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Hrodeberto

Hrodeberto

Gender : Male Capricorn Posts : 1318
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Age : 34
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyMon Jul 20, 2015 10:55 am

Appreciate the clarification, Anfang.

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Life has a twisted sense of humour, doesn't it. . . .

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OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
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Location : Land of Dance and Song

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Jul 21, 2015 1:29 am

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_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
Join date : 2013-10-26
Age : 28
Location : Land of Dance and Song

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Jul 21, 2015 12:40 pm


_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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Riastradh

Riastradh

Gender : Male Posts : 235
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Location : Perfidious Albion

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyFri Jul 24, 2015 12:08 pm


_________________
"A truth that’s told with bad intent
Beats all the lies you can invent."

- William Blake
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Satyr
Daemon
Satyr

Gender : Male Pisces Posts : 26729
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Age : 55
Location : Hyperborea

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyFri Jul 24, 2015 2:12 pm

Good find..
We've been talking about this stuff for years.

According to him, and I would agree, the Modern Nihilist, and it as mindset will destroy itself in time.
The ILP types, you will notice are mostly males with zero genetic investments, and females who are desperate to preserve female sexual power, combating "Patriarchy", unless they give birth to male children, in which case they are willing to consider their own children' fate, as it relates to female nature, which they know intimately.

This liberalization of sex, from the Frankfurt school (Zionism), is already having an effect.
Males, many of whom we can wtiness in our own immediate environment, but for convenience sake we can study on ILP, are left out of the gene-pool.
Free-Radicals, I've called them, which like free-radicals in the body begin to damage the healthy cells by bouncing about.
Having no investment they do not care for the group they belong to.
Some adopt a beta-male primate strategy of becoming doormats for females so as to be rewarded with the opportunity to copulate, and then there are the increasing numbers of men dropping out and then justifying this as "their choice. The last become cynical, beyond measure, and their genetic failure they explain as being planned.
We can find them among the MRM  groups.

Donovan is mentioned...and he writes about sheltering, as I've already explored in my MANifesto.

To study the effect discussed visit ILP.
There the males are predominately childless.
It is why sex, flirting, gossiping dominates the discourse there.
It's a last ditch attempt, covered over by humour and evasion.

Most of the females there are established genetically, bored and looking for an alternative, on their level.
Mostly childless females or traditional females who stray noetically to compensate for their self-repressed physicality.
They seek noetic fertilization - promiscuity for the intellectual female.
They give their body to the man in their life but "cheat" on him psychologically, mentally, by seeking males above him, to fulfill the needs he cannot satisfy.

These females are more open to the views we are expressing here, and those expressed by Donovan and Devlin.

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γνῶθι σεαυτόν
μηδέν άγαν
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novice



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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptySun Jul 26, 2015 8:04 pm

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OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Jul 28, 2015 10:42 pm

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_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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Anfang

Anfang

Gender : Male Virgo Posts : 3786
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyWed Jul 29, 2015 4:47 pm

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OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
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Age : 28
Location : Land of Dance and Song

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyWed Jul 29, 2015 8:33 pm

A nice movie which you can comprehensively watch without knowledge of the Albanian language; mainly shot from one folk song to another, to folk dances, with in between small scenes of to which way the story is going to.


_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
Join date : 2013-10-26
Age : 28
Location : Land of Dance and Song

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyThu Jul 30, 2015 2:04 am

One of my older video's.


_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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https://plus.google.com/u/0/109705167311303906720/posts
OhFortunae

OhFortunae

Gender : Male Scorpio Posts : 2311
Join date : 2013-10-26
Age : 28
Location : Land of Dance and Song

Things to Watch - Page 18 Empty
PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyMon Aug 03, 2015 10:48 pm

The title does not fit the content; I really recommend to listen to this one:
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What I find despicable are those very weak males who barely can hold their backs straight, have no reflection of Will and yet walk with wife and children as family who he, for what ever reason or circumstance, will not be able to protect or guide - at all.



Discourse on an Alien Sky #15 | Revolving Ship of Heaven
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_________________
1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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https://plus.google.com/u/0/109705167311303906720/posts
Guest
Guest



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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 04, 2015 12:21 am

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Lyssa
Har Har Harr
Lyssa

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 04, 2015 3:40 am

Schopenhauer did a good debunking of the duhhh of Fichte's position.

