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apaosha
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PostSubject: Martial Arts Mon Aug 24, 2009 5:45 pm

Post here is you're into a martial art; any one.

Mine is Kendo:

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The screaming is "kiai", which is done to show the strength or "spirit" behind a strike.

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The people in the second video make up the Irish national team, some of which are members of my club and teach me.
The gym about half way through is where I train.

Practice is done with a Bokken, a wooden sword, or alternately with a shinai, a sword made out of bamboo strips lashed together.

It is quite physically demanding.

Previously I went to Aikido and Tae Kwon Do clubs, but I've found that using a weapon is more satisfying.

A bokken:
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And a shinai:
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Anybody else practise a martial art?
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apaosha
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Mon Aug 24, 2009 5:49 pm

Recently I have purchased the requisite costume for Kendo.

The Hakama (trousers) and Keikogi (jacket).

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They are quite comfortable but very complicated to put on; especially the Hakama.

There are strings at the front and back of the hakama which must me looped around the waist twice and tied in a bow.

Fun, though.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Mon Aug 24, 2009 7:21 pm

There is a school of thought that claims that the original martial art was pankration...a style found amongst the Greeks and that was part of their Olympiad.

It is akin to modern Mixed Martial Arts.

Some claim that the eastern cultures invented their martial arts after first contact with pankration via Alexander the Great.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Mon Aug 24, 2009 7:55 pm

apaosha wrote:
Anybody else practise a martial art?
I did manage a couple of classes of Kendo several years ago when I was looking for a sport/hobby. I think it was the price of the equipment which put me off then. I was going to look into fencing but never got round to it.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Tue Aug 25, 2009 6:59 am

Pancreatic fighting? Hmm ...

Abdul Alhazred wrote:
I think it was the price of the equipment which put me off then.

Yes, this is true.

For example, the above costume was €80. A shinai €40. The suit of armour itself is €400.

Luckily I got a free bokken when I joined ...

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Sep 12, 2009 4:27 pm

In the past few weeks my instructors have been competing in the WKC (World Kendo Championships) held in Sao Paulo.

This channel: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] ... has various videos showing their matches should you be curious.

The teams performance was ... unexceptional.

Very disappointed, all in all.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Sep 26, 2009 1:20 pm

Soon I will be getting the Bogu, the set of armour for Kendo.

It consists of a Men (helmet), Do (breastplate), Tare (thigh protection) and Kote (gloves).

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:26 am

My man BT keepin' it real with the Internal Chinese Martial Arts:




Wanderer wrote:
There is a school of thought that claims that the original martial art was pancreatic fighting...a style found amongst the Greeks and that was part of their Olympiad.

It is akin to modern Mixed Martial Arts.

Some claim that the eastern cultures invented their martial arts after first contact with pancreatic fighting via Alexander the Great.

I always found that theory to be non-sensicle in so many ways. Pankration is a combative sport, where military fighting methods are stripped down for use in competition [Like most combative sports]. So, the idea of it being the original fighting art and being transferred to Asian nations doesn't make much sense. As long as their have been people there has been fighting and as long as their has been fighting there has been fighting methods.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:18 pm

Hello, I had studdied Isshin Ryu Karate for a number of years but stoped due to back problems, fully intending to start again. It doesn't seem likely that at my age I will get back to more than a few Katas. I receintly read a book 'Barefoot Zen' in which the author examines various styles of Karate, tracing different tenhniques back to the origins of Kung Fu at the Shaolin Temple. His main theme is that the original techniques were not intended for combat, but strictly for physical conditioning, and sited the practice of 'Pushing Hands' as the true purpose of the teachings. He contends that they were later addapted to physical control of an opponent without actually hitting them. For a little over a year I lived next to a person who worked in law inforcement and who taught Police Officers techniques to control uncooperative suspects or criminals being arrested. On examining the, book stated that many of the techniques in the book were exactly what he taught. At the end of the book the author seemed to contradict himself with accounts of Monks who took up arms to defend their territory against invading armys, I thought if the techniques were noncombat where did the warrior monks come from? Still it was an interesting book.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Aug 20, 2011 1:19 pm

My martial art is called dirty fighting in which case I'll pick up the nearest blunt object and beat you senselessly with it.

