, a fight to death and not a coitus. Hercules returns in Bacon's work to go beyond the pillars of Hercules. And Archimedes, in Descartes's, moves the earth.6 And thus the figures of antiquity, such as Herakles, Mars, and Venus, are prosopopoeiae, since they can be reduced to principles and conditions.

In the establishment of objective knowledge, as in its historical be­ ginning, there is a set of decisions or preliminary choices that often remain unnoticed. Here is one of them: either there is a contractual agreement or there is a military strategy; either there is the foedus which calls an end to combat or there is the tactical game of command and mastery. Who leads science and who decides what it shall be ? The answer to the question, which appears to be mythological or religious, might be Mars or Venus, Hercules or Quirinus. Modern thinkers substitute other questions: what? o!' how? By contract or by strategy. Yet behind the abstract principles of method, our contemporaries rediscover the ques­ tion: who? and the language of antiquity; behind metaphysics, they dis­ cover thp- groups in power. Who? the producing class or the dominating class? And thus the military and its generals. Lucretius speaks of epony­ mous heroes; Descartes and Bacon speak in abstract principles, but these principles sparkle with metaphors; we speak as historians. The question, however, remains the same in all three languages, bearing on the very conditions of possibility of science. What can be said about nature : is she an enemy or a slave, an adversary or a partner in a contract that Lucretius would have made with Venus? The question is neither naive nor fri­ volous, but consequential. Will knowledge follow the downhill.slope of destruction, violence, and the plague or, inversely, that of peace and rejoicing? Life or death, that is the question. And there again, our knowl­ edge hears the voice of Lucretius.

It is a condition and a postulate. The content, norms, and results of science remain invariable in relation to these postu­ lates. The theorems and protocols are free in relation to these decisions. This is one of the weightiest problems that we have had to bear. It is difficult to think of a rigorous and exact science that might have been conditioned by Venus and not by Mars, for peace and not for destruc­ tion, by a contract and not by a strategy, by workers and not by generals, since Western science has always followed the weight of power. In other words: science is conditioned by postulates or by decisions that are generally social, cultural, or historical in nature, which form it and orient it; nevertheless, science is universal, and independent of the type of pre-established contract. Two and two make four; heavy bodies fall, according to the law of gravity; entropy increases in a closed system, re­ gardless of the latitude and whatever the ruling class. I cannot think of a mountain, a border, or a date which makes the agreement of scientists and everyone else relative on these points. Science is conditioned but unconditional. No one has ever escaped this dilemma.

It is, however, rather easy to distinguish the first conditions which give rise to what is conditioned while leaving the content of what is conditioned independent. They are said to be conditioning and not determining. These first conditions are, moreover, sufficient. A small room, a table and a chair, three notebooks, two pencils, and the average salary needed to make all these things possible, and, thus, the whole society, with its history and its divisions, all form a set of conditions for me to write a book. But this book can come to exist or not, and if so, it can be a collec­ tion of equations or of poems, copied or inventive, exact or erroneous, red-hot or warmed over. In short, in this case and a thousand like it, you can always proceedfrom the product to its conditions, but neverfrom the con­ ditions to the product. This rather simple principle has led some or all of contemporary philosophy into a process of retrospection. Even its lucid discourse is unflagging as long as it goes backward, with perfect hind­ sight, toward the multiple conditionings; but it is powerless once it has to go forward from the condition to the thing itself. And for that reason it occupies a position of non-productivity, not for any poverty inherent in the theory, but because of an interminable and indeterminable theory.

Science is always the same, but its topography changes depending on the initial contracts. It is always the same clay, but the shape changes. For all I know, one might make a sword or a ploughshare from the same piece of iron. The physics of Lucretius-I have just shown this through these models-is in fact the same as that of Archimedes, but the postulation of Venus and the exclusion of Mars transform it.7 Hydrostatics in the first is related to the constitution of living beings; in the latter, it is related to the theory of ship-building. Fluid mechanics can be a basis for biology or for a technology of the inert. The model does not vary; the relief changes.

the guiding, light in science is, more often than you think, the arrangement of the parts. Science has made the necessary arrangements, as it were. We forget all too often that exploitation is originally a spatial term, from "explicit," related in turn to "explicate": the network of folds (Plis) on a manifold. Classification, not only that of sciences, is always already there. It shows where to begin, where to go, the best route to take, and the region with the most interchanges. This is true for knowledge in general, for the encyclopedia: why put one disci­pline first, or in the middle; why start with a certain proposition or a certain experiment? What shapes a generation is less what it knows than the learning process that led it to this knowledge. Invention, discovery, rediscoveries, or what you will, all follow from a certain type of training. The pedagogue is a guide, the word itself says so; education is conducted by a duce, the word again attests to the fact; and the method is a path. And the global plan of this complex and the local connections of its graph are determined by a preliminary choice. Then the condition determines the outcome.

If knowledge is used for death and destruction, it is because Mars or the military, Bacon's commander, or Descartes's master and possessor stood guard in the heginning. This is true as well outside of science : there are few untrammeled spaces : the paths have already been blazed and the classifications posited. Well before forces come into contact with each other, well before confrontation is produced, finds its equi­ librium, or wavers, some nameless predecessor has chosen the battlefield and the firing lines that will decide the outcome. Strategy is not only a form of dynamics or energetics but first of all a topology. The presence of Mars or of Venus determines the shape of the realm of knowledge. Science has always been led by its flow charts.

Foedus is thus the pact after the war, the peace treaty. The two enemies had been locked in combat with one another, and now the armistice has been signed. Up to now, it has been a question of science, and we did not understand the part played by decision. Postulate and decision, products of culture. Still more? Foedus is generally a contract, a, social contract, for example. The social contract, however, can easily be rendered in the form of an armistice, once the all-but war is over. It is the plague and the end of the plague. The plague is a figure of violence in general, a multiple chain with an explosive power to propagate itself, and something which threatens a city or group with extermination : Athens, in Lucretius's work, or the realm of the Lion. From this comes the fable which tells how the judicial process was invented after a jackass had been killed as an emissary victim.s This violent communication, where the group's problems are at maximum-for its very existence comes into play here-stops with the use of force: the sacrifice of the one who will bear all the sins of the group. Justice is rendered, which means that justice appears, forming and formulating itself as an institution. And hence, the whole poem loops back upon itself without closing, just like a spiral. The plague at Athens has started: everyone whips himself bloody before the funeral pyres. The process only ends when all the fighters have died.