More [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] despite the most positive explanation Zizek gives; I'll add his notes here:

Zizek wrote:
"What are the philosophical roots of Fichte’s error with regard to the status of appearing? Let us return to the early Fichte (of the Jena period) who is usually perceived as a radical subjective idealist: there are two possible descriptions of our reality, ‘dogmatic’ (Spinozean deterministic materialism: we are part of reality, submitted to its laws, an object among others, our freedom is an illusion) and ‘idealist’ (the subject is autono- mous and free, as the absolute I it spontaneously posits reality); reasoning alone cannot decide between the two, the decision is practical, or, to quote his famous dictum, which philosophy one chooses depends on what kind of man one is. Of course, Fichte passionately opts for idealism . . . However, a closer look quickly makes clear that this is not Fichte’s position. Idealism is for Fichte not a new positive teaching that should replace materialism, but – to quote Peter Preuss’s perspicuous formulation –

"merely an intellectual exercise open to anyone who accepts the auton- omy of theoretical reason. Its function is to destroy the current deter- ministic dogma. But if it were now itself to become a theoretical understanding of reality it would be every bit as bad. While human life is no longer seen as a mere natural event it would now be seen as a mere dream. We would be no more human in the one understand- ing than the other. In the one understanding I am the material to which life happens as an event, in the other I am the uninvolved spec- tator of the dream which is my life. Fichte finds each of these to be equal cause for lament. No, the task is not to replace one theoretical philosophy with another one, but to get out of philosophy altogether."

Philosophical reason is not autonomous, but has its foundation in practical reason, i.e., the will. [. . .] Fichte is widely misunderstood as opting for idealism over realism. [. . .] neither realism (of whatever kind) nor idealism (of whatever kind) yields knowledge, theoretical understanding of reality. Both yield unacceptable nonsense if taken to their final conclusions. And precisely this yields the valuable conclu- sion that the intellect is not autonomous. The intellect, to function properly as part of a whole human being, must relate to the activity of that being. Human beings do contemplate and try to understand real- ity, but not from a standpoint outside the world. Human beings are in the world and it is as agents in the world that we require an under- standing of the world. The intellect is not autonomous but has its foundation in our agency, in practical reason or will.
How does the will provide this foundation?

"[. . .] in an act of faith it transforms the apparent picture show of experience into an objective world of things and of other people. [. . .] faith indicates a free (i.e., theoretically unjustifiable) act of mind by which the conditions within which we can act and use our intellects come to be for us."

Fichte’s position is thus not that a passive observer of reality chooses determinism, and an engaged agent idealism: taken as an explanatory theory, idealism does not lead to practical engagement, but to the passive position of being the observer of one’s own dream (reality is already constituted by me, I only have to observe it like that, i.e., not as a substantial independent reality, but as a dream). Both materialism and idealism lead to consequences that make practical activity meaningless or impossible. In order for me to be practically active, engaged in the world, I have to accept myself as a being ‘in the world,’ caught in a situ- ation, interacting with real objects which resist me and which I try to transform. Furthermore, in order to act as a free moral subject, I have to accept the independent existence of other subjects like me, as well as the existence of a higher spiritual order in which I participate and which is independent of natural determinism. Accepting all this is not a matter of knowledge: it can only be a matter of faith. Fichte’s point is thus that the existence of external reality (of which I myself am a part) is not a matter of theoretical proofs, but a practical necessity, a necessary presupposition of me as an agent intervening into reality, interacting with it.

The irony is that Fichte comes here uncannily close to Nikolai Bukharin, a die-hard dialectical materialist who, in his Philosophical Arabesques (one of the most tragic works in the entire history of philoso- phy, a manuscript written in 1937, when he was in the Lubyanka prison, awaiting execution), tries to bring together for the last time his entire life-experience into a consistent philosophical edifice. The first crucial battle that he confronts is the one between the materialist asser- tion of the reality of the external world and what he calls the ‘intrigues of solipsism.’ Once this key battle is won, once the life-asserting reli- ance on the real world liberates us from the damp prison-house of one’s fantasies, one can breathe freely, one only has to draw all the consequences of this first key result.