I'm the type of guy that had I lived in the wild west of 1800's America I would have no problem shooting somebody in the back unarmed.

Also, if I can sneak up on you by a manner of hidden stealth regardless if your unarmed in taking you out from a half mile away in distance I'll do so because nobody ever said that fighting or warfare was fair.

Fair fighting? What the fuck is that?

Fuck honor. I'm only into fighting when it concerns winning or achieving my personal objectives.

I'm in it for success which means if I have to cheat or use deception I'm most certainly going to.

I'm the type of guy that I'll sneak up on a person while they are sleeping in taking them out right at the moment of their most complete vulnerability.

This is my own personal form of martial arts. Ruthlessness and showing no mercy or pity.

Nobody will ever receive any special quarter from me.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Apr 14, 2012 2:20 pm

@Apaosha,

Since you're into Kendo, then you'd prob. find it easier to connect the concept of Zanshin with Takuan Soho's philosophical writings.

"There's a common misconception of zanshin among many beginners as well as many advanced students that zanshin is something that is shown after a strike or action. Unfortunately this belief is incorrect. Zanshin is something that one must MAINTAIN after a strike or action, but is begun before the action. Therefore, zanshin, or "preservation of mentality / surviving sincerity", must be in three places: Before an action, During the action, and After the action. In other words, if one begins or commits to an action, one must finish it conclusively and decisively before proceeding to the next action. This conclusiveness should never be affected by the success or failure of one's actions. All actions should be begun and ended properly.
As Komizu sensei once valiantly tried to teach us seniors, zanshin relies heavily on Ichi-shin or "One Mind/Will/Heart". Zanshin cannot co-exist with fear, hesitation, surprise, or even the slightest bit of doubt. (the four poisons of kendo) Whatever action one performs, he/she must commit his whole self to that action ('ki-ken-tai no ichi' = mind sword and body as one).
The samurai practiced day and night for battle and continously challenged himself to become ever better, ever more prepared. If we accept this kendo in the same spirit, then zanshin is in a sense always having our "sword" ready, inside and outside the dojo."
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"In kendo the connection with the opponent is often described as a string between you and the opponent that moves and stretches but must not be broken. Zanshin or translated the “lingering mind” is the conclusion of a kendo strike but not the end of the kendo match it is merely an extension of this connection with the opponent. In a kendo match zanshin when properly done forces one to continue focusing on your next attack without any space for the opponent to gain any advantage if he decides to attack.
...Sutemi and Zanshin are some of the many parts of an attack that defines kendo as separate and distinct from other sword arts from other countries. Sutemi is defined as: The state of giving (something) one’s all, prepared even to give one’s life, without thinking of the outcome. Zanshin is defined as: The body and state of mind in which, even after striking, one is alert and ready to respond instantly to a counterattack by the opponent. These two components in actual battle with a steel blade comprise a completed cut in which the mind and body of the opponent (if still alive) is given the time (seconds) to realize that he has been cut and mortally wounded by your sword. Sutemi emphasizes a deep cut through the body of the opponent, not a timid superficial cut, or a timid attack as it would be without sutemi, a complete mind, body and spirit attack. Like all Japanese martial arts, kendo in real combat is meant to be decisive and a match may be over in a matter of seconds."
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"The following short essay was written by Kyoshi Isogai Korei, 7th dan Kendo, and is an excerpt from his book “Mitomereba Mugendai” (“If you seek it, there is no end”). Translated by George McCall.
Zanshin is like a temple bell…
“Zanshin is leaving the feeling of striking just as it is…”
“Zanshin is not the end of something, but the start of the next thing.”
We must not be deficient with our zanshin.
In short, we shouldn’t let the feeling (of striking) end.
In work, in study, in everything you you do, don’t let the feeling of doing it end.
If the feeling remains, then whether you continue from this or start something new, you can build on you prior success.
If you compare it to a car, its like keeping a stopped cars engine running:
You can simply just put your foot on the accelerator to get going at any time.
When you strike someone do so with a streched out and long voice (kiai).
While you are shouting, your spirit should not be lost."
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""After victory, tighten the cords of your helmet." - Tokugawa Ieyasu