To check the crisis, to interrupt it, that is to say, to topple the body of Mars, forcing him to bend over backwards, there has to be a convention, a pact, a foedus, a judicial institution, or something like it. This contract can only be reached through a sacrificial murder. But whose? Mars can only be stopped at the altar of Iphianassa. The elite of Greek warriors stain the stone of the virgin Trivia with the blood of Iphigenia. This is the ordinary, trivial, and traditional solution, offered by every religion and every brand of politics. Iphigenia, that is to say, the genealogy of sovereign power. Lucretius makes it a point to give her name in Greek. She dies, and the ribbons of her untied headband dangle down, all the same; there is an abolition of differences. Her throat slit by her father's, sword, she is a virgin who had not yet bled; non-violent and innocent, she causes the agitation of the wind-swept high seas. For the storm, too, is the plague. There are two figures of violehce : flood and pandemonium. Murder increases along the chain, the two figures growing or escalating, as it were. Without the ritual killing of the virgin, the war would have  taken place among the Greek warriors themselves before they could ever have gotten to Troy. The waters are finally in movement and the miasmas reappear. Here then is the contract, the blood contract, a contract of the oldest tradition, maybe even a predestined one: the foederafati.

From that point on, what has to be stopped is the major threat, but its archaic safeguard as well. The plague, of course, and the storm, the fatal propagation of murder, but also -especially - the solution offered by the sacred to this collective problem: human sacrifice. Iphigenia must be saved.

The problem at hand con­ sists in stemming a series of murders without another assassination. For that solution is only temporary until a new crisis, a new squall, or a new epidemic erupts and the whole process is repeated. Nothing is new under the bloodied sun of history. The plague reappears in an Athens be­ strewn with cadavers. The scapegoats too must be saved by putting a stop to the series of sacrifices. From this comes the reversal: he who speaks and thereby gives rise to a new history does not place the sins of the world on the shoulders of another; of his own volition, he takes upon himself the thunderous roars of the heavens, the fire that has been set at the world's gates, the wrath of Jupiter. Spontaneously, he accepts the dangerous position that is determined by his knowledge of the laws of the universe and of human mechanisms. Faced with these horrible menaces, he goes forward unarmed. Epicurus, therefore, once again takes us away forever from the storms, putting us in a quiet spot away from the water.

To take on oneself alone the fires of the heavens and not to foist unleashed violence on the first passerby, the virgin Iphigenia, to go forward unarmed, straight ahead, lucidly deciphering what is happening, is to proceed in a fashion opposed to the world's religions and contrary to the terrifying constitution of the sacred. But this conduct can only be practiced if one knows the laws of constitution and if one is a master of justice. Epicurus is a god outside of all the gods, the new god of another history who has examined all the archaic traditions and turned against them. He abolishes the sacred by fulfilling it. The atheistic Epicureans were not wrong to venerate the founder of this science as a god. And through his courageous gesture, heroic above the call of heroism, Epicurus lets Venus be born above the troubled waters. That is to say, the foedus, love, and friendship; the contract of nature,foedera naturae. It is finally definitive, and the gods are no longer in the world, since an end to the ancient repetition of the sacrificial crisis has intervened, a cessation which is the basis of Epicurean wisdom.  

Freed, then, from this violence, henceforth independent of sacred space and time that no longer have any relation to us, with our feet firmly planted on high ground, protected from the sea, strengthened by the wisdom of the sages against the machinations of Mars, we are now able to let things come into being as objects, outside the mechanisms that regulate our deregulated violence. The sacred had formed a field of knowledge of the intersubjective and of polemical relationships. Nature thereby veiled itself in the dynamic laws of the group. Once the sar:red is placed outside of the world in faraway locations which are of no interest to us, Nature is born, objectively , bearir g her own laws. The solution founds science, the science of Venus without violence and without guilt, where thunder is no longer the anger of Zeus and where the level of the waters remains stable. In the new contract, the exact word can be spoken.

Might this be a general solution? Does science regularly appear in history in the wake of figures like Epicurus?

Foedus is the pact made after the war. The laws of nature, pronounced by the sciences, remain conditioned and then determined in their global arrangement by such a preliminary contract: the choice between Venus and Mars, for example. Foedus is, moreover, the convention that puts an end to all-out war. During a first period of history, exterminating violence freezes, coagulates, stops during the sacrificial murder: Iphigenia. But a new crisis makes it start up again, and the plague begins anew. One must start over. The sacred is formed by this catastrophic and repetitive dynamic. The hero Epicurus willingly takes the place of the virgin; unarmed, he disarms the process, gives rise to a new history, an objective science. One is finally able to see how Venus replaces Mars. Foedus is, once and for all, a political constitution.

Henceforth, what does the foedus mean?

One must get back to things themselves. Almost at the beginning of the first book, Lucretius distinguishes the coniuncta from the euenta, according to a standard division of Epicurean physics. What is conjoined to a body is that which is destroyed if this thing is separated from it. Thus it is the conjunction as such. The examples given clarify the definition. What is conjoined to the stone is weight; to fire, heat; to water, liquidity. Thus, all bodies are tangible and the void is not tangible. It is a question of what Leibniz in the seventeenth century would have called a well-founded phenomenon, whose internal relations and specific external relations are stable.

Atoms are organized here in well­ established phenomena. Their reunion is a convention, a coition, coitus, and a conjunction, coniuncta. Without this conjugation or meeting, the gatherings become undone and the phenomena have no basis; physics, in its three fields, disappears. Physics remains the fundamental theory of the void and of atoms, as if it were the science before the birth of things, but it is destroyed as the science of nature. Bodies are made of atoms and void, and the study of bodies consists in finding out how they are made. Their substance is particular to them and their nature is relational. The essential thing, then, for an exact discourse de rerum natura is relation or interrelation-the simplex, as combinatory topology says; bonds, as chemistry says; interaction, as modern physics says. This set of relations without which nothing can come into being or exist is made up-from the factual point of view-of coniuncta, which are the stable networks of composition. And in theory, it is enunciated by the Foedus.

In a certain sense, the proto-model of fundamental physics has no laws. Given an infinite void in which atomic clouds move about, a space in which sets and groups move, as soon as a phenomenon appears or a body is formed a law can be stated. The laws of nature come from conjugation ; there is no nature but that of compounds. In the same way, there are the laws of putting together letters-atoms to produce a text. The alphabetical proto­ cloud is without law and the letters are scattered at random, always there as a set in space, as language; but as soon as a text or speech appears, the laws of good formulation, combination, and conjugation also appear. These laws, however, are only federation. The law repeats the fact itself: while things are in the process of being formed, the laws enunciate the federated. A thing or a state of things, like fluid mechanics and the theories of equilibrium and heat, can take these laws into account, and are conjugated de facto and federated de jure.

The foedera naturae, the laws of nature, are the foedera coniunctorum, the laws of conjugation, but they are only possible by dint of this conjugation: con­ iuncta foederum, the composition of the laws. There is no distance from the fact to the laws; the space between things and languages is reduced to zero. In both cases-but there is really only one case-every formation is a linking; everything is only relation. Aside from relation, there are only clouds in the void, be they made of letters or of atoms. Language is born with the birth of things and by the very same process. Things appear as the bearers of their own language. Coniuncta and foedera are the same word : stable gatherings of elements, of whatever sort.

