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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice Mon Jun 20, 2016 9:03 am

Chandogya Upanishad wrote:
"The sun is indeed the honey of the Devas." [3.1.1]

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Rig Veda wrote:
"1. I have tasted the sweet drink of life, knowing that it inspires good thoughts and joyous expansiveness to the extreme, that all the gods and mortals seek it together, calling it honey.
2. When you penetrate inside, you will know no limits…
3. We have drunk the Soma; we have become immortal; we have gone to
the light; we have found the gods...
5. The glorious drops that I have drunk set me free in wide space...
11. Weaknesses and diseases have gone; the forces of darkness have fled in terror. Soma has climbed up in us, expanding. We have come to the place where they stretch out our life-spans.
12. The drop that we have drunk has entered our hearts, an immortal inside mortals…" [8.48]


Poetic Edda wrote:
"I visited the old giant, now I’ve come back, I didn’t get much there from being silent; with many words I spoke to my advantage in Suttung’s hall.
Gunnlod gave me from her golden throne a drink of the precious mead;
a poor reward I let her have in return,
for her open-heartedness,
for her heavy spirit.
With the mouth of the auger I made space for myself and gnawed through the stone;
over me and under me went the paths of the giants, thus I risked my head.
The cheaply bought beauty I made good use of,
the wise lack for little;
for Odrerir has now come up
to the rim of the sanctuaries of men." [Larrington 1999: 28]

Prose Edda


Quote :
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Soma and Mimir

Soma and the Mead of Poetry

The Poetic Mead



The Reagle Eagle, the King of the Sky, the heights of our awareness, our super-consciousness, our (f)light of poetry, our inspiration that up-lifts…

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Kvilhaug wrote:
"Is it so hard to imagine that the land beyond the sun is more beautiful than the sun itself, and that Gunnlöd may be sitting there on a golden throne, offering immortality to a mortal man? And this after he has experienced the horror of death and been born again, just as the earth is in Völuspá."

- Svava Jacobsdottir

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"In his book Lady With a Mead Cup, Michael Enright shows how the offering of mead by a royal or noble lady was part of an ancient Germanic (and Celtic) ritual the purpose of which was to establish kingly authority and hierarchy within the king ́s warband.

The lady is either named after the drink itself, such as “Intoxication”, or after her function as ruler of the land: “Sovereignty”. Only when the young hero accepts the drink and her holy embrace, is he fit to be king. This authority is granted through sacred marriage. In the Irish sources, the goddess is seated on a crystal chair, and the drink is emphazised for its (red) color and intoxicating effect. It is ladled out with a golden ladle and served from a golden cup. The hero has to swear an oath to the goddess. In the Hávamál, Gunnlöd is sitting on a golden chair, from where she ladles out the “precious mead” and serves it to Ódinn in a cup. The drink is called litr in st. 107, meaning “color”, a fact Jacobsdottir connects to the red color of the Irish mead. Ódinn has sworn a sacred ring-oath which Jacobsdottir interprets as an oath of marriage (which Ódinn breaks).

After drinking it, Ódinn relates how he has obtained wisdom and become strengthened with the power of the Earth, bringing the mead up into the shrine of the Earth (st. 107-108). Jacobsdottir suggests that the Earth is Gunnlöd herself, personifying the land which the new king has married. The shrine of Earth may have had its ritual counterpart in a cave or grave-mound. Hieros Gamos was known in Norse society, and the theme of the sacred drink is also to be found in older Indo-European material.
An ideology of “sacred” kingship based on the heritage of a sacred marriage between a god and a giantess may very well reflect rituals of initiation into kingship through trials in the other world or world of the dead, culminating in sacred marriage.

The “giants” are the primeval beings, existing before the gods and the ordered world, and are, ultimately, their destroyers. Giantesses operate as mistresses of the realms of death: Hel rules in Niflheim – the “misty World” where most dead souls have to go – even the soul of the god Balder, for whom tables are decked and mead brewed – but hidden - in that dark realm. Hel ́s hall is surrounded by tall gates that must not be touched by the living. Niflheim is filled with poisonous rivers, with serpents and wolves, animals associated with other giantesses like Hyrrokkin, Skadi, Hyndla and the wolf-riding, serpent-handling, death-declaring fylgja that appears in the poem of Helgi Hjörvardsson. Hel ́s brothers are the World Serpent, who lays coiled around the ordered world (Midgardr,) and the wolf Fenrir who is destined to devour Ódinn during Ragnarrök.