""Zanshin means “the remaining mind” and also “the mind with no remainder.” This is the mind of complete action. It is the moment in kyudo (Zen archery) after releasing the arrow. This is “Om makurasai sowaka” in oryoki practice and drinking the rinse water.
In shodo, it is finishing the brush stroke and the hand and brush moving smoothly off the paper. In taking a step, it is the weight rolling smoothly and the next step arising. In breathing in completely, it is this breath. In breathing out completely, it is this breath. In life, it is this life. Zanshin means complete follow through, leaving no trace. It means each thing, completely, as it is. When body, breath, speech and mind are broken from each other and scattered in concept and strategy, then no true action can reveal itself. There is only hesitation, or trying to push oneself past hesitation. This is the mind of hope and fear, which arises because one is trying to live in some other moment, instead of in the moment that arises now. One is comparing, planning, or trying to maintain an illusion of control in the midst of a reality which is completely beyond control."
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Takuan Soho's beautiful work: 'The Unfettered Mind':
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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apaosha
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Apr 14, 2012 3:17 pm

Thank you for reminding me why I love Japan.

My senpai will appreciate those links.

The state of mind reached when the determination to strike is made, mind and sword and body as one, ki-ken-tai no ichi, has more application than simply a martial art, as your quotes say.

If you link it to Will to Power then perhaps it permits a more unfettered approach to the world rather than the hesitation and indecision that is typical of the average mind. The blade of one's mind should never be sheathed. Always poised to strike and when striking ready immediately to strike once again.

The idea I think is to reduce complacency. After you strike, whether you are successful or not you tend to relax. When you act, you tend to let the world's reaction to that action guide your own subsequent actions, rather than retaining control.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Wed Apr 18, 2012 4:58 pm

@Apaosha,

You're welcome.

And yes, you are spot on; Zanshin is an intense Dionysian concept. For me, this particular passage describes it the best;

“But I am well disposed toward those moralities which goad me to do something and do it again,… and to think of nothing except doing this well, and well as I alone can do it. When one lives like that, one thing after another that simply does not belong to such a life drops off. Without hatred or aversion one sees, this take its leave today, and that tomorrow… He may not even notice that it takes its leave; for his eye is riveted to his goal – forward, not sideward, backward, downward. What we do should determine what we forego; by doing we forego… that is my principle.” [JW, 304]

For instance, when you decide to go into Kendo and take up that sword, Zanshin is automatically also taken up!- meaning, your commitment to your sword, its practice and path and self-vigilance is like a never-ending oath you take to yourself. If you are serious about it, then real Zanshin means, you are saying Yes to it for life.
That demands severe discipline, self-commitment, responsibility and intricate focus. ...And in time, that sword itself disappears and when you move, you move 'as if' you would with a sword... you become the sword, the word, the oath itself- and that's why swordsmanship and calligraphy go together for the Japanese/Chinese. Calligraphy was a warrior/swordsman's initiation; the control and flow of his writing revealed his "inner form" on the scroll. If this wasn't perfect and the word didn't appear like an art itself, it was deemed one was not ready for the art-of-living itself! - the path of the sword.
Zhang Yimou's movie the Hero is a brilliant must-see art-film of this Zanshin esoterism.

Tarantino's Kill Bill was a more pop.commercialization of the same- many come in the way and remain to be taken care of, but she never takes her eyes of her ultimate goal...

In life, many destractions make us stray and take our feet hither and thither, and its ok to get lost, as long as your eyes remain fixed on the goal. When you do that, as in the N. quote above, these unnecessary things will fall off from you on their own. One does not even have to shrug it off. Its an unresting alertness... such that, one lets even all small victories fall off from oneself;

"Preserve and save me up and guard me from all small victories, you gift of my soul...!" [TSZ, Old and New Tables, 30]

For me, in my personal beyond-survivalist, inert, dionysian philosophy, Zanshin means never losing Composure, [form, posture, steady tension] no matter what comes at you.

