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PostSubject: The living dead Sun Aug 21, 2011 3:36 pm

I think of myself as very hyper and full of life comparatively. For me, I am always being dragged down. I feel like a spark waiting to ignite wherever I go. I see people getting along, doing the same things, always going to the same places and partaking in the same activities and my teeth grind. I want excitement, heated conversation; not what was on tv last night...


Sometimes I wish it would just dissipate so that I could finally fit in and be at ease. In fact, fitting in is what I envy the most. But then I instantly snap out of it, and feel like me again- it's inevitable.

All my life I've held my tongue, and watched... And the rare occasions I express myself I tend to explode and detract...

People can't handle controversy. They can play sports, and dance- but don't dare say anything that might offend them.

The motto of modernity is to 'just do it'...

Don't have thoughts, and at any cost, whatever you do, never display them in public.









How much longer?

When will they realize that the real revolution starts with using their minds....
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:27 pm

My dear postmodern society is all about social conformity.

If it's life beyond social conformity your looking for you will never find it in general accepted public society.

All you will find is drone like automotons who are social zombies working their eight to five partaking in socially conforming mundane activities afterwards when their not working cycling back and fourth.



Last edited by TheJoker on Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:31 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:29 pm

Things will change.

Soon.

There is no doubt.





People just don't want it to.
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:30 pm

Poison IV wrote:
Things will change.

Soon.

There is no doubt.





People just don't want it to.

Things will change because global anarchy is on the way sweet thing.

The great international or global economical bubble is about to rip apart very soon.

This is why I am waiting patiently in the shadows because the time is near and at hand.

When it happens I'm going to have me some fun like I have never had before. Twisted Evil

I've got a vendetta of revenge or retribution to act upon and I will have me some personal satisfaction.
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Jun 03, 2012 3:36 pm

Lamentation.


Azah:

"[One] participates in the meanings of being a Muslim through ritual action, not merely through a profession of faith."[21] Pounding the chest uses the body as a percussion instrument. Thomas Lyell reported that when he visited Iraq during Muharram in the quiet of the desert night he could hear men pounding their chests three miles away.[22] The rhythmic pounding and subsequent movements of the body create a trance of sorts that transports the participant into an altered state of consciousness. This is not a trance during which a person stares blankly into space, but rather the prayer itself becomes embodied. The acoustic characteristic of the chest pounding allows the ritual to unfold through physical exertion that enables the body to relax. Whether the trance is triggered by the voice chanting the lament or the chest being pounded, the animation transports the body into another realm or a shared realm where the participant is in two places at once.
The body of the community and how it “moves” is an essential aspect of the ritual as a collective response to emotion. The azah ritual unites the participants through body prayer and bonds them physically and spiritually.

The participants interact through eye contact, chant, movement and touch creating a sense of togetherness where one feels like she can “rest in the arms of Allah,” and tears are shed without shame. Tom Driver refers to the expression of this emotion as aggressive love. It is love that fiercely moves toward others and becomes the desire for intimacy because “ritual often provides space and freedom for loving aggression within a group, while at the same time lifting up visions and symbols of universal love.”[28] Based on love, the tears that flow during the azah ritual wash away the sorrow of all women that participate, enabling them to shape culture and history and to posit themselves as creators of the next generation."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Jun 03, 2012 3:37 pm

Greece: The relationship between epic and lament.

"Epic and lament both tell the story of dead individuals, but to very different ends. Epic, like the (traditional Greek) male funeral oration and after-feast elegiac poetry, tends to celebrate death as meaningful, and most of all, does not dwell upon the suffering of all concerned:
In "praising the hero at common meals--the purpose is to educate and exhort, and to celebrate the state. It is a patriotic and political ceremony" (Alexiou, 128).

"The male funeral oration for those who die in battle makes a virtue of death, provided it is death in service to the state.
This is in direct opposition to the lament of the female relatives, who, if we are to take the folk laments of Greece and other modern cultures as representative, mourn their personal loss in terms of emotional, economic, and social deprivation, and look upon death as the enemy. The tension between public and private burial can only be resolved when the state... convinces the families, particularly the mothers of soldiers, that the glory of dying for the fatherland outweighs private grief, and compensates them for their loss" (Holst-Warhaft, 5).