Niflheim lies to the icy north of the world, where there is also a giant in eagle ́s disguise whose name is Hræsvelgr, “The Corpse- Swallower”. He is the origin of the winds of the world. The realm lies at one of the roots of the world tree where there is a well infested by serpents, from which many of the world ́s rivers originate. Hel is said to have power over nine worlds. According to Snorri, Hel ́s face is half pink as life, and half blue as death. Another realm of death is below the sea, where Rán – “robbery” - dwells, catching those who drown in her net. She has nine daughters, who are often associated with the waves. Through poetic metaphors they are also connected to gold and poetry. Rán ́s realm is also associated with mead, cauldrons and decked tables, as we see in the beginning of the Skáldskaparmál. Steinsland has shown how the experience of death often is depicted as something of an erotic feast or even a wedding to the mistresses of death.

Gunnlöd means “Invitation to Battle”.

Gunnlöd is seated, queen-like, on a golden throne. She dwells within a place called Hnitbjörg –the “Beating Rock”. And she is a guardian. This is in accordance with her role as a giantess, since giantesses are frequently related to rock, stone and mountain.
The inside of a rock, filled with the pathways of giants, where Ódinn literally risks his life, may very well denote a realm of death: the burial mound or tomb. Hilda Ellis Davidson describes the burial mound and the mound as such as sites where certain people would go for wisdom and inspiration.

Jacobsdottir translates Hnitbjörg as “Collision-Cliffs”, regarding it as “the cliffs which crash together”. According to her, they are a perfect image of the Symplegades of Greek mythology; the cliffs which crash together around the perilous entrance to the world of the undead, the obstacle that the hero had to pass if he wished to find treasure in the other world. In the Old Indian epic Mahabharata, the eagle Garuda (like all “soma thiefs”) has to pass through a wheel of flame to reach the soma, Water of Life. The wheel is pictured as golden, razor-sharp reeds that crash together in the blink of an eye.

Jacobsdottir also convincingly shows how the serpent- and eagle-symbolisms of Ódinn ́s disguise in Snorri ́s version have their counterparts in Indian soma mythology. Ódinn takes upon himself the very imagery associated with the powers of death: the serpent and the eagle are both prominent characters in the realm of Hel.
Ódinn ́s escape alive from that realm, carrying with him the hidden and well-guarded mead of poetry and divine wisdom, means that he is in fact conquering death. Conquering death, gathering wisdom in the underworld, and returning with the arts of runes and galdr…"

Maiden with the Mead


Follow Hel's wells...

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Well dressing is an ancient Celtic custom that continues in England's remote regions, particularly Derbyshire and Staffordshire.
The "three vats" that Cuchulain needs to cool off after his soul "brims" up to the head is all tied with the above.

The sun, both mead and monster,
both song and scorching madness,
both eagle and serpent...
gladness and the genii...

Sol(e) signigicance:

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The alchemist transforms the dead lead of personality into the lively gold of the spirit…

Happy solstice,
Light above the darkness - a-live, a-lit.

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_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice Thu Sep 22, 2016 12:05 pm

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The bounty of Autumn to all.


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Olga Simonova



William Gallaghr wrote:
" THE AUTUMN time is with us. Its approach
Was heralded, not many days ago,
By hazy skies that veiled the brazen sun,
And sea-like murmurs from the rustling corn,
And low-voiced brooks that wandered drowsily
By pendent clusters of empurpling grapes
Swinging upon the vine. And now, ’t is here!
And what a change hath passed upon the face
Of nature, where the waving forest spreads,
Then robed in deepest green! All through the night
The subtle frost has plied its magic art;
And in the day the golden sun hath wrought
True wonders; and the winds of morn and even
Have touched with magic breath the changing leaves.
And now, as wanders the dilating eye
Athwart the varied landscape, circling far,
What gorgeousness, what blazonry, what pomp
Of colors bursts upon the ravished sight!
Here, where the poplar rears its yellow crest,
A golden glory; yonder, where the oak
Stands monarch of the forest, and the ash
Is girt with flame-like parasite, and broad
The dogwood spreads beneath, and, fringing all,
The sumac blushes to the ground, a flood
Of deepest crimson; and afar, where looms
The gnarlëd gum, a cloud of bloodiest red.