"An irreligious time which coincides exactly with the idea of a world-city is a time of decline. True. But we have not chosen this time. We cannot help it if we are born as men of the early winter of Civilisation. Everything depends on our seeing our own position, our destiny, clearly, on our realising that though we may lie to ourselves about it we cannot evade it." "We are born into this time and must bravely follow the path to the destined end. There is no other way. Our duty is to hold on to the last position, without hope, without rescue, like that Roman soldier whose bones were found in front of a door in Pompeii, who, during the eruption of Vesuvius, died at his post because they forgot to relieve him. That is greatness. That is what it means to be a thoroughbred. The honorable end is the one thing that can not be taken from a man." [Oswald Spengler, The Decline of the West]

It is the attitude of a man who can choose the hardest road, fight even when he knows that the battle is materially lost and live up to the words of the ancient saga, ‘Loyalty is stronger than fire!’ Through him the traditional idea is asserted, that it is the sense of honor and of shame – not halfway measures drawn from middle class moralities – that creates a substantial, existential difference among beings, almost as great as between one race and another race. If anything positive can be accomplished today or tomorrow, it will not come from the skills of agitators and politicians, but from the natural prestige of men both of yesterday but also, and more so, from the new generation, who recognize what they can achieve and so vouch for their idea. ...It is men, provided they are really men, who make and unmake history. ...Keep your eye on just one thing: to remain on your feet in a world of ruins.” [Evola, Orientamenti, Spengler e Il tramonto dell'Occidente]

"The only thing that matters today is the activity of those who can ‘ride the wave’ and remain firm in their principles, unmoved by any concessions and indifferent to the fevers, the convulsions, the superstitions, and the prostitutions that characterize modern generations. The only thing that matters is the silent endurance of a few, whose impassible presence as ‘stone guests’ helps to create new relationships, new distances, new values, and helps to construct a pole that, although it will certainly not prevent this world inhabited by the distracted and restless from being what it is, will still help to transmit to someone the sensation of the truth – a sensation that could become for them the principle of a liberating crisis." [Julius Evola]


For me, Zanshin means being sang-froid.

My respect to all Senpais.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:18 pm

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Sep 07, 2012 3:45 am

That has the look of rehearsal.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Sep 07, 2012 4:48 am

Practice makes perfect?...

I don't know..., its fantastic concentration though.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:03 am

holy cow, that's awesome
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:00 pm

Quote :
"The demand that the door of the senses be closed is not met by turning energetically away from the sensible world, but rather by a readiness to yield without resistance. In order that this actionless activity may be accomplished instinctively, the soul needs an inner hold, and it wins it by concentrating on breathing. This is performed consciously and with a conscientiousness that borders on the pedantic. The breathing in, like the breathing out, is practised again and again by itself with the utmost care. One does not have to wait long for results. The more one concentrates on breathing, the more the external stimuli fade into the background. They sink away in a kind of
muffled roar which one hears with only half an ear at first, and in the end one finds it no more disturbing than the distant roar of the sea, which, once one has grown accustomed to it, is no longer perceived. In due course one even grows immune to larger stimuli, and at the same time detachment from them becomes easier and quicker. Care has only to be taken that the body is relaxed whether standing, sitting, or lying, and if one then concentrates on breathing one soon feels oneself shut in by impermeable layers of silence. One only knows and feels that one breathes. And, to detach oneself from this feeling and knowing, no fresh decision is required, for the breathing slows down of its own accord, becomes more and more economical in the use of breath, and finally, slipping by degrees into a blurred monotone, escapes one’s attention altogether.
This exquisite state of unconcerned immersion in oneself is not, unfortunately, of long duration. It is liable to be disturbed from inside. As though sprung from nowhere, moods, feelings, desires, worries and even thoughts incontinently rise up, in a meaningless jumble, and the more far−fetched and preposterous they are, and the less they have to do with that on which one has fixed one’s consciousness, the more tenaciously they hang on. It is as though they wanted to avenge themselves on consciousness for having, through concentration, touched upon realms it would otherwise never reach. The only successful way of rendering this disturbance inoperative is to keep on breathing quietly and unconcernedly, to enter into friendly relations with whatever appears on the scene, to accustom oneself to it, to look at it equably and at last grow weary of looking. In this way one gradually gets into a state which resembles the melting drowsiness on the verge of sleep.
To slip into it finally is the danger that has to be avoided. It is met by a peculiar leap of concentration, comparable perhaps to the jolt which a man who has stayed up all night gives himself when he knows that his life depends on all his senses being alert; and if this leap has been successful but a single time it can be repeated with certainty. With its help the soul is brought to the point where it vibrates of itself in itself ̇a serene pulsation
which can be heightened into the feeling, otherwise experienced only in rare dreams, of extraordinary lightness, and the rapturous certainty of being able to summon up energies in any direction, to intensify or to release tensions graded to a nicety.
This state, in which nothing definite is thought, planned, striven for, desired or expected, which aims in no particular direction and yet knows itself capable alike of the possible and the impossible, so unswerving is its power ̇this state, which is at bottom purposeless and egoless, was called by the Master truly " spiritual ". It is in fact charged with spiritual awareness and is therefore also called " right presence of mind ". This means that the mind or spirit is present everywhere, because it is nowhere attached to any particular place. And it can remain present because, even when related to this or that object, it does not cling to it by reflection and thus lose its original mobility. Like water filling a pond, which is always ready to flow off again, it can work its inexhaustible power because it is free, and be open to everything because it is empty. This state is essentially a primordial state, and its symbol, the empty circle, is not empty of meaning for him who stands within it." [Herrigel]