The mysterious feature of the book’s first chapter in which Bukharin confronts this dilemma, is its tension between form and content: although, at the level of content, Bukharin adamantly denies that we are dealing here with a choice between two beliefs or primordial existential decisions, the whole chapter is struc- tured like a dialogue between a healthy but naïve materialist and Mephistopheles, standing for the ‘devil of solipsism,’ a ‘cunning spirit’ which ‘drapes itself into an enchantingly patterned cloak of iron logic, and it laughs, poking out its tongue.’14 ‘Curling his lips ironically,’ Mephistopheles tempts the materialist with the idea that, since all we have directly access to are our subjective sensations, the only way we can pass from here to the belief into some external reality which exists independently of our sensations is by way of a leap of faith, ‘a salto vitale (as opposed to salto mortale).’15 In short, Mephistopheles, the ‘devil of logic,’ tries to seduce us into accepting that the independent external reality is a matter of faith, that the existence of ‘holy matter’ is the fundamental dogma of the ‘theology’ of dialectical materialism. After a series of arguments (which, one has to admit, although not all totally devoid of philosophical interest, are irredeemably marked by the pre-Kantian naïvety), Bukharin concludes the chapter with the ironic call (which, nonetheless, cannot conceal the underlying despair): ‘Hold your tongue, Mephistopheles! Hold your dissolute tongue!’16 (In spite of this exorcism, devil continues to reappear throughout the book – see the first sentence of chapter 12: ‘After a long interval, the demon of irony again makes his appearance.’17) As in Fichte, external reality is a matter of faith, of breaking the deadlock of theoretical sophistry with a practical salto vitale.

Where Fichte is more consequent than Bukharin is in his awareness that there is an element of credo quia absurdum in this leap: the discord between our knowledge and our ethico-practical engagement is irreduc- ible, one cannot bring them together in a complete ‘world view.’ Fichte thus radicalizes Kant who already conjectured that the transcendental I in its ‘spontaneity’ occupies a third space between phenomena and noumenon itself: the subject’s freedom/spontaneity, though, of course, it is not the property of a phenomenal entity, so that it cannot be dismissed as a false appearance which conceals the noumenal fact that we are totally caught in an inaccessible necessity, is also not simply noumenal. In a mysterious subchapter of his Critique of Practical Reason entitled ‘Of the Wise Adaptation of Man’s Cognitive Faculties to His Practical Vocation,’ Kant endeavors to answer the question of what would happen to us if we were to gain access to the noumenal domain, to the Ding an sich:

"instead of the conflict which now the moral disposition has to wage with inclinations and in which, after some defeats, moral strength of mind may be gradually won, God and eternity in their awful majesty would stand unceasingly before our eyes. [. . .] Thus most actions conforming to the law would be done from fear, few would be done from hope, none from duty. The moral worth of actions, on which alone the worth of the person and even of the world depends in the eyes of supreme wisdom, would not exist at all. The conduct of man, so long as his nature remained as it is now, would be changed into mere mech- anism, where, as in a puppet show, everything would gesticulate well but no life would be found in the figures."

In short, the direct access to the noumenal domain would deprive us of the very ‘spontaneity’ which forms the kernel of transcendental free- dom: it would turn us into lifeless automata, or, to put it in today’s terms, into ‘thinking machines.’ The implication of this passage is much more radical and paradoxical than it may appear. If we discard its inconsis- tency (how could fear and lifeless gesticulation coexist?), the conclusion it imposes is that, at the level of phenomena as well as at the noumenal level, we – humans – are a ‘mere mechanism’ with no autonomy and freedom: as phenomena, we are not free, we are a part of nature, a ‘mere mechanism,’ totally submitted to causal links, a part of the nexus of causes and effects, and as noumena, we are again not free, but reduced to a ‘mere mechanism.’ (Is what Kant describes as a person that directly knows the noumenal domain not strictly homologous to the utilitarian subject whose acts are fully determined by the calculus of pleasures and pains?)

Our freedom persists only in a space in between the phenomenal and the noumenal. It is therefore not that Kant simply limited causality to the phenomenal domain in order to be able to assert that, at the nou- menal level, we are free autonomous agents: we are only free insofar as our horizon is that of the phenomenal, insofar as the noumenal domain remains inaccessible to us. (Kant’s own formulations are misleading, since he often identifies the transcendental subject with the noumenal I whose phenomenal appearance is the empirical ‘person,’ thus shirking from his radical insight into how the transcendental subject is a pure formal-structural function beyond the opposition of the noumenal and the phenomenal.) Kant formulated this deadlock in his famous statement that he had to limit knowledge in order to create space for faith.

Along the same lines, Fichte’s philosophy ends in total cognitive skepticism, i.e., in the abandonment of philosophy proper, and looks for wisdom instead to a kind of quasi-religious faith. But he thinks that this is not a problem, since all that matters is practical: to produce a world fit for human beings, and to produce myself as the person I would be for all eternity.