Out in the woods of autumn! I have cast
Aside the shackles of the town, that vex
The fetterless soul, and come to hide myself,
Miami! in thy venerable shades.
Here where seclusion looks out on a scene
Of matchless beauty, I will pause awhile,
And on this bank with varied mosses crowned
Gently recline. Beneath me, silver-bright,
Glide the calm waters, with a plaintive moan
For summer’s parting glories. High o’er-head,
Seeking the sedgy brinks of still lagoons
That bask in southern suns the winter through,
Sails tireless the unerring waterfowl,
Screaming among the cloud-racks. Oft from where,
In bushy covert hid, the partridge stands,
Bursts suddenly the whistle clear and loud,
Far-echoing through the dim wood’s fretted aisles.
Deep murmurs from the trees, bending with brown
And ripened mast, are interrupted oft
By sounds of dropping nuts; and warily
The turkey from the thicket comes, and swift
As flies an arrow darts the pheasant down,
To batten on the autumn; and the air,
At times, is darkened by a sudden rush
Of myriad wings, as the wild pigeon leads
His squadrons to the banquet. Far away.
Where tranquil groves on sunny slopes supply
Their liberal store of fruits, the merry laugh
Of children, and the truant school-boy’s shout,
Ring on the air, as, from the hollows borne,
Nuts load their creaking carts, and lush pawpaws
Their motley baskets fill, with clustering grapes
And golden-sphered persimmons spread o’er all." [Autumn in the West]

_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice Mon Oct 31, 2016 11:02 am

Recalling the deep imprints and all the rich hues of ancient memories, those strange fates, now dormant, now flaring in our veins…
Hail the light within...

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Haruki Murakami wrote:
"Most things are forgotten over time.
Even the war itself, the life-and-death struggle
people went through is now like something
from the distant past. We’re so caught up
in our everyday lives that events of the past
are no longer in orbit around our minds.
There are just too many things we have to think
about everyday, too many new things we have to learn.
But still, no matter how much time passes,
no matter what takes place in the interim,
there are some things we can never assign to oblivion,
memories we can never rub away.
They remain with us forever, like a touchstone.”

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Blessed Samhain.

Samhain and Agriculture

_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:33 am

When winter pulls all the threads apart, then the first restoration is to re-tie what's frayed…
Build from base again, base-ic structure…
ascend from the stairwell of the abysmal heart,
Brigid's cross...
After the cold, movement begins again with fire,,
the knots follow one upon another inciting continuous motion,
turning and twisting one after the other,
like a snake…
like a verse (versus)...
like the song of a bride...
the sun must be churned out like butter,
soft golden fire,
ewe's milk… oimelc… Imbolc…
the sun moving gracefully like a swan in the sky,
inspiration, poetry, life...


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Quote :
"Spring is the season of new life, and as the ground warms, one of the first denizens of the animal kingdom we begin to notice emerging is the serpent. While a lot of people are afraid of snakes, it's important to remember that in many cultures, serpent mythology is strongly tied to the cycle of life, death and rebirth.

In Scotland, Highlanders had a tradition of pounding the ground with a stick until the serpent emerged. The snake's behavior gave them a good idea of how much frost was left in the season. Folklorist Alexander Carmichael points out in the Carmina Gadelica that there's actually a poem in honor of the serpent emerging from its burrow to predict spring-like weather on "the brown day of Bride":

Thig an nathair as an toll
(The serpent will come from the hole)
la donn Bride
(on the brown day of Bride (Brighid)
Ged robh tri traighean dh’an
(though there may be three feet of snow)
Air leachd an lair
(On the surface of the ground.)

Among agricultural societies, this time of year was marked by the preparation for the spring lambing, after which the ewes would lactate (hence the term "ewe's milk" as "Oimelc"). At Neolithic sites in Ireland, underground chambers align perfectly with the rising sun on Imbolc..."

1


Quote :
The History of Butter


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Associated with the central rod, there were manifold metaphorical associations with the fire-drill, the cosmic tree, the cosmic-axis, and the spinal column… and the churning of soul-full thoughts [the butter, the cream of being, the bride…], song, from the abyssmal pit, the milky way galaxy - the two snake ropes being demons and divinities, flux and flow, the leftover non-buttery 'poison' being drunk by Dionysos, to maintain order in the world, and wel-coming the sun again...

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Hail ING !

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_________________
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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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Lyssa
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice Mon May 01, 2017 12:16 am

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Quote :
"Eos is cognate to the Vedic goddess Ushas, Lithuanian goddess Austrine, and Roman goddess Aurora (Old Latin Ausosa), all three of whom are also goddesses of the dawn. All four are considered derivatives of the Proto-Indo-European stem *h₂ewsṓs[2] (later *Ausṓs), "dawn", a stem that also gave rise to Proto-Germanic *Austrō, Old Germanic *Ōstara and Old English Ēostre/Ēastre. Eos, preceded by the Morning Star, is seen as the genetrix of all the stars and planets; her tears are considered to have created the morning dew, personified as Ersa or Herse.{Ovid, Metamorphoses 13.621-2}."