Venus states the foedus, the contract, as an ego coniungo vos. Venus assembles the atoms, like the compounds. She is not transcendent like the other gods, but immanent in this world, the being of relation. She is identical to the relation. Venus sive natura sive coniuncta sive foedera. She inspires inclina­ tion; she is inclination. Declination is also a differential of voluptuous­ ness, the first trouble before a linking. Only Aphrodite governs: who was ever able to govern without the angle of the rudder (gouvemail)? Look at lightning in Heraclitus's work: it is said to be the governor of all things. But how could that be without the inclination of the rudder blade or the inclined zig-zag with which it marks the sky? It is the furrow of the world, inscribed and traced in the clouds, the mark of the rudder solicited in an oblique fashion, the seal struck by the government, by its one and only law. Here again: nature is formed by linkings; these relations, criss­ crossing in a network, necessarily begin with a differential angle. And Venus inclining is the declination itself.

Here is the complement of the model. Given a flow of atoms, by the declination, the first tangent to the given curve, and afterward, by the vortex, a relatively stable thing is constituted. It stays in disequilibrium, ready to break, then to die and disappear but nonetheless resistant by its established conjunctions, between the torrential flow from the upstream currents and the river flowing downstream to the sea. It is a stationary turbulence. At the heart of this nucleus, the coniuncta crystallize in a network. The thing thereby has weight and, as a liquid, it heats up. Physics studies these stabilities. All around these volutes, which together are the very nature of things, the unending flow continues to shower atoms. They occur, finding these voluminous knots here and there, conjugate vaguely with the profiles of the objects, and then quickly move toward the exit, disheveled and undone, resuming their parallel path. Barely a disturbance or ripple on the water's surface. Without objects of matter and space, without quasi-stationary formations, this movement would not be thus, nor would it be perceived. It is a poorly grounded phenomenon, totally bereft of conjunctions. It occurs, crosses, expires, or disperses: it is an event.

The clock that Lucretius placed right in the middle of nature cannot mark Newtonian time; as the clock is the totality of things, between their birth and death, it marks a Bergsonian, that is, thermodynamic, time-an irreversible and irrevocable time, marked like the endless flow of atoms, flowing, running, crumbling (coulant, courant, croulant) toward their downfall and death. Things have weight: they fall, seeking their peaceful rest. Fluid, they flow; hot, they cool off. Downfall, death, dispersal : breaks, dichotomies, atoms. Atomic flow is residual: the background of being, white noise. This world set adrift never to return is bestrewn, here and there, at indefinite times and in indefinite places, with pockets, where vortices are born in pseudo­ returns. Clocks appear with these objects, spiraling, shifting clocks which from their moment of birth begin to mark the time of death. The Lu­ cretian world is globally entropic, but negatively entropic in certain swirling pockets. Conjunction is negative entropy; the complex thus formed counts the quantity of information set adrift. The event which barely occurs and almost immediately disintegrates minimally resists the irreversible flow, carrying little information. Newtonian time, which is reversible, marks resistance to the irrevocable. It is absent from this sort of physics, and that is why our forefathers were unable to imagine that Lucretian physics ever existed, with the possible exception of Bergson, who thrived on it. Irreversible time is the master here: the physics of things resists it in spots, but in the flow of the drift; history follows, producing barely a ripple in the flow. History flows around physics.

Hence Lucretius's examples. In the same way that conjunctions were heavy, liquid, and hot, and thereby produced the classifications of physics, events are all of a sociopolitical order. Slavery and freedom are placed on either side of the couple poverty-wealth, as if the central pair were the nucleus of the surrounding pair. The condition of the slave and that of the free man are placed alongside material and spatial objects: a dearth of bread, a wealth of money. Symptomata, says Epicurus, of events; sym­ bebekota, he says, of conjunctions. Slavery and freedom are symptoms of wealth and poverty, themselves symptoms of better-connected material things. History is a symptom of nature. Time is the symptom 9f symp­ toms. Let us take the war now, be it the current one or the Trojan War. Mars is only an accident of stable Venus, a temporary relief outside the assembled convention. Mars passes by, badly connected. Vulcan would have to capture him in his net, as Homer says, meaning a penis captivus. Otherwise, Mars is only in transit, passing through. Final example, agree­ ment. Here is thefoedus, the politicalfoedus, pronounced after the war, and following every war. Far from projecting the constitution of political order on the state of things, unconsciously, as they say, Lucretius dis­ tinguishes very clearly the conjunctival, contractual, stable links among atoms themselves from the circumstantial and unstable historical contract which would be nothing without the existence of the former and which quickly disappears around them. Politics and history are only the phe­nomenal symptoms of the basic, fundamental combination.

Lucretius translates syrnptomata by euenta. Once again the Greek word has to do with falling. Things fall and meet each other along the way. There are bodies, be they solid, liquid, living, or whatever. Atoms are a basic example: collision and chance. Cournot says exactly the same thing when he talks about the intersection of independent series. [The nineteenth-century mathematician, economist, and philosopher, Antoine Cournot, argued that there are two sorts of causal chains: interdependent ones and independent ones. The intersection of independent causal chains gives rise to chance occurrences. See Antoine Coumot, An Essay on the Foundations of Our Knowledge - Ed.]

Thus the small amount of linkage between events, as if the encounter produced no, or few, relations. Venus is absent from history and politics. Lucretius adopts, instead of this con-, a prefix of emission. This is very important, for it is at the exit that we see that it was only a question of politics and history; nothing remains but ruins, and the scattered pieces are once again in parallel free fall, while the world con­ tinues to turn in a more or less stable way. The symptom was a phantom.

The peace of the Garden , its tranquil serenity, is called "ataraxia." But the soul is formed of atoms, like the body, like the world. Ataraxia, a moral state, is thus a physical state, one without divergence or distance. But the latter model shows in infinite space a chance multiplicity of vortices of which one of the sets is nature, this nature, and of which the set of all the sets is the plurality of worlds. For Lucretius, and for us as well, the universe is the global vortex of local vortices. And so it goes in his poem. Ataraxia is the absence of trouble. Nature is rivers and whirl­ winds. The life of the wise man is free from turbulence, yet his life is the closest to nature. In the name of Epicureans, Seneca gives this bit of advice: ad legem naturae revertamur. Return to the natural law, to the foedus. Revertamur, morals and vortex again.

What nature teaches us is the streaming of the endless flow, the atomic cascade and its turbulences-waterspouts and whirlwinds, the celestial wheel endlessly spinning, the conic spiral that generates things. The soul, like the body, like bodies, is made up of hot atoms, airborne and windswept, unnamed; that is to say, it is made up of the principles of heat, of fluidity in general, and of weight; it is the seat of turbulences. It burns, it is disturbed, it loses its balance, like the sea, like a volcano, like thunder. The same space and the same substance produce the same phe­ nomena according to the same laws. Disturbances that we give names to out of our fear of the gods, or of the anguish of death. The soul is tied in knots, just like the world. And like the world, it is unstable, in a state of disequilibrium.

Physics and psychology account for these scattered knots where dis­ turbances occur. Within the three physical disciplines, the fundamental theory is connected to atomic laminar flow, the void, and basic principles. Within cultural psychology, marked with anguish and anxiety by the gods and by history, burdened with the relative and adventitious events of strife and combat, morals are linked to a primary state of things. Ataraxia returns to the initial turbulences before there was a disturbance in the straight line of the flow. The wise man is the basic world. He re­ discovers material being, the base of being itself, where no ripple has yet troubled the surface of the waters.