What this means is that, since there is nothing outside the (self)positing of the absolute I, the non-I can only emerge – can only be posited – as correlative to the I’s non-positedness: the non-I is nothing but the non- positedness of the I. Or, translated into terms closer to our common experience: since, in Fichte’s absolute egological perspective, all positing activity is the activity of the I, when the I encounters the non-I as active, as objective reality exerting active pressure on the I, actively resisting it, this can only be the result of the I’s own passivity: the non-I is active only insofar as I render myself passive and thus let it act back upon me. (With regard to Fichte’s intense ethico-practical stance this means that, when- ever I succumb to the pressure of circumstances, I let myself be deter- mined by this pressure – I am determined by external causes only insofar as I let myself be determined by them, i.e., my determination by external causes is never direct, it is always mediated by my acquiescing to them.) Therein resides, for Fichte, the fatal flaw of Kant’s thing-in-itself: insofar as the Kantian Thing is conceived as existing independently of the I and, as such, exerting pressure on it, we are dealing with an activity in the non-I to which no passivity in the I itself corresponds – and this is what is for Fichte totally unthinkable, a remainder of metaphysical dogmatism. – This brings us to the topic of the subject’s finitude: only in Fichte, the a priori synthesis of the finite and the infinite is the finitude of the positing I:

"the I, that is to say, the ‘act of reflection-into-itself,’ always has to ‘posit something absolute outside itself,’ all the while recognizing that this entity can only exist ‘for it,’ that is to say, relatively to the finitude and the precise mode of intuition of the I."

Fichte thus resumes the basic insight of the philosophy-of-reflection, which is usually formulated in a critical mode: the moment the subject experiences itself as redoubled in reflection, caught in oppositions, etc., it has to relate its own split/mediated condition to some presupposed Absolute inaccessible to it, set up as the standard the subject tries to rejoin. The same insight can also be made in more common-sense terms: when we humans are engaged in a turmoil of activity, it is a human propensity to imagine an external absolute point of reference which provides orientation and stability to our activity. What Fichte does here is that, in the best tradition of transcendental phenomenology, he reads this constellation in a purely immanent way: we should never forget that this Absolute, precisely insofar as it is experienced by the subject as the presupposition of its activity, is actually posited by it, i.e., can only exist ‘for it.’ Two crucial consequences follow from such an immanent read- ing: first, the infinite Absolute is the presupposition of a finite subject, its specter can only arise within the horizon of a finite subject experiencing its finitude as such. Second consequence: this experience of the gap that separates the subject from the infinite Absolute is inherently practical, it is what pushes the subject to incessant activity. Seidel perspicuously con- cludes29 that, with this practical vision, Fichte also opens up the space for a new radical despair: not only my personal despair that I cannot realize the Ideal, not only the despair that reality is too hard, but a suspicion that the Ideal is in itself invalidated, that it simply is not worth it.

For Fichte, the relationship of the I and the non-I is one of mutual limitation. Although this mutual limita- tion is always posited within the absolute I, the key point is not to con- ceive this I in a realist way, as a spiritual substance which ‘contains in itself everything,’ but as an abstract, purely transcendental-ideal, a medium in which the I and the non-I delimit themselves mutually. It is not the absolute I which is ‘(the highest) reality’; the I itself, on the con- trary, only acquires reality through/in its real engagement with the oppos- ing force of the non-I which frustrates it and limits it – there is no reality of the I outside its opposition to the non-I, outside this shock, this encoun- ter of an opposing/frustrating power (which, in its generality, encompasses everything, from the natural inertia of one’s own body to the pressure of social constraints and institutions upon the I, not to mention the trau- matic presence of another I). Depriving the I of the non-I equals depriving it of its reality. The non-I is thus primordially not the abstract object (Objekt) of the subject’s distanced contemplation, but the object as Gegen- stand, what stands there against me, as an obstacle to my effort. As such, the subject’s passivity when facing an object that frustrates its practical effort of positing, its thetic effort, is properly pathetic, or, rather, pathic.30 Or, to put it in yet another way, the subject can only be frustrated/ thwarted, it can only experience the object as an obstacle, insofar as it is itself oriented towards outside, ‘pushing’ outside in its practical effort.

So, within the (absolutely positing) I, the (finite) I and the non-I are posited as divisible, limiting each other – or, as Fichte put it in his famous formula: ‘I oppose in the I a divisible non-I to the divisible I.’ Jacobi was thus in a way right when, in a unique formula from his famous letter to Fichte, he designated the latter’s Wissenschaftslehre as a ‘materialism with- out matter’: the ‘pure consciousness’ of the absolute I within which the I and the non-I mutually delimit each other effectively functions as the idealist version of matter in abstract materialism, i.e., as the abstract (mathematical) space endlessly divided between the I and the non-I.