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Quote :
"The Northern Tradition does not have specific breathing exercises, such as the Yoga practices of India, or even Buddhist chanting meditation. In my youth, I did learn Pranayama breathing (the basic technique of which is simply a rather intense and lengthened version of the four-fold breath in Lydia's piece above) largely from living in a houseful of hippie roommates, but I didn't relate it to my magical or spiritual practices until I found myself combining controlled breathing with another skill I'd been trained in - singing. Somewhere along the line I discovered that the breathing techniques learned for voice training and the breathing techniques taught by yogic practitioners were not all that different, and could be combined with a form of magic that I later learned was a form of galdr - singing your intent out with your breath."

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Quote :
"Perceiving transitoriness, I will breathe in,' 'perceiving transitoriness, I will breathe out' - thus he trains himself. 'Perceiving unattractiveness, I will breathe in,' 'perceiving unattractiviness, I will breathe out' - thus he trains himself. 'Perceiving estrangement, I will breathe in,' 'perceiving estrangement, I will breathe out' - thus he trains himself. Thus, as respects the phenomena, does the monk keep watch upon the phenomena, untiring, clear-minded, thoughtful, after having overcome worldly wants and care. And how wants and cares are overcome, he has wisely observed, and well has he equalized it." [Grimm, Doctrine of the Buddha]


The idea was to keep one thing constant (the breathing) and observe everything else around that relatively stable point.

That's how one also invites the noble thoughts in, and sends the disharmonious ones out. One controls everything with one's breath alone.
Breath-control in brief acts out the Aryan path of Brahmayana: Raising the self from the self.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*


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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Jan 18, 2013 1:00 am

Quote :
This state, in which nothing definite is thought, planned, striven for, desired or expected, which aims in no particular direction and yet knows itself capable alike of the possible and the impossible, so unswerving is its power ̇this state, which is at bottom purposeless and egoless, was called by the Master truly " spiritual ". It is in fact charged with spiritual awareness and is therefore also called " right presence of mind ". This means that the mind or spirit is present everywhere, because it is nowhere attached to any particular place. And it can remain present because, even when related to this or that object, it does not cling to it by reflection and thus lose its original mobility. Like water filling a pond, which is always ready to flow off again, it can work its inexhaustible power because it is free, and be open to everything because it is empty. This state is essentially a primordial state, and its symbol, the empty circle, is not empty of meaning for him who stands within it." [Herrigel]

"A good martial artist does not become tense, but ready. Not thinking, yet not dreaming. Ready for whatever may come. When the opponent expands, I contract; and when he contracts, I expand. And when there is an opportunity, "I" do not hit, "it" hits all by itself. " - Bruce Lee

"To stand with relaxed muscles and with unharnessed will: that is the hardest for all of you, ye sublime ones!" -N
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:19 pm

perpetualburn wrote:

"A good martial artist does not become tense, but ready. Not thinking, yet not dreaming. Ready for whatever may come. When the opponent expands, I contract; and when he contracts, I expand. And when there is an opportunity, "I" do not hit, "it" hits all by itself. " - Bruce Lee

"To stand with relaxed muscles and with unharnessed will: that is the hardest for all of you, ye sublime ones!" -N


"Lee taught a mode of fighting which he called "bridging the gap," in which "you and your opponent are one—not divided." But this oneness is not without some internal differentiation. Lee describes "fighting like sound and echo," in which one is always already receiving (not being inflicted with) a blow before it arrives; the "intercepting fist" of Jeet Kune Do refers to Lee's fabled ability to always already be striking back before his opponent had even finished throwing a punch.
Like the yin/yang symbol which Lee took as the emblem for his school, "bridging the gap" is about two selves becoming so intertwined that although they remain distinct, they depend on each other for their being. "To know oneself," writes Lee, "is to study oneself in action with another person."

Because one does not want to be disturbed, to be made uncertain, he establishes a pattern of conduct, of thought, a pattern of relationships to man. He then becomes a slave to the pattern and takes the pattern to be the real thing.- Tao of Jeet Kune Do.

"Nirvana," writes Lee... The act [in fighting] is so direct and immediate that intellectualization finds no room to insert itself and cut the act to pieces."

This goes back to Lee's idea that the fighter be an unthinking "automaton," because "concentration is a form of exclusion and where there is exclusion, there is a thinker who excludes. It is the thinker, the excluder, the one who concetrates, who creates contradiction because he forms a center from which there is distraction."
Writing long before the idea of the "decentered subject" came into vogue in the U.S., Lee suggests that we "be at the center of an undifferentiated circle that has no circumference, moving and yet not moving, in tension and yet relaxed, seeing everything happening and yet not at all anxious about its outcome, with nothing purposely designed, nothing consciously calculated, no anticipation, no expectation—in short, standing innocently like a baby and yet with all the cunning, subterfuge and keen intelligence of a fully mature mind." This hard-won, tension-filled state of being allows us to act spontaneously—freely—without just being undisciplined spazzes.

"Action is our relationship to everything," writes Lee, "Action is not a matter of right and wrong. It is only when action is partial that there is a right and wrong." Total, or as Lee might describe it, "fuckingest" action is made possible by total balance and total awareness, which do not exclude anything, but instead encompass both "good" and "evil." This is the way of Jeet Kune Do"."
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:20 pm

"At this point I can no longer evade a direct answer to the question how one becomes what one is. And in giving it I shall have to touch upon that masterpiece in the art of self-preservation which is selfishness. Granting that one’s life-task—the determination and the fate of one’s life-task greatly exceeds the average measure of such things, nothing more dangerous could be conceived than to come face to face with one’s self with this life-task in hand. The fact that one becomes what one is presupposes that one has not the remotest idea of what one is. From this standpoint even the blunders of one’s life have their own meaning and value, the temporary deviations and aberrations, the moments of hesitation and of modesty, the earnestness wasted upon duties which lie outside the actual life-task. In these matters great wisdom, perhaps even the highest wisdom comes into play: in these circumstances in which nosce te ipsum would be the sure road to ruin, forgetting one’s self, misunderstanding one’s self, belittling one’s self, narrowing one’s self and making one’s self mediocre is reason itself. Expressed morally, the love one’s neighbour, living for others and for other things may be a means of protection employed to maintain the hardest kind of selfishness. This is the exceptional case in which I, contrary to my principles and convictions take the side of the altruistic instincts; for here they are employed in the service of selfishness and self-discipline. The whole surface of consciousness—for consciousness is a surface—must be kept free from any of the great imperatives. Beware even of every grand word or attitude! They are all risks by which the instinct can come to "understand itself” too soon. Meanwhile the organizing "idea” which is destined to become master grows and continues to grow into the depths—it begins to command, it leads one slowly back from deviations and aberrations, it prepares individual qualities and capacities which one day will make themselves felt as indispensable to the whole of your task—step by step it cultivates all the supporting faculties before it ever whispers a word concerning the dominant task, the "goal”, the "object” and the "meaning” of it all. Looked at from this standpoint my life is simply amazing. For the task of revaluation of all values more capacities were needed perhaps than could commonly be found together in one individual; and above all antagonistic capacities which had to kept free from mutual strife and destruction. An order of rank among capacities; distance; the art of separating without creating hostility; to avoid confusing things; to keep from reconciling things; an enormous multiplicity and yet the reverse of chaos—all this was the first condition..." [N., EH, 9]