Once more, we have to mark irreversible time on the clocks. It ticks away, irreversibly, marking degradation. The things that were formed in the hollows of the vortices lose their atoms little by little in the down­ stream flow. It is the time of wear and tear, the statues of the gods worn out by the kisses of the faithful. The world is mortal. This is thermo­ dynamic time: time of heat, weight, and flow, the disciplines of the trivium. It is the drift toward the plague and toward dissolution. We call this the second principle of thermpdynamics, known to the Greeks at least since Heraclitus. 'History, or the idea of history, is only the trans­ lation or transposition of this material principle. It is not only the copy or reproduction of a mythical paradise lost. If, from the beginning until today, the earth has become tired and no longer creates any new species, if men are less solid and more fragile, it is because the devouring down­ stream flow has stolen a share of their atoms. More and more, they are the hollow men, offered up to the erosion of irreversible time. Atomist physicists take up an old tradition, but they place it in the realm of the demonstrable and experimentally provable. From this point on, history has two components: irrevocable wear and tear and the human labor which tends to compensate for erosion. The farmer adapts to the aging of the earth : through his labor, he wrests from the earth what it used to give freely. Progressive civilization is merely a response to the wear and tear of time. Civilization goes upstream in the entropic river. Hence labor, of course, but also language and writing. Culture and agriculture have always been on the same vector.

Given all that, the physics of the Atomists also has an equivalent of what we call the first principle. The universe is regulated on a constancy, an isonomia. We are not yet at the invariability of forces or energy, but everything occurs as if this were the case. To the degradation of one thing corresponds the birth of another somewhere else ; to the death of a world from plagues and funeral pyres, the appearance somewhere, any­ where, of a new world. The thesis of the plurality of existing worlds is thereby made necessary. The struggling, dying world gives up its atoms in a cataract to the basic flow; it is·untied and undone analytically; elsewhere, in an indefinite place and time, a declination is the herald of a new vortex. It is therefore necessary to have a multiplicity in infinite space for a constancy to be established in the field of eroded disap­ pearance, of irreversibility, and of chance. Invariability is global. Physics presents a system, but not a hierarchical, deductive, or closely woven one like that in the series of the Stoics; it is a physics of set theory whose general equilibrium is a balance sheet that takes the stochastic into ac­ count. Locally, this meta-stability is seen for the time being on the threshvld marked by the rising of the waters; the theory announces it by unchangeable laws; praxis ensures it by the success of the provisions. Here again is afoedus: the pact is constancy and the contract, insurance. Lucretius goes still further, and, without a doubt, more deeply, into the matter.

He guarantees the stability of the flow itself in its movement and direction, so it attains homeorrhesis. Whatever the changing combinations of atoms, whatever the obstacles in front of them, be they monsters or androgynes, the aleatory vortices end up by producing a coherent, well­ founded (that is to say, conjoined) world. Further on, the conjunction is undone in the streaming of mortality. Still further on, in that which is foreseeable globally but unforeseeable locally, the declination reappears. The clinamen is a principal element of homeorrhesis, assuring the stability of the chreodes, being a differential of a chreode. In order to be no longer only static, in order for the system to be no longer only a statue, in order for stability itself to attain movement, what else is necessary at the beginning besides an inclination? I am not saying that it is sufficient, but necessary. The river must have a fall line for it to remain stable in its variable bed. Declination is a powerful discovery of physics and me­ chanics. It breaks with the common antithesis of rest and movement of

Parmenides and Heraclitus, much better than Plato had done it. In evidence and in simplicity, in that which can be touched and tested. With the declination, what is stable is movement along the path of its flow, both in its general direction and in its point-by-point passage. It is declination which ensures the deepest and most exact invariability, although tradition, up to modern times, has only seen it as paradoxes. For it is the condition of a great synthesis between static and dynamic. Hence, the following recapitulation: the old unitary Being is multiplicity; there are atoms. The stable Being at rest is movement: atomic flow, streaming, cascades. The global fluidity of local solids. Here is irreversible time. The tiniest possible angle, the angle of contingence, marks a direction, which needs no other referent than the intrinsic one of the flow: and we have a thalweg. A stability is recognized, exists, is thinkable and tangible in and through fluvial flow; it is homeorrhesis. Through conjunction a reunification is possible. The physics of things has made the round of ancient physics, leaving the head gods atop their mountain. In the same way that the analysis of being produced atoms, the analysis of vectorial directions of space produces the clinamen. Movement and rest are joined in turbulence , constancy and variation, life and death. There was perhaps nothing in all of Antiquity more accurately seen and stated.

Everything is abraded by irreversible atomic erosion. The increasing work of humanity seeks to check this irrevocable movement. It is progress; it is not progress: history advances on the surface but backs up below, climbing back up a flow which goes down more quickly than it can advance. Catching up is forestalled; the plague will return. The euenta slide over the coniuncta; history skids over matter. The first global vortex. Humanity builds weak cohesions on top of material centers with strong cohesion in the process of coming undone. Athens, preeminent city of culture, grapes and figs, discourse and science, has to end, despite all this work, in a scattered pile of atomized bodies. The ashes of the funeral pyres are given over to the cataract. The irrevocable fate of laborious transformations. This history is doomed from the beginning. Hence, one should expect nothing from struggles, competition, agitation, activity, or growth, for they are all just a little brownian motion on the surface, superficial disturbances hiding the incurable erosion of matter, of things, and of the world.

Everything is constant, but in the aleatory and the directional. Venus watches over rebirth, a whim of her springtime desire : the first occurrence of meetings and of collisions. Here and there, yesterday and tomorrow, for the perpetuation of the species. Athens is lost; this city is erased from history; that universe is crumbling; a turbulence starts again, twinkling somewhere in the infinite void, formed in the wink of an eye or clinker­ built. It is born with its own time; elsewhere there are smoking ruins: Troy. The second global vortex, but exploded globally. The dead and the constitutions are distributed and dispersed in a spatiotemporal in­ finity.

Thus, the wise man comes back to natural pacts, beginning at the beginning. Well versed in the temporality of degradation, he knows that the vortices will come undone. Not only the pointless agitation of turbu­ lent men, simple ripples on the water's surface, but also-and especially - things and the world produced from turbulence . All these disturbances return to the original streaming. Born of dust, to dust they return. And it is the same with the soul, my soul, a thing among things. Not only here and now, troubled with anguish and anxiety, with fear and suffering, but born some night from a chance occurrence, a meeting, a collision, an inclination, a disturbance. This morning my soul is tumultuous, con­ vulsive, and tempestuous, but from its birth and in its very being, it is only a troublemaker, a product of a storm in the atomic cloud, of an oblique lightning bolt. It is a taraxia, just like my body, and like things themselves. I know it; the laws of physics tell me so. And I make my revolution. The physics of the vortex is revolutionary. It goes back to the first disturbance, toward the original clinamen. And from there to the streaming, .to the constancies of movements, to general invariabilities, whatever the random variations, to the primordial paths of matter itself, pricked here and there, marked with convulsions. Thus, ataraxia is a physical state, the fundamental state of matter; on this base, worlds are formed, disturbed by circumstances. Morality is physics. Wisdom com­ pletes its revolution, going back up the helix toward this first state of things; ataraxia is the absence of vortices. The soul of the wise man is extended to the global universe. The wise man is the universe. He is, when pacified, the pact itself.