To the rising village middle class, or to those who have fled the village altogether
for the city, a mother or grandmother who still laments for the dead constitutes an embarrassing admission of primitivism" (Caraveli-Chaves, 130).

Lament is not done by isolated individuals, but by community members together.
In 1974, Margaret Alexiou wrote: "In most villages, lamentation remains a social duty for the whole community, to be performed for all alike. The bereaved family is not asked if it wishes for the dead to be lamented; the women simply come to the house and weep, first for whoever has died, then for their own dead" (Alexiou, 50).
"The purpose of ritual lamentation is a collective tribute to the dead from the whole community" (Alexiou, 44).

The passion of lament is evidently potentially highly contagious.
"The function of the invocation at the tomb is for the living, by their offerings and passionate observations, to enter into communion with the dead" (Alexiou, 46).
Lament is a "magic incantation designed to bring the dead back to life" (Alexiou, 134).

According to the public authorities, "A hero's death, it seems, should be marked by praise, not women's cries, that may 'wake the dead.' If their cries have such power, women must be capable of some direct communication with the dead.

There is an "underlying fear of laments as magic songs, songs which open up perilous channels of communication between the living and the dead" (Caraveli-Chaves, 130).

"Such a dialogue with the dead places a certain power in the hands of women... In a patriarchal society where women are consistently undervalued, lament gives women, who, both as child-bearers and mid-wives already have a certain control over birth, potential authority over the rites of death" (Holst-Warhaft, 3).

"It is woman's capacity for reproduction that also gives her firsthand access to the realm of the dead" (Caraveli-Chaves, 146).

"Laments bridge and mediate between vital realms of existence: life and death, the physical and he metaphysical, present and past, temporal and mythic time. The lamenter becomes the medium through whom the dead speaks to the living, the shaman who leads the living to the underworld and back, thus effecting a communal confrontation with death and, through it, a catharsis" (Caraveli-Chaves, 144).

"Men's power is restricted to the public, visible, and official realm.
Though it provides them with opportunities for social domination, it limits them to a temporal sphere of experience. Women dominate the rituals connected to the life cycle as well as irregular, secret rites such as magic and witchcraft. As midwives, matchmakers, singers
of bridal songs, and finally, as lamenters, they dominate the rites of passage, the perilous moments of transition from one realm to another. Such segregated domains of male and female activities render men socially but not culturally dominant, and establish a
complex network of balances within the community" (Caraveli-Chaves, 143).

"Open wounds, the open female mouth that screams and improvises moiroloi (songs of fate), and metaphors of birthing, form a symbolic continuum, the official cartography of the female body. These are thresholds, limens, points of entry and exit where the outside and the inside--fate, truth, and the social order--meet in disordering contact.

The presence of moira (fate) intensifies when the orificial imagery and functions of the female body intensify. In everyday social life, men associate this process with the polluting ambiance of the feminine." (Seremetakis, 121).

"The vocality of women, the signs of dreaming and warning, the signs of death itself, are wild. They come from the outside, and they are intrusive and transgressive. They must be subjected to domestication through silencing or low voicing" (Seremetakis, 57).

"Some mourning women have even gone to the extreme of leaving their homes in the city, and living for a year at the graves of the dead"
(Alexiou, 33).

"The main effects of lamentation on the women of 'patriarchal' Greek village society are the establishment of a strong sense of bonding among them, and the reinforcement of social roles and modes of interaction which can best serve as strategies for survival (Caraveli-Chaves, 130).

Female lament enables "bonding through shared suffering"
(Caraveli-Chaves, 146).

"In Finland, China, and Greece, laments are sung by the bride's family,
and often by the bride herself, as she leaves to become a member
of her husband's household" (Holst-Warhaft, 1).
"Lives of women acquire meaning through the maintenance of
social relationships with other members of their families"
(Danforth, 138).

"Because of the marginal position of women in rural Greek society,
women are much more threatened by the death of a significant
other than men are" (Danforth, 138).

"Because a woman's identity depends greatly on her relationship
to a man, the death of this man deprives her of the crucial component
of her identity" (Danforth, 138).

"Because of the loss of social status and the virtual social isolation
plaguing the widow in the patriarchal milieu of traditional Greek villages,
widowhood is used in poetry as a synonym for death--in fact, as an
alternate form of death itself--a living death, as it were" (Caraveli-Chaves, 137).
"For these reasons, it is necessary for a woman to maintain the social
relationships she enjoyed with the deceased" (Danforth, 138).