"For this constitutes our pride , this slight tightening of the reins as our urge for certainty races ahead, this self-control of the rider during his wildest rides; for we still ride mad and fiery horses, and when we hesitate it is least of all danger that makes us hesitate." [N., JW, 375]

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:52 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:02 am

I like how he is being accurate in addressing the meridians. It's almost evil. Of course his test-dummy is not an opponent, I would like to see this work in a fight wityh a large fighter.

Quote :
"A good martial artist does not become tense, but ready. Not thinking, yet not dreaming. Ready for whatever may come. When the opponent expands, I contract; and when he contracts, I expand. And when there is an opportunity, "I" do not hit, "it" hits all by itself. " - Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee was talking about Wing Chun, which was his basic skill. "If the way is clear, move forward".
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Feb 01, 2013 6:59 pm

Bruce Lee would get his ass kicked in the octagon.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:38 pm

Satyr wrote:
Bruce Lee would get his ass kicked in the octagon.

In the octagon?

Bruce Lee supposedly was a reader of Spinoza, because of the latter's 'pantheism', which Bruce Lee might have misconnected with the Tao...


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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:39 pm

Pangrateion.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:53 pm

Fixed Cross wrote:
I like how he is being accurate in addressing the meridians. It's almost evil. Of course his test-dummy is not an opponent, I would like to see this work in a fight wityh a large fighter.

Pressure point knock-outs.
These pressure points are true. I have seen a live demo.

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Pain points:

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Quote :

Quote :
"A good martial artist does not become tense, but ready. Not thinking, yet not dreaming. Ready for whatever may come. When the opponent expands, I contract; and when he contracts, I expand. And when there is an opportunity, "I" do not hit, "it" hits all by itself. " - Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee was talking about Wing Chun, which was his basic skill. "If the way is clear, move forward".

No, he's talking about Un-clinging Alertness, and effectiveness of Spontaneity, maintaining a Flow without slumping into a fixedness.

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Michael Wong series is nice for the basics:

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:25 pm

All sorts of technique and style.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:26 pm

I can't do this! haha

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Feb 22, 2013 5:10 pm

Quote :
Bruce Lee would get his ass kicked in the octagon.

I think every major UFC athlete looks up to Bruce Lee... Bruce Lee would of completely dominated anyone in his respective weight class... He's simply too fast... There has never been an athlete in MMA that's demonstrated anywhere near his explosive speed (especially his fast kicks)...

Anyways, MMA is for guys without the speed to go into boxing...

Bruce Lee was much different than any other "combat athlete" in that he was a thinker first... His body, his fighting was an expression of his thinking(one in the same)... fighting is just a means really... a way to practice and develop new ways of physical movement, overcoming weakness/resistance, until all the new forms become muscle memory, where action becomes second nature... more ways/drives/forms whatever, are consolidated and under command from a highly explosive and moving center... "not thinking yet not dreaming"... the martial artist is like a small version of a philosopher...

Bruce Lee was unique, and should be admired for his explosiveness, his intensity... he was different than the typical "martial artist." His ego was strong. He had strong aspirations that went far beyond just being some dry, martial arts teacher or just some great fighter... Most "combat athletes" lack this ego, this intensity...

Also, boxing is superior to all these martial arts ( well, karate or kung fu, the practices that don't truly test themselves... muay thai is brutal )... you actually get hit... You have to remain explosive and balanced when you're completely physically exhausted... Boxers are, in general, much more hardened individuals than all these "martial artists."