Greek wisdom reaches one of its most important points here, where man is in the world and of the world, in matter and of matter. He is not a stranger in the world but a friend, at home in the world, a fellow voyager, an equal. He has a contract of Venus with things. Many other wisdoms and many other sciences are founded, antithetically, on breaking this contract. Man is a stranger in the world, alienated from the dawn, from the sky, from things. He hates them and fights against them. His environ­ ment is a dangerous enemy who must be fought and who must be kept in servitude. Martial neuroses from Plato to Descartes, from Bacon to us. The hatred of objects at the root of knowledge, the horror of the world at the heart of the theoretical. The universe of Ericurus and Lucretius is a reconciled one in which the science of things and the science of man go hand in hand, in identity. I am a disturbance, a vortex in turbulent nature. I am an ataraxia in a universe in which the heart of being is undisturbed. The wrinkles on my brow are the same as the ripples on the water. And my appeasement is universal.

The crisis temporarily subsides after a sacrificial murder. Iphigenia is put to death, the wind rises up, the Trojan War will take place, a new crisis of violence. Here the war takes place in Athens, atrocious brawls among the funeral pyres. The plague, like the unleashed ocean, like the swelling waters of the river, is a figure of violence. In the sixth book, there is no sacrifice to interrupt the new crisis. No Iphigenia in a plague­ ridden Athens, the priest has fled. Instead of one unimportant funeral pyre, there are a hundred, all afire, one at each crossroads. Have we gained anything in the exchange? In other words, if you suppress vi­ olence, it reappears. Remove its local setting, that is to say, the solution of religious sacrifice, and immediately the global space of the city is plague-ridden with violence. An important question which Lucretius did not avoid, and which perhaps he could not answer and which pushed him to his limits.

Violence is the only problem so poorly resolved that our own culture is, without a doubt, the continuation, through other means, of barbarian­ Ism .

Violence is a major component of the relations among men. It is there, running free, perhaps fatal for us; maybe it is our destiny and our greatest risk, our greatest disequilibrium. Lucretius is well aware of sacrificial purging, and, recognizing the sacrificial solution, sets it aside. He is also aware of the legal solution, which is merely the interpretation of the previous solution by the rationalization of the guilty parties.

The most revolutionary event in the history of mankind and, perhaps, in the evolution of hominids in general was less, it seems to me, the attainment of abstracts orgeneralities in and through language than it was a turningawayfrom the set ofrelations that we have within thefamily, the group, and so on, and that (mly concern us and them, toward an agreement, maybe a confused one, but a sudden and speetfic one, about something exterior to this set. Before this event, there was only the network of relations in which we had been plunged without any other resort. And suddenly, a thing, something, appears outside the network. The messages exchanged no longer say: I, you, he, we, they, and so on, but this, here. Ecce. Here is the thing itself.

As far as we know, the animals that are the most closely related to us, namely, the mammals, communicate among themselves by repeating in a stereotyped fashion the network of their relations. The animal signals or makes known to another animal : I dominate you and I give to you, I am dominated by you, therefore I receive from you. What? That is not important or it is implied within the relation. You are large and strong, I beg from you. Lucretius speaks in this manner of our relation to the gods. Hence, the necessitating condition that forces animals to regulate the set of problems born of these relations within the network itself. There are only contracts, and such is their fate.

The human message, however, even if it often repeats the network of relations among men until it becomes a stereotype, in addition sometimes says something about the thing. If it does not, the message is immediately brought back to the schemas of the political animal, in other words, to the animal alone. Humanization consists of the following message: here is some bread, whoever I am, whoever you are. Hoc est, that is, in the neuter. Neuter for the gender, neutral for war. Paradoxically, there are men or human groups only after the appearance of the object as such. The object as an object, more or less independent from us and more or less invariable in the variation of our relations, separates man from mammals. The political animal, the one who subordinates every object to relations among subjects, is only a mammal among others, a wolf, for example, a wolfamongwolves.Inpurepolitics, thedictumofHobbes, thatmanisawolfto other men, is not a metaphor but the exact index of a regression to the state which precedes the emergence of the object.

The origin of the theater, comedy and tragedy, where it is only a question of human relations and where there IS never an object as such, is as old as the origin of political relations: it is submerged in animality. Politics and theater are merely mammalian.

The discovery of the object as such and, in a global fashion, of the ex­ terior world , if it is not yet the first scientific invention, remains the pre­ liminary condition to any sort of investigation of this type. Moreover, it makes an opening and something like a chance to escape from the network of our relations, and, therefore, to free us from the problems posed by this network, in particular, the problem of violence. What pertains to the object will perhaps be neutral terrain. The prehistory of physics, and of non-violence, given at the same time. The prehistory of hominids. Is an object conceivable outside of relations of force?
Listen now to the lessons of Epicureanism, which boil down to the

following: reduce to a minimum the network of relations in which you are submerged. Live in the garden, a small space, with a few friends. No family, if it is possible, and, in any case, no politics. But especially this. Here is the object, objects, the world, nature, physics. Aphrodite-pleasure is born of the world and the waters. Mars is in the forum and in the armed crowd. Reduce your relations to a minimum and bring your objects to the fore; reduce the intersubjective to a minimum and the objective to a maximum. With your back turned on politics, study physics. Peace through neutrality. Such knowledge brings happiness, or at least the end of our worst pains. Forget the sacred; that means: forget the violence which founds it and forget the religious which links men to each other. Consider the object, objects, nature.

Nevertheless, the plague returns, destroying Athens and bringing vio­ lence and death. Why? Let us return to the object. There are only two objects that constitute everything: atoms and the void. The void, inane, has its root in the Greek verb inein, which means to purge, to expel, or, in the passive, to be chased by a purge . The void is a part of chaos but is also a catharsis. Iphigenia is sacrificed, a purge or catharsis for the petty kings in Greece, but at the end of the sacred dynamics there is the Trojan War and extermination. A passage to the object to be freed from Mars. But the first object is the purge; it is only the physical concept of catharsis. The second object, the atom. The sacred solution begins with a division and separation of space. The temple is a dichotomized spare; the word itself tells us so. Inside is the religious, outside is the profane. A two-valued logic, a two-valued geometry, a two-valued ontology, inside, outside; sacred,profane;matter,void. The word temple is of the same family as atom. The atom is the last or the first temple, and the void is the last or the first purge. The two objects are, in the balance, the physical concepts of catharsis and temple. We return to the network of relations. For having erased the sacrifice of Iphigenia in the temple of Trivia, the local religious event inundates the globe. Atoms in the void, little temples in the great purge. Nature is still another sacrificial substitute. Violence is still-and always-in physics. Thus the atoms-germs sack Athens and the last survivors kill each other. Q.E.D. It is not politics or sociology that is projected on nature, but the sacred. Beneath the sacred, there is violence. Beneath the object, relations reappear.