"The song becomes a universal lamentation for all women within
the same world view, bewailing woman's hard lot and celebrating
the creative skills through which one can transcend this lot,
survive in it, or compensate for it" (Caraveli-Chaves, 146).


"It is ponos (plural, poni: pain, grief, suffering, sorrow) that maintains
the religious perspective toward death and enables the conversation
with the dead to continue" (Danforth, 141).

Lament involves the expression of irrational feelings in order "to effect some control over the disturbing and incomprehensible process of death" (Alexiou, 128). In lament, Death is integrated into community life through ritual; in modern culture, Death is feared as impure and so is kept at a distance (Holst-Warhaft, 9).

"Men and women may both weep for their dead, but it is women who tend to weep longer and louder, and it is they who are thought to communicate directly with the dead through their wailing songs. Frequently, in these cultures, laments are led or sung by a skilled, even professional class of women who are regarded as being especially gifted at improvising and performing songs for the dead" (Holst-Warhaft, 1).

"Men and women both weep in these societies, but it is women who seem to be able to turn weeping into a controlled, often contemplative lament: 'tears become ideas,' as Steven Feld puts it" (Holst-Warhaft, 20).

In many cultures, men's weeping tends to be inarticulate and violent.
Women's weeping, on the other hand, is in many cultures transmuted
into prolonged improvised singing (Holst-Warhaft, 21).

"The indigenous theory of catharsis is that in spite of the desirability of immersing oneself fully in the emotions of pain, grief, and sorrow, the ultimate goal is to rid oneself of these emotions through their repeated expression" (Danforth, 144).

"The ritual formality of the men, who enter in procession usually from the right with their right arm raised in a uniform gesture, contrasts sharply with the wild ecstasy of the women who stand around the bier in varying attitudes and postures" (Alexiou, 6).

In the olden days, "Since each movement was determined by
a pattern of ritual, frequently accompanied by the shrill music
of the aulos [reed pipe], the scene resembled a dance, sometimes
slow and solemn, sometimes wild and ecstatic" (Alexiou, 6).

Screams are seen as punctuations, not interruptions (Seremetakis, 117).

A famous couplet from a lament:
"'Ah mother, keeper of the home and mistress of embroidery,
You knew how to embroider the sky with all its stars.'"
(Alexandra Pateraki) (Caraveli-Chaves, 133).

Laments invoke the dead to rise again (Alexiou, 109).
The dead are praised and reproached--all is seemingly designed
to provoke the dead to respond. (Alexiou, 182)

Lamenters are also often "possessors of secret charms and miraculous potions" (Caraveli-Chaves, 145).

"Lament language is magical language seeking to remedy death and heal the living. By commemorating the past life of the dead person and using the community as a witness, poetic language is utilized as a weapon against death and as a vehicle for ensuring immortality for community members. Moreover, kinship ties are thus affirmed and the continuity of generations is ensured" (Caraveli-Chaves, 151)."

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Sun Jun 03, 2012 3:40 pm

"Dead in the Water: A Floating Cemetery for Hong Kong

BY Suzanne LaBarreTue Jun 1, 2010
A concept building gives a whole new meaning to burial at sea.

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A concept building in Hong Kong by the designer Tin Shun But gives a whole new meaning to burial at sea. Instead of tossing ashes into the great blue yonder, you can stow them on a floating columbarium moored to the main land. Think of it as a cruise ship, of sorts, but for permanent vacationers.

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It sounds absurd, until you realize how difficult it is to find a place in Hong Kong to spend eternity. In a city that packs more than 7 million residents into less than 500 square miles, burial grounds are in hot demand, with private cemetery spaces going for $280,000HKD (about $36,000 USD) and families waiting up to 56 months for a reused plot in a public burial site, according to Bloomberg. Demand far outstrips supply, and as a result, the vast majority of bodes are cremated. The city expects some 400,000 new urns in the next decade.

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Just finding space for all those ashes is geographically fraught. Hong Kong is firmly rooted in Buddhist traditions, and showing dead ancestors proper respect is a powerful cultural imperative -- that includes grade-A resting places. (Views of other graveyards, bad; views of nature, good.) Apparently, a debate is raging over whether to build the city a multi-story columbarium or develop the land for mortal endeavors.