Nowhere are the proximity and, simultaneously, the gap that separates Fichte from Hegel more clearly discernible than in the difference that separates their respective notions of limitation. What they both share is the insight into how, paradoxically, far from excluding each other, limitation and true infinity are two aspects of the same constellation.
In Hegel, the overlapping of true infinity and self-limitation is developed in the notion of self-relating: in true infinity, the relation-to-other coin- cides with self-relating – this is what, for Hegel, defines the most elemen- tary structure of life. As I pointed out above, a series of contemporary researchers in biology, from Lynn Margulis to Francisco Varela, assert that the true problem is not how an organism and its environs interact or con- nect, but, rather, the opposite one: how does a distinct self-identical organism emerge out of its environs? How does a cell form the mem- brane which separates its inside from its outside? The true problem is thus not how an organism adapts to its environs, but how it is that there is something, a distinct entity, which must adapt itself in the first place.

However, in Fichte the link between infinity and limitation is thor- oughly different from Hegel: the Fichtean infinity is ‘acting infinity,’ the infinity of the subject’s practical engagement. Although an animal obviously can also be frustrated by objects/obstacles, it does not experi- ence its predicament as stricto sensu limited, it is not aware of its limita- tion, since it is simply constrained by/into it. But man does experience his predicament itself as frustratingly limited, and this experience is sustained by his infinite striving to break out of it. In this way, man’s ‘acting infinity’ is directly grounded in his experience of his own fini- tude. Or, to put it in a slightly different way, while an animal is simply/ immediately limited, i.e., while its limit is external to it and thus invisible from within its constrained horizon (if an animal were to speak, it would not be able to say ‘I am constrained to my small poor world, unaware of what I am missing’), man’s limitation is ‘self-limitation’ in the precise sense that it cuts from within into his very identity, frustrating it, ‘finitiz- ing’ it. It is as if the objects/obstacles that frustrate man’s efforts undermine man’s identity from within, preventing him – not only from ‘becoming the world,’ but – from becoming himself. This is the (often overlooked) other side of Fichte’s basic thesis on how ‘I oppose in the I a divisible non-I to the divisible I’: the fact that the limit between the I and the object/obstacle falls within the I does not only entail the triumphant conclusion that the I is the encompassing unity of itself and its objective other; it also entails the much more unpleasant and properly traumatic conclusion that the object/obstacle cuts into my very identity, making it finite/frustrated.

This crucial insight enables us to approach what some interpreters perceive as the problem of Fichte: how to pass from the I to the non-I as an in-itself that has a consistency outside the I’s reflexive self- movement? Does the I’s circular self-positing hang in empty air such that it cannot really ground itself? Was it not already Madame de Stael who, as we mentioned above, after Fichte explained her the I’s self-positing, snapped back: ‘So you mean that the absolute I is like Baron Münchhausen who saved himself from drowning in a swamp by way of grabbing his hair and pulling himself up by his own hands?’ Pierre Livet32 proposed an ingenious solution. He suggests, since there must be a kind of external point of reference for the I (without it, the I would simply collapse into itself), and since this point nonetheless cannot be directly external to the I (any such externality would amount to a concession to the Kantian Thing-in-itself that impedes the I’s absolute self-positing)...

We can see now the fatal flaw of the dismissal of Fichte as the extreme point of German Idealism, as idealism ‘at its worst.’ According to this commonplace, Hegel is the moment of madness, the dream of a ‘system of absolute nowing’ . . . but, as the saying goes, he nonetheless brings much concrete, historical, material, valuable insights on history, politics, culture, aesthetics. Fichte, on the contrary, as an early crazy version of Hegel, is only madness (see Bertrand Russell in his History of Western Phi- losophy). Even Lacan in passing refers to the radical position of solipsism as a madness advocated by no wise man . . . And even those who praise Fichte see in his thought an extreme formulation of modern subjectivity. As a matter of fact, upon a fast reading of Fichte, it cannot but appear so: Fichte starts with I = I, the I’s self-positing; then we pass to not-I; then . . . pure abstract ratiocinations, supported by ridiculous references to math- ematics and argumentation, oscillating between weird jumps and poor common-sense.

However, the paradox is that, as in Kant, Schelling, and in all of German Idealism, what appears an abstract speculation becomes substantial insight the moment we relate it to our most concrete experience. For example, when Fichte claims that ‘it is because the absolute/ideal self is posited by the finite self that the opposing of the non-self occurs,’ this makes sense as a speculative description of the finite subject’s concrete practical engagement: when I (finite subject) ‘posit’ an ideal/unattain- able practical goal, the finite reality outside me appears as ‘not-self,’ as an obstacle to my goal to be overcome, transformed. In the wake of Kant this is Fichte’s ‘primacy of practical reason’: the way I perceive reality depends on my practical project – no project, no obstacles, my cognitive recognition of reality around me is always conditioned/colored by my practical project. The obstacle is not an obstacle to me as an entity, but to me as engaged in realizing a project: ‘if my ideal as a health professional is to save lives, then I will begin to see in my patients the things I need to be concerned about: I will begin to see “things” such as high blood pres- sure, high cholesterol levels, etc.’ Or, an even more perspicuous exam- ple: ‘If [. . .] I am a rich capitalist being driven through a slum district in my air-conditioned limousine, I do not see the poverty and misery of the local inhabitants. What I see is people on welfare who are too lazy to work, etc.’