The question, for us, stays the same: violence is not.only in the use of science but still hides in the unknown of its concepts. Athens generalized, the world after Hiroshima, can still die from the atoms. Where lies the madness of the irrational in our rational?

Today we are discovering the limits of laws, the limits of the realm in which nature can be controlled, that is to say, in which it is indifferent. We are rediscovering this truth, announced a long time ago by Serres and on which Lucrece is a meditation: "Nature does not code the uni­ versal. . . . there is no code at the equilibrium point."30 Everything that exists, all the individual bodies that come into being, coded circumstances, tablets of their own law, do so by distancing themselves from the law without a memory, the law of the dynamic "fall," the stable and infinite interlinking, or the law of evolution toward thermodynamic equilibrium, the forgetting of the specificity of initial states.

A scientific style does not die if the limits of the questions it implies or the specificity of the questions it brings to the fore are uncovered. It remains the witness to a successful dialogue with nature. Serres's work helps us understand that our questions no longer can be asked of a world without friction or holes - the world of Leibniz. After all, our physics was never capable of truly understanding the Leibnizian harmony of the thousands of voices translating each other in a universal code." [Hermes]

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySat Aug 06, 2016 8:25 pm

Lyssa wrote:
Concepts, notions, falsifications, helping things thrive with no reference to reality - the disconnect from the phenomenal world has become so entrenched, there is nothing but simulation left. A dysgenics of pure simulacra. Things like honor and truth - pure simulation… the goddess has departed.

Do you not see?

What concerns me most is that I do not see, because I may have no reference to genuine reality. Only an illusion. (This extends beyond the context of this conversation.)

"To an artificial mind all reality is virtual." (The Animatrix)

"What's real doesn't matter. What's important is how we live our lives." (The Animarix)

Black Panther wrote:
I consider most humans to only partially exist.
In as far as one lets oneself be commanded how to act and prescribed what to value, one is not an entity. Most humans wouldnt know what it is to be an entity; one must be of strong birth to renounce the prescriptions.

A man can still walk the treadmill and forsake its truth in his own time, then he is struggling as a form of strength. And yet he does not escape the sickness.

Only when a man sets his own terms and is able to live by them, is he strong, free, virtuous, worthy of being. Such self-set terms are more often than not cultural choices; for example, the Roman man of culture, to whom being banished would be a fate worse than death. The only solution for such a man would be to conquer the city, merely for the right to inhabit it.

Yet we are bound to live by the terms of the gods' will, in a manner of speaking. We are a product of nature, therefore bound to its inherent limitations... whatever they are. Or, is there a pragmatic limit on what terms a man sets for himself, and those terms he is forced to live by at any given time?

What of the person who runs the treadmill in order to master it, while keenly being aware of the alternative? Or what of those who accomplish more while on the treadmill than the supposed strong men who discount it? Does it not depend on which is valued more? The results, or the method?
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySun Aug 07, 2016 3:05 am

Acryptical wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
Concepts, notions, falsifications, helping things thrive with no reference to reality - the disconnect from the phenomenal world has become so entrenched, there is nothing but simulation left. A dysgenics of pure simulacra. Things like honor and truth - pure simulation… the goddess has departed.

Do you not see?

What concerns me most is that I do not see, because I may have no reference to genuine reality. Only an illusion. (This extends beyond the context of this conversation.)

"To an artificial mind all reality is virtual." (The Animatrix)

"What's real doesn't matter. What's important is how we live our lives." (The Animarix)



Did The Force send you here, young Jedi? Wink

The need for an impossible absolute certainty is already a dis/ease. And finding no safe crutch, conserves energy by relapsing into pain/pleasure as the simplistic means of surviving day to day.
This kind of self-retardation into hedonism is existing, not living.

So, how do you live your life when you are indifferent about what is real or unreal, that, in the real unprotected world could spell death or worse, for you?

Some news:

Satyr wrote:
"What must be defined here is nature, versus human environments.

One must adapt to nature, or die.
Nature is dynamic.

Man imposes an order forcing other men to adapt.

Different adaptive strategies and motives.
One is an admission of humility before what makes him possible - no resentiment - the other is an admission of weakness in relation to other men; a humility before men."


The eugenic molding of the individual's mind has already taken place before it has reached the age of maturity.
Education, training, peer pressures, pop culture, institutionalization, regimentation, Pavlovian methods of manipulating spontaneous reactions, have all shaped the individual's mind before it can even begin to think on its own.
It never does.
The adaptive process for such an individual, is about applying what it has been given as indubitable truths and principles, measuring its own performance in accordance to the values standards it has adopted as the only sane ones.

It no longer needs to adapt, because the world, as it can perceive it (the artificial world of man) is adjusting itself, in relation to the world outside, and telling this mind what to do and how to act, to facilitate this process.
The individual begins to believe that the world rotates around its needs, because the way to satisfy them is given, it is a given.

This decrease in stress/anxiety (fear), is accompanied by a steady stream of it. The mind exists in a perpetual state of stress that never rises to anxiety - except in some cases, for various reasons, and quickly medicated and intervened upon - and rarely to fear.
Fear becomes the dirty word, only the system can impose upon the mind.
Nobody is permitted to live in fear of another man...all fear is the monopoly of the system.
Disrespect for man...because respect is founded on anxiety/fear, and all that respect channeled to the institution, with specific individuals, chosen for the task, becoming representations of it - power through proxy.

The steady rate of anxiety/fear has two utilities:

1- It maintains a steady state of activity, work, labor, so that atrophy does not occur in the areas deemed important to the institution's health.

2- It reduces the tolerance levels (strength) of the psyche's habituate to this steady state, but inexperienced with any state above it.
This makes any slight increase in anxiety/fear all the more effective.


Values are dependent on standards.
The environment determines the standards.
Changing environments can result in changing standards.

The most vacillating brain is the Modern brain:
Shallow, weak-willed, cowardly... adapting to any slight change, altering its values with the slightest discomfort.
It is, in fact, proud of its own malleability... and considers itself open-minded, enlightened, progressive, because of it.
It's weak-will, superficial awareness, stupidity, retarded psychology, feminine disposition, is twisted into a positive attribute, simply by changing the words, and the reasons.... in true nihilistic form.

As need/suffering decreases the quality of the values decreases proportionally.

No experience with need/suffering, means no contact with the organism's own essence, as a non-absolute, striving towards an object/objective.
It constitutes a partial, never completed, detachment form existence - a form of numbness which imitates indifference by never having to go through the prerequisite stages of empowerment and adaptation.
The brain is thrust into a fabricated, externally guaranteed, state of immediate gratification...and there it wallows like a pig in the mud. It's sensation of independence, from its past, from nature, is an artificially produced form of dependence. It never attains it, or any level of it, because it has a "right" to it...for an undisclosed price.