Eos

Quote :
"In some areas, young girls having first bathed in the May dew would return home with branches of hawthorn which would be hung over the door to protect the household from the spells of witches and the evil eye."

May day


Quote :
"The plainest girl will be beautiful if she rises early on May Day and bathes her face in morning dew at sunrise. So goes the old Irish saying...

If she was daring enough to undress and roll naked, she was given great beauty of person; the dew was also believed to bring immunity to freckles, sunburn, chapping, and wrinkles during the coming year. It cured or prevented headaches, skin ailments and sore eyes and, if applied to the eyes, it ensured that its user rose every morning clear-eyed, alert and refreshed, even after a very short sleep.

The man who washed his hands in the dew of May Day gained skill in opening knots and locks, in mending nets and disentangling ropes. The woman who did like-wise could unravel tangled threads with ease.

To walk barefoot in the dew cured soreness, prevented corns and bunions and ensured healthy feet during the year. In his Natural History of Ireland, Dr. Gerard Boate (1652) writes of the virtues of May Day Dew:

"The English women and gentlewomen in Ireland, as in England, did use in the beginning of the summer to gather good store of dew, to keep it by them all the year after for several good uses both of physick and otherwise. Their manner of collecting and keeping it was this. In the month of May especially, and also in part of the month of June, they would go forth betimes in the morning, and before sun-rising, into a green field, and there either with their hands strike off the dew from the tops of the the herbs into a dish, or else throwing clean linnnen cloaths upon the ground, take off the dew from the herbs into them, and afterwards wring it out into dishes: and thus they continue their work until they have got a sufficient quantity of dew according to their intentions. That which is gotten from the grass will serve, but they chuse rather to have it from the green corn, especially wheat, if they can have the convenience to do so, as being persuaded that this dew hath more vertues and is better for all purposes than that which hath been collected from the grass or other herbs. The dew thus gathered they put in a glass bottle and so set it in a place where it may have the warm sunshine all day long, keeping it there all the summer; after some days rest some dregs and dirt will settle to the bottom; the which when they perceive, they pour off all the clear dew into another vessel, and fling away those settings. This they do often as those good women see any notable quantity; they still pour off the the clear dew from them: doing thus al summer long, until it be clear to the bottom. The dew thus thoroughly purified looketh whitish, and keepeth good for a year or two after.""

Mayday Dew


Quote :
"From first dusk of a Beltane morn
springs a newborn Summer sweat
on whiskers of the unshaved lawn
in a rorulent stage set.
                    -
When maidens trod their harvest,
hazy pavonated skies
will slow glow by a sunlight crest
as will the world in their eyes.
                    -
The maya born of paynim lore
that a promise deemed as truth
has soaked in May dew's lucid core
gifts of beauty and of youth.
                     -
The vessel called the holy well
is the site of meadow glow
this day casts by festive spell
in its subtle serous flow
                     -
If captured or if baigned good,
all the straggler moisture fades
and cattle freed from barths now could
graze new morn dampened blades.
                     -
The rustic lifelode mana rites
will transcend this daylight spry
into glows of bonfire lights
into the nightfallen sky.
                      -
With full day's end upon all,
the festive flames quell to earth.
Hopes to yield that bountiful pall
outweighs that of May dew worth." [Charles Peter Watson]

Quote :
"lucida (n.)
in astronomy, "star easily seen by the naked eye," also "brightest star in a constellation or group," 1727, from Modern Latin lucida (stella) "bright star," from fem. of Latin lucidus "light, bright, clear". Plural lucidae. Astronomy has used lucid for "visible to the naked eye" since 1690s.


Venus, the brightest star, the morning star, the morning dew...

"To bring in the May" was to grace the self or the home with the May Dew collected upon the branches.

May moisture and "staying young" was the wealth of well-being, an awakening of the subtle self from 'soft dew'...
The water that "rolled over" was magical in its cyclic renewal and thus its restorative powers...

To anoint oneself, was also called 'confirmer':
to make firm, strengthen, establish...

May the May

dew clear the eyes...

Lucid Amorous.

Phosphorus.

Prosperous.

Merry beltane.

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"ἐδιζησάμην ἐμεωυτόν." [Heraclitus]

"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Happy Solstice

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