Having said all that, boxing and mma are just one step up from football or basketball... still a waste of time to follow or care about ( although sparring is great exercise and you learn how to actually fight )... Boxing or mma COULD be a great platform, a means for a very rare individual to air his philosophy... Both sports glorify the individual. The individual would have to possess the same type of inner intensity as Bruce Lee while having extraordinary physical attributes to dominate all opposition( to further exemplify how the sport is just a means )...
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Feb 22, 2013 7:48 pm

You can finish a battle with rapid speed and intensity and thoroughness, in the mind, that the physical battle can be used to simply draw out the logical conclusion:



Philosophy and debating is such a "martial art", indeed. You penetrate and wear down someone already with your psyche first.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:13 pm

Jiu Jitsu is a great martial art to learn what to do in a street fight: get out, get up and run.
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:23 pm

I'm trying to find out about hojojutsu for a book. Do any of you have any good references, videos/books/etc that you could point me towards?
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Apr 20, 2013 4:44 pm

Forging a Katana:

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Wed Dec 04, 2013 3:55 pm

Lyssa wrote:
You can finish a battle with rapid speed and intensity and thoroughness, in the mind, that the physical battle can be used to simply draw out the logical conclusion:



Philosophy and debating is such a "martial art", indeed. You penetrate and wear down someone already with your psyche first.


Quote :
"There are three possible results of the fight: dominance, subdominance and submission. The victor is ‘dominant’ his catecholamine and cortisol levels quickly reach their normal levels after stress action. Experiments have demonstrated that after repeated successful stress actions the base values of noradrenaline, adrenaline and cortisol are even lower than they were before the stress success series. This means that the animals have become healthier through the success series. The cardiac and circulatory complex is able to adapt as the low cortisol levels bring healthy sleep and increased immunity. Here we find a phenomenon which we can call the ‘samurai effect’. The successful combatant finds ever increasing inner peace. His fighting abilities create something like an aura. This aura can be perceived by opponents and can result in duels being decided on the strength of this aura and the opponent signalling ‘I surrender’."[Muhlmann, Maximal Stress Co-operation Theory]

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Wed Dec 11, 2013 9:52 am

How do other people approach Martial Arts, Morphology and Culture? To elaborate: I was discussing with one of the black belts at Karate the difference between how the Japanese can function better at Karate- an example being putting 100% of their weight on their back leg whilst in back stance, as opposed to the 60-70% westerners do- due to their morphology. I'm interested in the cultural implications of practicing a martial art from another culture, and if it's easier to progress and maintain excellence in a martial art from ones own culture, designed to suit ones own morphology e.g. Classical Pugilism for an Englishman. Opinions?
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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:53 am

I would think that a martial art develops in a culture in accordance to that population's physical type, as well as the culture, its mental type, its attitude.

The usage of an other's strength against him could only have developed as a defensive (re)action, where the defender has a lower confidence in his own physical strength.

Pankration developed in ancient Greece, it involves a western style attitude towards physical conflict.

From what I know the eastern martial arts depend on a psychological element.
It is a way of life, not only a way of defeating others.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Wed Dec 11, 2013 2:54 pm

SuperfluousMass wrote:
How do other people approach Martial Arts, Morphology and Culture? To elaborate: I was discussing with one of the black belts at Karate the difference between how the Japanese can function better at Karate- an example being putting 100% of their weight on their back leg whilst in back stance, as opposed to the 60-70% westerners do- due to their morphology. I'm interested in the cultural implications of practicing a martial art from another culture, and if it's easier to progress and maintain excellence in a martial art from ones own culture, designed to suit ones own morphology e.g. Classical Pugilism for an Englishman. Opinions?

Every culture has its own ideal of masculinity, and when you train in a dojo, *technically, you are effecting a personal transformation by adopting and adapting to certain ways of thinking, feeling, visualizing. This was the purpose of a dojo - when a man stepped out of it, he would be "more" in-sync with his cultural roots - "the refining of the reflexive and subconscious patterns using the conscious mind". To effect a way of life. To become a fuller Man, a rounder personality.

So depending on your ideal of masculinity and becoming that Man, you could train your body to open itself to cultivate a certain discipline, though your morphology will naturally alert you to your limitations or potential on how far you can achieve this.

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PostSubject: Re: Martial Arts Sat Dec 28, 2013 7:30 pm



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