The I transfers a certain quantum of reality outside itself, it externalizes part of its activity in a non-I which is thereby ‘posited as non-posited,’ i.e., it appears as ‘independent’ of the I. Fichte’s paradox is here that ‘it is the I’s finitude [. . .] and not its reflexivity proper, which renders neces- sary the different modalities of the objectivization of the non-I to which this I relates itself’:37 to put it in somewhat simplified terms, the I is caught in its self-enclosed circle of objectivizations not because he is the infinite ground of all being, but precisely because he is finite. The key point not to be missed is hence the paradoxical link between infinity (in the sense of the absence of external limitation) and finitude: every limitation has to be self-limitation not because the I is an infinite divine ground of all being, but precisely because of its radical finitude: as such, as finite, it cannot ‘step on its own shoulder’ (or, it cannot ‘jump over its own shadow’) and perceive its own external limitation. Portier is fully justified in speaking about the ‘“circle” of the finite absolute Knowing’: finitude and infinity are no longer opposed: it is our very encounter of the obstacle (and thus brutal awareness of our finitude) that, simultane- ously, makes us aware of the infinity within ourselves, of the infinite duty that haunts us in the very core of our being.

The standard reproach according to which Fichte cannot deduce the necessity of the ‘shock,’ i.e., of encountering the obstacle which triggers the subject’s activity, thus simply misses his point: this ‘shock’ has to arise ‘out of nowhere’ because of the subject’s radical finitude – it stands for the intervention of the radical Outside which, as such, by definition can- not be deduced (if it were to be possible to deduce it, we would be back at the metaphysical subject/substance which generates its entire content out of itself):

Fichte’s stroke of genius resides undoubtedly in the fact that he makes out of the inevitable lack that pertains to his categorical deduction, not the weakness, but the supreme force of his system: the fact that Necessity can only be deduced from the practical point of view is itself (theoretically and practically) necessary.39
It is here, in this coincidence of contingency and necessity, of freedom and limitation, that we effectively encounter the ‘acme of Fichte’s edi- fice’:40 in this ‘shock,’ impact, of the non-I onto the I, described by Fichte as simultaneously ‘impossible’ and ‘necessary.’ At this point, finitude (being constrained by an Other) and freedom are no longer opposed, since it is only through the shocking encounter of the obstacle that I becomes free.

This is why, for Fichte, it is the infinite I, not the non-I, which has to ‘finitize’ itself, to appear as the (self)limited I, to split itself into the absolute I and the finite I opposed to non-I. What this means is that, as Portier put it in a wonderfully concise way, ‘every non-I is the non-I of an I, but no I is the I of a non-I.’41 This, however, does not mean that the non-I is simply internal to the I, the outcome of its self-relating – one should be very precise here: over and above the standard ‘dogmatic’ temptation to conceive the I as part of the non-I, as part of objective reality, there is a much more tricky and no less ‘dogmatic’ temptation of transcendental realism itself, of hypostasizing the absolute I into a kind of noumenal meta-Subject/Substance which engenders the finite subject as its phenomenal/empirical appearance. In this case, there would be no truly ‘real’ objects: the objects would be ultimately mere phantom- objects, specters engendered by the absolute I in its circular playing with itself. This point is absolutely crucial, if we are to avoid the notion of Fichte as the ridiculous figure of an ‘absolute idealist’: the absolute I is not merely playing with itself, positing obstacles and then overcoming them, all the time secretly aware that he is the only player/agent in the house. The absolute I is not the absolute real/ideal ground of everything; its status is radically ideal, it is the ideal presupposition of the practically engaged finite I as the only ‘reality’ (since, as we have seen, the I becomes ‘real’ only through its self-limitation in encountering the obstacle of the non-I). This is why Fichte is a moralist idealist, an idealist of infinite duty: freedom is not something that substantially co-exists with the I, it is something that has to be acquired through arduous struggle, through the effort of culture and self-education – the infinite I is nothing but the process of its own infinite becoming.