The brain, finding itself in a sheltering, ordered, protective, system, not of its own doing, becomes arrogant, demanding, with a false sense of entitlement.
It wrongly assumes that the order present is a reflection of its own order, its own power.
Values becomes trivial, ephemeral, they lose relevant, severity...they become a joke.
Cynicism ensues."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyMon Aug 08, 2016 4:53 pm

Lyssa wrote:
Did The Force send you here, young Jedi? Wink

The Force brought me here no more than gravity, electromagnetism, or chi.

Lyssa wrote:
The need for an impossible absolute certainty is already a dis/ease. And finding no safe crutch, conserves energy by relapsing into pain/pleasure as the simplistic means of surviving day to day.
This kind of self-retardation into hedonism is existing, not living.

So, how do you live your life when you are indifferent about what is real or unreal, that, in the real unprotected world could spell death or worse, for you?

I can only speculate, though I myself am not indifferent about what is real or unreal--to a point. Some things I can discern as real easily enough. Others, I'm not sure about. Most of what I'm unsure of has little bearing on how I live by life day to day, so I don't revere it.

Like a clod of dirt. No one would be so foolish as to say the clod of dirt is useless or unimportant in the grand scheme of things... because it's easy to imagine what would happen if dirt all together didn't exist. It is of great importance. Nevertheless, we don't build shrines to clods of dirt.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyThu Aug 11, 2016 2:48 pm

Black Panther wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Quote :
If the "first step" is to take the bull by the horns, its a call for a Theseus, a Wagner, a barbaric-romantic hero.

If it is to ride and direct the bull away into dharma, its a call for a Dionysos, an Achilles, a plutonic-excess hero, where the arena itself has to be widened, the context made pro-found with higher aims, the bull becomes small...
The pic. is marked under Saggitarius, the Archer-Direc-Taur of Jupiterian Excess

What follows is the sensual becomes elevated over the sexual, the beautiful stage of the Greeks.   Hebe is replaced by Ganymede, a male center of gravity.

Its well phrased, to take the sexual by the horns;
to create a hero out of the sexual
-
the character is first purely sexual but in an ordeal turns more refined, and stronger, and a new violence emerges as character;

such a hero can not live without a heart that is named in such terms as Dionysos or Poseidon Earthshaker - or Zeus Cloudgatherer - gods that tear open and enlarge the world, lightning and stormgods, and chtonic monsters of the soul that devour morality, all these are welcome in the life of the hero. The antiFaust; one simply weighs ones soul in gold and take the deal; to become what one is, is to sell ones soul to life itself. This is what the Greeks did, their profound superficiality, their uncompromising being by virtue of it not even being deep enough to compromise; one either is, or isn't; and this is how it should be, or how happiness is made. This is what Heraclitus means with fire, why fire is character and fate, and why it devours that waters of Thales to return being to the cauldron of timeless oblivion after all the goods are spent. The planetary system is the ecstatically whirling circumference of orgiastic wastefulness that is the foundation of all temporal being, that is to say of all becoming; against the backdrop of infinite possibility, spendthrift is the only path to substance, and substance is like the crown of a Geisir.


""Thus, the din and terror of the god [Dionysus], though clothed in orgy, madness, and murder reveal, on the other side of that terror, the quiet and enraptured soul of a lover.  In a note for Zarathustra Nietzsche writes: "Sexual love as a means toward an ideal (Striving to go down in one's opposite.)  Love for the suffering godhead.  To transform the figure of death as a means of victory and triumph."" - [To Nietzsche: Dionysus, I Love You! Ariadne - Claudia Crawford]
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyFri Aug 12, 2016 3:18 pm

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Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySat Nov 05, 2016 3:54 pm

Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySun Nov 06, 2016 2:54 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySun Nov 06, 2016 11:04 pm

Lyssa wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

I was getting more at the power of Shakespeare's "giant hand"... But to go back, do you think the dragon sparkling with wit and malice is ideal, or the ideal state of Dionysus?
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyMon Nov 07, 2016 2:53 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:
perpetualburn wrote:
Lyssa wrote:

Nietzsche wrote:
"I sparkled like a dragon with wit and malice."

— June 28, 1888: Letter to Reinhart von Seydlitz.

"Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore" - Keats


In context;

Keats wrote:
"How finely is the brief of Lear sketched in this conference [Goneril and Regan’s discussion of Lear’s rejection of Cordelia] – from this point does Shakespeare spur him out to the mighty grapple – ‘the seeded pride that hath to his maturity blowne up’ Shakespeare doth scatter abroad on the winds of Passion, where the germs take buoyant root in stormy Air, suck up lightning sap, and become voiced dragons—self will and pride and wrath are taken at a rebound by his giant hand and mounted to the Clouds—there to remain and thunder evermore…" [Marginalia on King Lear]

Keats even wrote a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] on this, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] by the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and the Scythian weight of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] is more the Saturnine serpent, "lead-en deaden knowledge" of the senile fool and the inevitability of hoarding love, that turns to poison, than the heroic-criminality of the Venus aspect, and in the negative, its smothering love, as in the case of Adonis.

I was getting more at the power of Shakespeare's "giant hand"... But to go back, do you think the dragon sparkling with wit and malice is ideal, or the ideal state of Dionysus?


…for the others who may have been unaware of the full context.

To your question, I should think its the former, since what is Dionysos itself, is an un-ending abyss of reality. And without being the former ideal ('a' dragon), one doesnt get to know the latter ideal ('the' dragon).

See the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to Reinhart, and note 4. in it, reg. the 'monster' and Goethe.
(Goethe's line is reminiscent of Lear and the Fool in the Storm, exactly in the opp. sense of Faust's…]

And;

Nietzsche wrote:
"I concede only that cruelty now refines itself and that its older forms henceforth offend taste; but wounding and torturing with word and eye reaches its highest cultivation in times of corruption - it is now alone that malice and the delight in malice are born. People who live in an age of corruption are witty and slanderous; they know that there are other kinds of murder than by dagger or assault; they also know that whatever is well said is believed." [JW, 23]

Quote :
"The tree needs storms, doubts, worms, and malice in order to reveal the nature and strength of its sprout; may it break if it is not strong enough!" [JW, 106]

Nietzsche wrote:
My Roses

"Yes! My joy - it wants to gladden - ,
every joy wants so to gladden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?

You must crouch on narrow ledges,
prop yourselfon ropes and wedges,
prick yourself on thorny hedges!

For my joy - it loves to madden!
For my joy - is malice laden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?" [JW, Joke, Cunning, and Revenge, 9]

Nietzsche wrote:
"I am not supposing that something like human malice and perfidy - in short, the bad wild beast in us - is thereby disguised; my thought is, quite on the contrary, that it is precisely as tame animals that are we a disgraceful sight and need the disguise of morality, - that the 'inner man' in Europe is not nearly evil enough to be able to 'show himself' that way (and be beautiful that way - ). The European disguises himself with morality because he has become a sick, sickly, maimed animal which has good reasons for being 'tame'; because he is almost a monstrosity, something half, weak, awkward…" [JW, 352]


Its interesting in his mad letter on his being various incarnations, he doesn't say Shakespeare, but the poet of Shakespeare - Lord Bacon; I wonder why?