The problem is hardly confined to Hong Kong. From New York to Singapore, cemeteries are filling to the brim, forcing regions to adopt curious burial rituals: exhumations, grave-sharing, etc. In eco-conscious Sweden, it's now legal to freeze bodies in liquid nitrogen, then shatter them. (This is supposedly gentler on the environment than burning bodies, if somewhat disturbing to family members.)

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Hong Kong has considered other options. Last year, as Bloomberg reported, city officials dropped by a colombarium outside Tokyo where families swipe a smart card to access ashes from an underground vault, turning the somber act of remembrance into something like an ATM withdrawal. Visitors can bring flowers and tchotchkes if they want, but they have to remove them as soon as they leave. And if they're too lazy to make the trip, they can always pray in front of an image of the urn online.

So Tin Shun But's idea is pretty damned smart. From the harbor, visitors pull up to the columbarium by boat, then set the ashes in a designated niche or sprinkle them overboard into the murky depths. Seascape at every turn provides a picturesque environment in which to pay respects and a fitting cosmic tribute to those who've shuffled off this mortal coil. The harborside location doesn't get in the way of urban development plans.

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We imagine some people might balk at the impermanence of it all. What's to say a storm doesn't hurl a monster wave on deck, washing dear granny into the sea? It's possible. Maybe even probable. But burial grounds themselves are subject to the vagaries of weather, vandalism, and time. Just look to the tombs of ancient Egypt, or even of modern New Orleans. Hardly anyone rests in peace forever."
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Tue Jun 05, 2012 8:10 pm

"So also among the Slavic peasantry of Russia, the hearth fire was regarded as a symbol of the continuity of the family. No fire would be lit in a house, except from the embers brought from the old household, and should a house change hands, the old fire which burned must perforce be extinguished as the outgoing occupants left, so that the incoming family might set its own fire on the new hearth. The Russian peasant even conceptualized the hearth fire as an ancestral spirit in itself, calling it "little grandfather", in the same way that singular terms are frequently used to designate what may formerly have been thought of collectively as representing all the ancestral "grandfathers", great grandfathers, and ancestral forebears into the mists of time past. When moving house, the fire from the old hearth was reverenly raked into a jar that was carried along with the other possessions to the new home. There it was emptied out onto the new hearth, the embers were revived, and the first flame to show itself was saluted with the words "welcome Grandfather". Like other Indo-European
peoples, pre-Christian Russians, Prussians and Lithuanians kept the sacred hearth fire burning constantly, necer allowing it to become extinguished, for fear that this might augur the extinction of the family." [J.W.Jamieson, The Links Between Fire and Ancestor Worship: A
Speculative Essay, Mankind Quarterly; Mar79, Vol. 19, Issue 3.]



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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:18 pm

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Sex toy technology is[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], but even the most sophisticated teledildonics has not solved the problem of how to properly memorialize one’s deceased sex partner while masturbating. That’s where artist Mark Sturkenboom comes in: He’s created a blown-glass dildo [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].


The dildo is part of an art piece called “21 Grams” [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], and it can hold up to 21 grams of ashes. There’s a gold urn within the translucent shaft, so the ashes won’t slosh around. It’s actually quite classy looking.
Discredited pseudoscience and Alejandro González Iñárritu suggest that 21 grams is the weight of a human soul, so the sex toy effectively gives people a way to simulate a Ghost pottery scene situation, except Whoopi Goldberg is a dildo.


The idea of bonking oneself with a container that holds the remains of one who once bonked you is definitely a little outré, but the artist’s rationale is sweet. Talking to Dezeen, Sturkenboom described how he wanted to point out taboos[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].


Quote :
The idea for 21 Grams, which is handmade to order and can be personalised to the requirements of the customer, grew from his relationship with an elderly widow.


He just wants grieving widows to be happy! By achieving greater Onanistic pleasure with the knowledge that the now-non-sentient organic remnants of their loved ones are technically inside of them! As far as art pieces that incorporate sex toys into an exploration of mortality go, this one’s on the heart-warming side.


Sturkenboom first came up with the project idea back in 2012, and he hand-makes and customizes the classy sadness dildos. He’s only sold one so far but says that there’s renewed interest after showing it off this week.
No word yet on whether there’s a Grief Fleshlight in the works.


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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:20 pm

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: The living dead Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:41 am

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[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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