This brings us to Fichte’s solution of the problem of solipsism: although, at the level of theoretical observation of reality, we are passive receivers, while, at the level of practice, we are active, we intervene, impose our project onto the world, one cannot overcome solipsism from a theoreti- cal standpoint, but only from the practical one: ‘/if/ no effort, /then/ no object.’42 As a theoretical I, I can easily imagine myself as a sole monad caught in the ethereal, non-substantial, cobweb of my own phantasma- gorias, while the moment I engage in practice, I have to struggle with the object’s resistance – or, as Fichte himself put it: ‘The coercion on account of which belief in reality imposes itself is a moral coercion, the only one possible for a free being.’43 Or, as Lacan expresses the same thought much later, ethics is the dimension of the Real, the dimension in which imaginary and symbolic balances are disturbed. This is why Fichte can and has to reject the Kantian solution of the dynamic antinomies: if we resolve them in the Kantian way, by simply allocating each of the two opposed theses to a different level (phenomenally we are caught into necessity, while noumenally we are free), we obfuscate the fact that it is the very phenomenal reality which is the world in which we struggle for free- dom, into which we intervene with free acts.

This is also why Fichte can avoid Kant’s already-mentioned deadlock from his Critique of Practical Reason, where Kant endeavors to answer the question of what would happen to us if we were to gain access to the noumenal domain, to the thing-in-itself: we would have been mere puppets deprived of freedom . . . Fichte allows us to clarify this confusion which arises if we insist on the opposition between the noumenal and the phenomenal: the I is not a noumenal substance, but the pure spontaneity of self-positing; this is why its self-limitation does not need a transcendent God who manipulates our terrestrial situation (limiting our knowledge) in order to foster our moral growth – one can deduce the subject’s limitation in a totally immanent way.

To recapitulate, Fichte’s attempt to get rid of the thing-in-itself follows a very precise logic and intervenes at a very precise point of his critique of Kant. Let us recall that, for Kant, the Thing is introduced as the X that affects the subject when it experiences an object through its senses: the Thing is primarily the source of sensual affections. If, then, we are to get rid of the Thing, it is absolutely crucial to show how the subject can affect itself, how it can act upon itself, not only at the intelligible level but also at the level of (sensual) affections – the absolute subject must be capable of temporal auto-affection.

For Fichte, this I’s ‘sentimental auto-affection’ by means of which the subject experiences its own existence, its own inert given character, and thus relates to itself (or, rather, is for itself) as passive, as affected, is the ultimate foundation of all reality. This does not mean that all reality, all experience of the other as inert/resisting, can be reduced to the subject’s self-experience; it means that it is only the subject’s passive self-relation which opens the subject up to experience otherness.

Therein culminates Fichte’s entire effort, in the deployment of the notion of the subject’s ‘sensual auto-affection’ as the ultimate synthesis of the subject and the object. If this is feasible, then there is no longer the need to posit, behind the transcendental I’s spontaneity, the unknowable ‘noumenal X’ that the subject ‘really is’: if there is genuine self-affection, then the I is also able to fully know itself, i.e, we no longer have to refer to a noumenal ‘I or He or It (the thing) which thinks’ as Kant does in the Critique of Pure Reason. And, thereby, we can also see how Fichte’s urgency to get rid of the thing-in-itself is linked to his focus on the ethico-practical engagement of the subject as grounded in the subject’s freedom: if the subject’s phenomenal (self)experience is just the appearance of an unknown noumenal substance, then our freedom is merely an illusory appearance and we are really like puppets whose acts are regulated by an unknown mechanism. As I pointed out, Kant was fully aware of this radical consequence – and, perhaps, the entire Fichte can be read as an attempt to avoid this Kantian impasse.

But, one may ask, does this assertion of the subject’s capacity to get to fully know itself not contradict Fichte’s very focus on the subject as practically engaged, struggling with objects/obstacles that frustrate its endeavor, which necessarily makes the subject finite? Is it not that only an infinite being can fully know itself? The answer is that the Fichtean subject is precisely the paradoxical conjunction of these two features, of finitude and freedom, since its infinity itself (the infinite striving of its ethical engagement) is an aspect of its finite condition.

This Fichtean notion of the activity of the non-I as strictly correlative to the I’s passivity brings us directly to Otto Weininger’s notion of woman as the embodiment of man’s fall: woman exists (as a thing out there, acting upon man, disturb- ing/perturbing his ethical stance, throwing him off the rails) only insofar as man adopts the stance of passivity. She is literally the result of man’s withdrawal into passivity, so there is no need for man to fight actively woman – his adopting of an active stance automatically pulls the ground from woman’s existence, since her entire being is nothing but man’s non-being.