I think Lampert may have an answer, but I haven't read his book on Bacon yet.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySat Jan 14, 2017 5:01 pm

Lyssa wrote:


To your question, I should think its the former, since what is Dionysos itself, is an un-ending abyss of reality. And without being the former ideal ('a' dragon), one doesnt get to know the latter ideal ('the' dragon).


See the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] to Reinhart, and note 4. in it, reg. the 'monster' and Goethe.
(Goethe's line is reminiscent of Lear and the Fool in the Storm, exactly in the opp. sense of Faust's…]

And;

Nietzsche wrote:
"I concede only that cruelty now refines itself and that its older forms henceforth offend taste; but wounding and torturing with word and eye reaches its highest cultivation in times of corruption - it is now alone that malice and the delight in malice are born. People who live in an age of corruption are witty and slanderous; they know that there are other kinds of murder than by dagger or assault; they also know that whatever is well said is believed." [JW, 23]

Quote :
"The tree needs storms, doubts, worms, and malice in order to reveal the nature and strength of its sprout; may it break if it is not strong enough!" [JW, 106]

Nietzsche wrote:
My Roses

"Yes! My joy - it wants to gladden - ,
every joy wants so to gladden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?

You must crouch on narrow ledges,
prop yourselfon ropes and wedges,
prick yourself on thorny hedges!

For my joy - it loves to madden!
For my joy - is malice laden!
Would you pluck my rose and sadden?" [JW, Joke, Cunning, and Revenge, 9]

Nietzsche wrote:
"I am not supposing that something like human malice and perfidy - in short, the bad wild beast in us - is thereby disguised; my thought is, quite on the contrary, that it is precisely as tame animals that are we a disgraceful sight and need the disguise of morality, - that the 'inner man' in Europe is not nearly evil enough to be able to 'show himself' that way (and be beautiful that way - ). The European disguises himself with morality because he has become a sick, sickly, maimed animal which has good reasons for being 'tame'; because he is almost a monstrosity, something half, weak, awkward…" [JW, 352]


Where is the malice here though:

"He hath subdued monsters, he hath solved enigmas. But he should also redeem his monsters and enigmas; into heavenly children should he transform them.

As yet hath his knowledge not learned to smile, and to be without jealousy; as yet hath his gushing passion not become calm in beauty."

Dionysus at his most monstrous and terrifying isn't calm, even if you might say that it's still beautiful (in a terrible glorious sort of way). It's just too intense. It might bring about the calmer beauty though. Is a lion more beautiful when it's attacking or reposed? Isn't it full of pride either way?

"Its interesting in his mad letter on his being various incarnations, he doesn't say Shakespeare, but the poet of Shakespeare - Lord Bacon; I wonder why?"

Shakespeare as a mask of Bacon, Shakespeare as a mask of Nietzsche? It's more interesting to me that Nietzsche never mentions let alone remarks on the Sonnets which are more important than any single play.
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptySun Jan 15, 2017 1:14 pm

perpetualburn wrote:
Where is the malice here though:

"He hath subdued monsters, he hath solved enigmas. But he should also redeem his monsters and enigmas; into heavenly children should he transform them.

As yet hath his knowledge not learned to smile, and to be without jealousy; as yet hath his gushing passion not become calm in beauty."

Dionysus at his most monstrous and terrifying isn't calm, even if you might say that it's still beautiful (in a terrible glorious sort of way).  It's just too intense.  It might bring about the calmer beauty though.  Is a lion more beautiful when it's attacking or reposed?  Isn't it full of pride either way?

The calm you are looking for is evident in the way Euripides presences Dionysos - a kind of mad, indestructible-come-what-may self-surity. His whole play is extra-ordinary around that element of calm.

In the passage you quote however, I think N. is speaking of sublimating Apollo. An individual who doesnt become conscious of how far he's come, and continues to prove and prove, will seek proof forever and generates a vibe of insufficiency unto himself; it'll stick to him. 0.85838484 has to be "rounded off" into 1. To allow oneself to turn all sharp sparks into a wholesome sun, a heat to a "light", a "leap", a god-"like" feeling, without jealously comparing what the other is achieving, feeling small before how much more is left that one still hasn't done - such greed can engulf one in envy and inevitably always feeling weak and conscious Only of his insufficiency before the enormity of life..  is a malicious delight. There has to be lust, not greed. One has to see, every challenge overcome is in its way a whole sequence of events.. a chain of life, and so 'abs.' in that poetic sense. To say the agitate passion must become clearer and calm in effortless-ease.. is to re-Cognize oneself equal to the same ease with which life meets one in a myriad forms - as luck, as fate, as challenge, as failure, as deceit, as triumph… One must come to attain that equi-poise of mind or what the ancints called [and Stoics distorted] as Ataraxia. "Imperturbation".
Such a calm, that stands there like strength slaying all doubts and impelling action, confidence… what else is "god"?
A smile, a calm that calms doubts in another and increases strength to t(h)rust in life evermore, in a desert of nothingness it Is.
The words grandeur and majesty literally mean state-liness. It alludes to something of the illusion of Smooth running harmonie of creation… a magic of effortless ease,, a no-sweat august bearing…

Thus, in the JW somewhere, he says;

Nietzche wrote:
"On meeting again.- A.: Do I still understand you right? You are searching? Where is your corner and star within the real world? Where can you lie down in the sun so that an abundance of well-being comes to you, too, and your existence justifies itself? Let everyone do that for himself- you seem to me to be saying- and let everyone put out of his mind generalities, and worries about others and about society!

B.: I want more than that; I am no seeker. I want to create for myself a sun of my own."

Its not enough to conquer dragons, but to get them to work for you willingly… like magic, create a smooth functioning universe out of them… so they dont stand there like "conquered objects and slaves", showing the victory of force/might, but to create something dignified of it all.

The hero only stands there with a spear - an air of threat and threatened;
the super-hero - is that original pic. N. visualized in the BOT - the bacchanalia where everything stands as though reconciled into a whole…

Nietzsche wrote:
"The noble caste was from the beginning always the barbarian caste: their superiority lay, not in their physical strength, but primarily in their psychical-they were more complete human beings (which, on every level, also means as much as 'more complete beasts')." [BGE, 257]

The calm of the lion is different from the calm of the child.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Satanic Freedom Satanic Freedom - Page 3 EmptyMon Jul 09, 2018 9:31 pm

Satanism is just as Abrahamic as Christianity. Modern 'atheism' is Abrahamic soul-egalitarianism without the humility of spiritual submission, making them imagine they're their own special sort of 'superior' because their minds can hold a secret another supposedly can't know, no matter how immaterial it is. Distinction (to them) is its own justification; an absurdity and Abrahamic-Satanic.
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