Here, the question emerges: ‘Fichte asks himself whether the quantity (that is, the activity) of the self can ever equal zero (= 0), whether the self can ever be totally at rest, ever totally passive.’ Fichte’s answer is, of course, no: ‘For the non-self has reality only to the extent that the self is affected by it; otherwise, as such, it has no reality at all [. . .]. I do not see anything I do not will to see.’

However, from the practical standpoint, the finite Self posits the infinite Self in the guise of the ideal of a unity of Self and not-Self, and, with it, the non-self as an obstacle to be overcome. We thus find ourselves in a circle: the absolute Self posits non-self and then finitizes itself by its delimitation; however, the circle closes itself, the absolute presupposition itself (the pure self-positing) returns as presupposed, i.e., as the presupposition of the posited, and, in this sense, as depending on the posited. Far from being an inconsistency, this is the crucial, properly speculative, moment in Fichte: the presupposition itself is (retroactively) posited by the process it generates.
So, perhaps, before dismissing him as the climactic point of subjectivist madness, we should give Fichte a chance." [Mythology, Madness, Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism]

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"All that exists is just and unjust and equally justified in both." [Aeschylus, Prometheus]

"The history of everyday is constituted by our habits. ... How have you lived today?" [N.]

*Become clean, my friends.*
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyThu Aug 06, 2015 1:10 am



Nice documentary about Zulus, I mean Vikings; sorry, thugs.

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyThu Aug 06, 2015 2:40 am



Movie about JudeoXtianFundamentofIslamoMarxistDemocratSecularHumanist mob violence against pagans and the destruction of the great library.

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Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 8:03 pm

The Amazingly Fat Jesus exposed in another video



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Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 8:12 pm

Isn't that the guy who uploaded vids of himself shoving bananas up his arse?

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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 8:30 pm

That's him, the banana man covered in a nice layer of shi..chocolate. A atheist who believes in equality, anti-racism, gay rights and other transcending values.

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Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 8:51 pm

Another retarded retard transcending retardation with an importan opinion to share with the world, he is revolutionary and wants to change the world. [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] What is he talking about them not being a threat to 'the West', if he lives in Canada where they don't have these silent wolves returning to their ''second motherland''.

He is a hardcore Marxist without hyporcitical tendencies, he eats everything on the menu out of equal solidarity, ''eat what is given no special priviliges!'' [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] The typical suburb traveler who got his money from who knows where and starts to..travel.. visit restaurants, Starbucks, touristic entertainment blabla, never is confronted outside of his comfort zone regardless which country.

Love the commentary on him at 10:00 [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

‘’You cannot walk 5 feet in any major city on the planet without fucking running into a religious psychopath who thinks they are going to live forever…’’
‘’These are people from Canada and Australia sitting from their ivory towers of suburbia just commenting on the world ‘’isn’t it great I am sitting in my apartment in Melbourne with my health care and my standard of living and my life expectancy and I am commenting on.’’’’

This protected Marxist reminds me of two other Canadians I have met in my life, the only ones - same essence, one in Israel another in France both utter wimps.







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1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 10:00 pm

I'd say how muscly a male is plays a minor role in the social dynamics of being an 'alpha' - in our environment the competition is not physical and so the strenght is reduced to a minimal suggestive function that is useful for scaring teens away and impressing females. What constitutes to being an 'alpha' is a mentality, a character - this being the most important factor in being competent at fulfilling your gender role.
*
Even in a case of a rare physical conflict on a street we have technologies available to us that allow to compensate for the physical disadvantage; eg. me buying a pepper gas made me a bigger threat than a guy who spent 10 years of his life at the gym, some money and a 5 minut trip allowed me to posses a more effective way of of fighting.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 10:36 pm

And the outside, manner of movements, facial expression when making certain statements, doesn't expose the mental characteristics? Beside his sheltered radiance from his untouched face, I did not refer to the outer appearance merely though, the content of how they behave, indeed masculinity in spirit (reflecting in appearance often enough), those who I had met were as I wrote them to be, by behaviour so (one being in the Canadian reserves as he tried to glorify himself).

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1. "Youth, oh, youth! | of whom then, youth, art thou born?
Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 11:24 pm

I agree with you.
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyTue Aug 11, 2015 11:43 pm



Save the world and adopt a AIDS infested black baby
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Say whose son thou art,
Who in Fafnir's blood | thy bright blade reddened,
And struck thy sword to my heart."


2. "The Noble Hart | my name, and I go
A motherless man abroad;
Father I had not, | as others have,
And lonely ever I live."
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PostSubject: Re: Things to Watch Things to Watch - Page 18 EmptyWed Aug 12, 2015 12:37 am

These people are insane.


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This guy has an excellent channel ^^^. Check it out.
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